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The Irish National Sailing School J109 yacht is available to charter for Volvo Dun Laoghaire regatta and other Irish sailing events this season. 

Jedi is a highly competitive J109 yacht and part of DBSC's ultra–competitive Class One fleet of 20 boats on Dublin Bay. 

Regular readers of Afloat.ie will know the J109 class in Ireland needs no introduction, the cruiser racer offers exciting and exhilarating sailing yet in a very user friendly and comfortable package.

Jedi is, according to the INSS's Kenny Rumball, 'a perfect example of the J109 having undergone an extensive refit over the winter of 2016-2017 to make her possibly the most IRC optimized J109 available in Europe'

Download the INSS spec sheet below

Published in INSS
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You would be forgiven for thinking that in the marine industry, especially with a business that is mostly on the water, that the winter would be long and dark with little activity. This Autumn has been one of the busiest for the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School. However, as Centre Principal Kenneth Rumball reports, the school is now finally able to start thinking about taking a break.

Last Saturday saw the finale of our Junior Club sailing with nearly 200 young sailors taking to the water every Saturday from September through till December. Parents were invited in for a glass of mulled wine and a mince pie to allow them talk to the children’s instructors about how they are progressing. There was also the RS Super Series which saw 8 RS 200s and 400s racing last Saturday morning. Marty O’Leary still holds the top spot but Kenny Rumball and Brian Byrne are hot on his heels after having enough time to compete in all the races.

Our fleet of yachts were nearly able to take a break however Beaufort Venture our cruising boat was called into action for a four part RTE drama shot in Dun Laoghaire Marina during the week. We will be wrapping up our final few courses this week and weekend with our school groups wrapping up for 2016 and not forgetting our race training group will be racing in the final race of the DBSC Turkey Shoot this coming Sunday.

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under
5th December 2016

Arthur Rumball 1961–2016

When we remember that Arthur Rumball was one of the definitive backroom boys of the Irish maritime world, it is remarkable and heart-warming to reflect on just how many lives he influenced for the better, and how many young people – aspiring sailors and would-be boatbuilders alike – he helped guide towards sailing and career fulfillment.

In his professional life, his work lives on in Viking Marine, while he was the main force in keeping the Irish National Sailing School’s fleet operational. In any size of business operation functioning within the challenges and restraints of the Irish market and our sometimes decidedly quirky sailing world, that would have been a demanding task. But these days the INSS fleet numbers 250 vessels in all, ranging from tiny dinghies up to 1720s and three fully-fledged offshore yachts. Yet in each case, Arthur could be relied on to assess exactly the right level of maintenance and finish required to keep the boat at the optimum level for the task for which it was required, and he did it with a minimum of fuss utilising sometimes very basic facilities.

He was the younger brother of INSS’s founding father Alistair Rumball by seven years, but as there were only the two siblings in this Malahide sailing family, inevitably they shared many experiences, although their sailing careers were to diverge during the period when the age gap seemed at its widest.

INSS Squib keelboat Dun LaoghaireThe Arthur Rumball technique well-demonstrated in some of the INSS’s Squibs which he has specially adapted to be the robust workhorses for introducing thousands of people to sailing. Photo: W M Nixon

However, after Alistair began operations with the Irish National Sailing School with a sailing dinghy or two launching from the public slip in the Coal Harbour in Dun Laoghaire in 1974, Arthur helped now and again on a part-time basis, but by 1980 he was working with Alistair full-time with the INSS and their retail outlet Viking Marine.

Much and all as the brothers had enjoyed an idyllic Malahide childhood, as they both had business training they readily accepted that the greater density of population and affluence meant that any commercial sailing school, with its supporting shop, would have to be Dun Laoghaire-based. Over the years they have introduced thousands of people to sailing in a friendly, non-fussy way which nevertheless turned out hundreds of competent sailors, and reached a new height in 2016 when the INSS’s Reflex 38 Lynx – skippered by Alistair’s son Kenneth - was the top school boat in the Volvo Round Ireland Race, placing 10th overall in a very competitive fleet of 63 boats.

INSS Dinghy fleet Dun Laoghaire The remarkable variety of the INSS training fleet is well shown in just a few of its dinghies crowded together ashore in Dun Laoghaire Photo: W M Nixon

floating dinghy park INSSSpace is so limited along the Dun Laoghaire waterfront that Arthur Rumball had to introduce a floating dinghy park for some of its boats. Photo: W M Nixon

But that was only the peak of an astonishingly varied range of activities, all of which were supported by the ready availability of a fleet of boats whose maintenance Arthur oversaw and took an active involvement in working with. Indeed, there were few in the Irish boat-building and repair business who could rival Arthur’s breadth of experience and ability. His determinedly can-do approach – a Rumball family characteristic – was as inspiring ashore as his colleagues efforts afloat were in developing a practical “get-on-with-it” attitude to boats among those who benefitted from the INSS experience.

Despite his busy life around boats, Arthur had other interests and a very complete home life with Amanda and their three children, now all in their twenties. When it became known some time ago that he was battling gallantly with cancer, the thoughts of many worldwide were with him. And a shared hope was raised when it was known that the cancer had been cleared, even though a long struggle lay ahead for his weakened body to re-build itself.

Until a week ago, the outlook was promising, but then his condition suddenly deteriorated, and on Sunday, Arthur Rumball slipped quietly from among us all too soon at the age of 55. Our heartfelt condolences are with his family at this great loss which we share with his many friends, whose feelings have been best expressed both by Nick Bendon and his team in CH Marine, and by former colleague and pupil Rory Kelleher in Seattle.

From CH Marine, the message was: “From those early pioneering days of Dublin Boat Shows and Viking Marine, we always enjoyed his friendship and support, and while not wanting to use the word “legendary” too lightly, Arthur was that in our eyes, and a larger-than-life figure in the marine industry. This is the passing of a whole era, and we will miss him very much”.

Rory Kelleher spoke from the heart in a message to Alistair Rumball: “Please understand that he lives on in me, by the skills that he taught me. He is – as you are – one of the stones in the foundation of my life. And for that I am very grateful”.

WMN

INSS Lynx round Ireland raceA long way from a sailing dinghy or two being launched from the public slip in Dun Laoghaire in 1974 ……the Irish National Sailing School’s Reflex 38 Lynx at the start of the Volvo Round Ireland Race 2016, in which she was winning sailing school boat, and tenth overall in a fleet of 63

Published in News Update

Eight RS dinghies made it on the water at Dun Laoghaire Harbour for the first of a five one day monthly race days 'Super Series' hosted by the Irish National Sailing Club working closely with the RS Committee.

The series is aimed to be run in a sprint like fashion, with a target of eight races per day. On Day one, seven races were achieved with sailors off the water by 12:30, cold but sunny! Overall Marty O'Leary and Racel Williamson lead from Barry McCartin and Simon Doran. Results downloadable below

 

Published in RS Sailing
Tagged under

Building on the growing numbers in the ISORA racing throughout the last season and in response from boat owners and crews alike, the Irish National Sailing and Powerboat School has announced an all new programme for ISORA and sailors all over the country. There is both a shorebased and practical element to the Dun Laoghaire course which can be taken independently or save costs by booking as a group.

The course aims, to enable skippers and crew to have the information and skills required to safely skipper a yacht on the common ISORA long distance passages within the Irish Sea by both day and night. The course will incorporate elements from the RYA Cruising Scheme Courses and will also include passage planning and navigation by modern chart plotters and other portable e navigational equipment such as iPad and laptop.

The Practical Course will be dynamic and can be adjusted to suit the direct needs of the clients on the differing courses. The fundamental aim of the Practical section of the course will be to give the clients the ability and the confidence to safely execute a typical ISORA race passage. Suitable for skippers and crew alike, the course will take place on an INSS race boat such as the Reflex 38, LYNX or the the school's recently acquired J109 Jedi, both styles of boats being keen competitors on the ISORA circuit.

Published in Offshore
Tagged under

Here's some highlights of Team INSS.ie in the first race of Sunday's 2016 DBSC Turkey Shoot.

Two boats, one skippered by Kenneth Rumball with a crew of race novices and the second by some of the INSS instructors took part in very breezy conditions.

Published in Turkey Shoot
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#INSS - School was out for thousands of teenagers across the country due to yesterday’s ASTI teacher strike – except for one group of students who swapped their classroom for the sea.

The Irish Times reports on the Irish National Sailing and Power Boat School’s special sailing day for pupils affected by the strike on Thursday 27 October.

Fifteen youth sailors who normally take to Dun Laoghaire’s waters on Saturdays got in an early training session, which the sailing school believes would help keep them focused on learning and keeping active in their time off.

The INSS also provides after-school courses for budding sailors, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in How To Sail
Tagged under

As the last of the summer racing series in Dublin Bay come to a close, thoughts soon turn to the winter racing series of the DBSC Turkey Shoot & DMYC Frostbite series. Buoyed up by demand, the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School in Dun Laoghaire Harbour is offering sailors who may not always have the opportunity or access to boats to charter dinghies and keelboats from the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat Schools fleet writes Sailing Shool Principal Kenneth Rumball.

We're delighted to offer our meticulously maintained and race readied 1720s for charter during the DBSC Turkey Shoot and DBSC Spring Chicken Series to past course attendees allowing them to take the next step and race without one of our Team INSS.ie Skippers on board. In addition to the charter, we will also be providing some pre-series coaching to help the team come together and iron out any kinks that may slow you down. More information is available here

In addition, we will also still be racing our 1720 race boat that is represented at the 1720 class events around the country with spaces available on this boat for those who are less experienced to charter a boat and really want to experience a full on sports-boat raced as hard as possible towards the top end of the fleet.

For the DMYC Frostbite Series we are offering junior and adult sailors alike the opportunity to Charter our fleet of Laser dinghies and Topaz Vibe double handed dinghies.

Uniquely the charter also comes with training weekend before the series to ensure you are fully familiar with your boat prior to racing and pre and post race coaching on the spot. The coaching will primarily be focused on pre and post-race briefings and de-briefings as the racing will be “live”, coaching cannot be delivered during the race. Team INSS.ie skippers will themselves be racing on the very same course. A comprehensive review of the weather forecast and other relevant factors will be covered, with a view as to what tactics can be employed to give each competitor the best advantage. After the race we will review the course, the decisions that the INSS.ie skippers made. In addition, sailors will be asked to share any of their specific experiences from the race.

Full information and pricing is available here

 

Published in How To Sail
Tagged under

INSS School principal and skipper Kenneth Rumball reviews his tenth place overall in Volvo Round Ireland 2016 on board the INSS Reflex 38, Lynx.

The idea for the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School to compete in the Round Ireland Yacht race was hatched even before the company planned to enter into the yachtmaster business. In fact when selecting a yacht for our competent crew, dayskipper and yachtmaster teaching duties, we made sure to select a boat that could not only fulfil our teaching duties but could look after an amateur crew while also competing at the highest level offshore.

Our Reflex 38 spent her first year primarily away from racing duties before undergoing significant race preparation ahead of this year’s Round Ireland Yacht Race. Our hull was stripped back and freshly antifouled, electronics upgraded, sheets and halyards replaced along will a full sail valet and re-measurement, this all topped off with a full IRC re-measurement in an effort to reduce our TCC ahead of the race.

Meanwhile we started to advertise our campaign for the year ahead which included not only the race but 2 dedicated training weekends along with 4 ISORA training races to ensure our crew was fully prepared along with the boat ahead of this year’s race. Lynx performed well in this training races, coming 4th in the Dun Laoghaire to Holyhead and 5th in the Dun Laoghaire to Isle of Man.

INSS_Lynx_reflex_38

All set for the off – the INSS Reflex 38 in Dun Laoghaire

All set, our crew for the Round Ireland left Greystones Marina on the 18th of June for the race we had been preparing for all year. Keeping our noses clean at the start, we got clear early and made big gains by going close in under Wicklow head to be one of the first boats heading south. Pulling nicely in the first two hours, unfortunately we got stuffed in a no wind hole off Arklow. Going again we made good ground to round Tuskar in the leading pack before heading south into the building breeze. The breeze built and built and in changing down through our sails we unfortunately blew out or number 4 jib, eventually bringing us down to storm jib and two reefs in the mainsail, below is one our crew’s recollection at this time;
“I’ve never done a long offshore race before. In fact I only started sailing in April this year, so to say I was out of my depth on the Round Ireland is an understatement. However, I was somewhat cautious and logical, so I completed a few courses with INSS on the run up to the to the race including Sea Survival. During this course, among other things, I briefly learned about a storm jib and trysail. I was told I would probably never need to use this type of sail, but it was good to know. Come Sunday night off Cork, day 2 of the Round Ireland, the breeze picked up and I watched our torn number 4 headsail being bundled down the companion way with a calm call for the storm jib. Jaaaysus, I thought, storm sails, storm sails? What's next? What was the next module on that course? I think it was boarding a life raft...”

Once we got around the Fastnet, we were able to crack sails for a great yacht up the west coast, it got a bit breezy at one point where we blew out our A5 in about 35kts of breeze off Galway which forced us to move to our S3. With the clearing weather, we had a great sail around Tory Island while we calculated our approach to the notorious tides around Rathlin Island. Much to our surprise, we hadn’t done a good job of getting to Rathlin on time, we had in fact NAILED our timing, giving us a great run down toward Belfast Lough.

In good breeze we continued on a beat down the Irish Sea before being becalmed in Dundalk Bay. Here we struggled on the last night to get into the land breeze where unfortunately some of the lead boats got away… We spent most of the last night drifting trying to sniff any breeze out with the code zero. It wasn’t until the next morning off the Baily that we got going again to sail in good breeze into Wicklow.

Lynx finished after 5 days and 49 minutes in the 2016 Round Ireland, coming 4th in class 3, 10th overall and 1st Sailing School boat! It was a fantastic race where I am ever grateful to the crew who for some it was the longest they had ever spent at sea and who all performed admirably throughout the race, they would be a real asset to any offshore campaign in the future. Special thanks also go to Conor Kinsella and Luke Malcolm whom I really would have struggled without their talent and dedication.

RI lynx prizegiving

See Round Ireland tracker here Afloat's Round Ireland 2016 coverage is here and download overall results here

 

Published in Round Ireland

Last Sunday, Dun Laoghaire's Irish National Sailing and Powerboat School held its 2016 Open Day in association with Irish Sailing Association's 'Try Sailing' programme.

50 new people to the sport experienced the thrill of sailing onboard a 1720 sportsboat while 64 people enjoyed kayaking and Paddle-Boarding. Check out the video below:

 

Published in How To Sail
Page 6 of 9

William M Nixon has been writing about sailing in Ireland and internationally for many years, with his work appearing in leading sailing publications on both sides of the Atlantic. He has been a regular sailing columnist for four decades with national newspapers in Dublin, and has had several sailing books published in Ireland, the UK, and the US. An active sailor, he has owned a number of boats ranging from a Mirror dinghy to a Contessa 35 cruiser-racer, and has been directly involved in building and campaigning two offshore racers. His cruising experience ranges from Iceland to Spain as well as the Caribbean and the Mediterranean, and he has raced three times in both the Fastnet and Round Ireland Races, in addition to sailing on two round Ireland records. A member for ten years of the Council of the Irish Yachting Association (now the Irish Sailing Association), he has been writing for, and at times editing, Ireland's national sailing magazine since its earliest version more than forty years ago

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