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Displaying items by tag: Wild Atlantic Way

A new study of the Wild Atlantic Way recommends development of “niche marine tourism” options along the coastal route.

Visitors taking part in marine-related activities tend to spend more and stay longer than average, and so regional authorities and tourism agencies should provide supports for these “offerings”, the study says.

It also recommends improving infrastructure, and identifying and developing “the unique experiences and draws” that “entice visitors to stay longer”.

The research was conducted for the Moses project, an EU multinational research initiative involving eight partners representing the five member states of the Atlantic area.

Funded through the EU Interreg programme, the project aims to further the EU’s Blue Growth strategy in five “focus maritime areas” with “the potential to accelerate learning across Europe”.

"Visitors taking part in marine-related activities tend to spend more and stay longer than average"

The study says policies aimed at extending the tourist season should be developed, and environmental pressures and damages should be identified and reduced “early”.

It recommends reducing the emphasis on day trips - where tourist money is often diverted from local residents.

It says efforts should be made to ensure employment is local, and cultural and traditional experiences are supported.

It recommends encouraging ICT uptake in sustainable tourism trail usage.

It also says tourist operators should be encouraged to shorten their supply chains by using locally sourced inputs.

It also says these operators should also be encouraged to “consider their waste management strategies and use of alternative materials”.

A team at NUI Galway’s Socio-Economic Marine Research Unit conducted the research between 2018 and 2020.

The Northern & Western Regional Assembly (NWRA) was also a partner in the two-year study.

Published in Aquatic Tourism

Islands along the Wild Atlantic Way not surprisingly are among seven in a list of islands within Irish and UK waters which draw attention as there’s something about crossing the sea that makes a holiday feel proper.

As BreakingNews adds staycations are all the rage right now for obvious reasons, but cars and trains lack the intrepid glamour of boats and planes, and when you visit an island it feels like you’ve entered a new and exciting ecosystem.

Island hopping begins at home. Here are some awesome islets that can help save your holiday, on both sides of the Irish Sea…

...where Cape Clear off Cork in the south west, the Aran Islands in Galway Bay and Claire Island further to north along the Wild Altantic Way in Co. Mayo proudly feature among the seven islands.

So take a snapshot read of these islands and beyond to those in UK waters by clicking here.

Published in Island News

Off Ireland's west coast a potential ecological disaster was averted when the Naval Service intervened to prevent a cargoship laden with oil from crashing against rocks.

Aqua Transporter, reports Irish Examiner, was carrying 32,000 cubic tonnes of fuel and two cubic tonnes of lubricating oil, had lost power and was drifting towards rocks. If it had collided, its contents would have caused a major pollution incident along the Wild Atlantic Way.

The Coast Guard contacted the Naval Service after receiving a request for help from the ship's Norwegian skipper, who reported he had lost engine power and was drifting. Fortunately, LÉ Niamh was on routine patrol just a few miles away.

The navy ship, under the captaincy of Lieutenant Commander Claire Murphy, responded to the early morning emergency request on Tuesday to help the cargo ship and its crew of six. It was drifting a few miles off Slyne Head, near Galway.

More about the incident by clicking here. 

Afloat.ie adds the Norwegian flagged 60m fish-carrier in recent days departed Rathmullen, Co. Donegal is now docked at the Port of Galway in the Dun Aengus Dock. 

Published in Navy

Keem Bay on Achill Island has made the grade among the 50 best beaches in the world, according to a top travel website.

And as The Irish Post reports, the Co Mayo coastal beauty spot was ranked among the best even of that number, placing just outside the top 10 of Big 7 Travel’s selection.

Keeping company with the gorgeous turquoise waters of the Adriatic and eastern Mediterranean, the West Indies and other breathtaking tropical paradises, we think that’s good going for the Wild Atlantic Way.

Published in Coastal Notes

#ferries - A new service has been launched by Bus Éireann in partnership with Doolin Ferry Company for people to explore the Wild Atlantic Way, reports GalwayDaily.

The new Route 350 which operates from Galway offers a combined bus and ferry service exploring the sights of the Wild Atlantic Way with tour of the Cliffs of Moher or a day ticket out to Inis Oírr.

Customers can avail of two combined ticket options which each cost €38.50 for both the bus ticket and either a 1-hour ferry tour of the Cliffs or a trip out to Inis Oírr.

The bus route also offers a regular service from Galway, through Doolin and on to Ennis that runs up to six times daily.

Bus Éireann describe the new route as a “great value day trip option to visit Ireland’s most popular tours destinations along the very popular Wild Atlantic Way.”

To read more and where to buy tickets, click here. 

Published in Ferry

Force 10 winds forecast for this weekend will attract eight of the world’s more fearless windsurfers to Ireland’s Atlantic coast for a competition three years in the making.

As BreakingNews.ie reports, the precise date and venue for the Red Bull Storm Chase along the Wild Atlantic Way have not yet been decided, being influenced by where the squalls currently tracking towards Ireland ahead of two major storm systems will make landfall.

But if conditions prove optimal, the brave boarders will take to the big waves — judged on the size of their high-flying jumps, their artistry in the air and their overall style amid winds in excess of 100kmh.

BreakingNews.ie has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing

#Angling - A new project on the River Easkey in Co Sligo which has improved and developed angling access to the wild salmon river between Sligo and Ballina has now been completed.

The project, which was delivered by River Easkey Angling Association, received support from Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) via the National Strategy for Angling Development.

Structures such as footbridges, stiles, and ladders were installed along the river, which is located on the Wild Atlantic Way, while walkway routes on the banks of the salmon and trout fishery were also improved.

The work took place upstream of the famous Workhouse Bridge as part of the second phase of this project which initially involved similar works downstream of the bridge last year.

In total, the project has delivered eight new access points to angling, 13 footbridges ranging from three to four metres in length, and five kilometres of improved trail access.

Sean Canney, Minister of State for responsibility for inland fisheries, said on Wednesday (23 January): “I welcome the continuing efforts of Inland Fisheries Ireland in delivering under the National Strategy for Angling Development in partnership and collaboration with local angling clubs and community groups nationwide.

“Inland Fisheries Ireland committed €23,500 in total to support the Easkey project with €10,000 awarded in 2017 and a further €13,500 granted in 2018.

“I also want to congratulate the River Easkey Angling Association on its excellent development ethos. They are a progressive group that helpfully operates an open policy for holders of a State Salmon License with season and day tickets available for access,” he added.

Suzanne Campion, head of business development at IFI, said: “The River Easkey Angling Association has done fantastic work in developing this area as an angling destination. While completing this project and working closely with our project officers, they have given due diligence to everything from financial and environmental governance to biosecurity considerations ensuring the conservation and protection of this wonderful resource.”

Alan Spencer, assistant secretary of the River Easkey Angling Association, expressed the club’s thanks to Inland Fisheries Ireland’s staff for all their help and support during the project, as well as gratitude to landowners who permitted the club and its contractor access to the river through their property.

Published in Angling

#CoastalNotes - Eugene Garrihy a Clare businessman writes The Irish Examiner has criticised the results of a new survey that has labelled Doolin a “litter blackspot."

Mr Garrihy, father of Dancing with the Stars celeb and Fair City actor Aoibheann Garrihy, operates Doolin2Aran Ferries and yesterday described the results of the Irish Business Against Litter litter survey as “grossly unfair”.

This summer, Mr Garrihy’s firm has invested €3m in its operations with the commissioning of the 200-seater Star of Doolin on the Doolin-Aran Islands route.

For further reading click here.

Published in Coastal Notes

#IslandNews - Costing €3 million is a new state-of-the-art ferry to serve the Aran Islands which will arrive in Doolin, Co. Clare next week.

The eco-friendly Star of Doolin writes Galway BayFM has been commissioned by the Garrihy’s family run-business, Doolin2Aran Ferries.

The ferry has been built in La Rochelle, France, and will stop in Brest and Dingle before arriving in Doolin at around 8.30am on Tuesday.

Afloat adds that the owners of the 200 -passenger capacity newbuild also operate a sister company, Dublin Bay Cruises with a former west coast islands ferry, St. Bridget.

 

Published in Island News

#CruiseLiners - Ultra-luxury expedition cruiseship, Silver Cloud anchored in Galway Bay recently as part of clockwise tour of Ireland and where today the ship is docked in Killybegs, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The call off the Port of Galway on Tuesday was the second Silverseas Cruises caller. The operator’s new flagship Silver Muse made a visit earlier this month to become the first caller this season.

A flotila of the cruiseships' zodiac tenders took guests ashore to the 'City of the Tribes'. They disembarked at the port's outer pier leading to the entrance of the Dun Aengus dock basin. 

Silver Cloud is a Bahamas flagged ship that at 17,014 gross registered tonnes is deemed small today in cruiseship terms, however the Monaco based operator offers luxury at the top end of the market. They have 9 cruiseships and last year the Silver Cloud was refurbished.

According to Silversea, they provide the highest space to guest and crew to guest ratios in expedition cruising. In the case of Silver Cloud there are 257 guests served by a crew 223.

Among the facilities is an explorers’ lounge, bar, boutiques, pool deck, spa, fitness centre and a photo-studio. In addition to the Connoisseur’s Corner offering cognacs and cigars for purchase.

Accommodation consists exclusively of luxurious suites where 80% of them feature verandas.

Prior to making the anchorage call off Mutton Island in Galway Bay, Afloat monitored the ice-class 157m Silver Cloud depart Pembroke Dock, south Wales having sailed from the English Channel.

The cruiseship's first destination following the call to Milford Haven estuary was in Irish waters at the spectacular backdrop of the Skelligs, Co. Kerry. This is where the cruiseship extended its role by offering guests access to 16 zodiacs.

Other water-based equipment includes 16 kayaks opening up opportunities when cruising globally to explore through greater independence.

During the cruise leg from Galway Bay to Killybegs, Silver Cloud yesterday called off the Aran Islands at Kilronan, Inishmore. The anchorage call was followed by another off Clare Island on the approaches to Clew Bay.

The 1994 built cruiseship has since docked in the Donegal port this morning.

Published in Cruise Liners
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William M Nixon has been writing about sailing in Ireland and internationally for many years, with his work appearing in leading sailing publications on both sides of the Atlantic. He has been a regular sailing columnist for four decades with national newspapers in Dublin, and has had several sailing books published in Ireland, the UK, and the US. An active sailor, he has owned a number of boats ranging from a Mirror dinghy to a Contessa 35 cruiser-racer, and has been directly involved in building and campaigning two offshore racers. His cruising experience ranges from Iceland to Spain as well as the Caribbean and the Mediterranean, and he has raced three times in both the Fastnet and Round Ireland Races, in addition to sailing on two round Ireland records. A member for ten years of the Council of the Irish Yachting Association (now the Irish Sailing Association), he has been writing for, and at times editing, Ireland's national sailing magazine since its earliest version more than forty years ago

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