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Displaying items by tag: Royal Cork Yacht Club

The 1980s tend to get a bad press as a time when young people left the country in droves, searching for jobs that matched their potential and training. Those of us who stayed at home to battle on, but now find ourselves living in one of the allegedly richest countries in Europe, survived the bad times by generally not keeping overly close tabs on those who had made the Great Escape. For indeed, some had more or less vanished without trace, while others were rumoured to have made some sort of determinedly-sought breakthrough to become household names in their own household, or even better.

GETTING OUT IN 1985

One such is Ken Corry, now Commodore of the highly-regarded 1901-founded Los Angeles Yacht Club. Yet when he departed the intense Cork sailing scene in 1985, boats and sailing in his new life in California were barely even on the to-do list as he worked with increasing success on the lively West Coast, where the multi-opportunity California is nearly 15% of the entire US total economy, while New York state is only 8%.

Neill Love from Cork with Commodore Ken Corry at the Los Angeles Yacht ClubNeill Love from Cork with Commodore Ken Corry at the Los Angeles Yacht Club

DEEPLY INTO CROSSHAVEN JUNIOR SAILING

Yet back in Crosshaven he’d been completely invested in the junior sailing programme, having joined the Royal Cork YC as a kid in 1970, then moving up the ranks to race in the Mirrors and be a helm in the RCYC Team which beat Sutton Dinghy Club for the historic Book Trophy by a cool 17.5 points in 1976.

The most junior of juniors – a young Ken Corry at Crosshaven (left) with Eddie Tingle and the late Suzanne Crosbie. The lifejackets back then were so uncomfortable that where the rules said “Life Jackets Must Be Worn When Sailing”, the youngsters interpreted that to a very fine point, and in a less prosperous era of fewer items of equipment, life jackets could be used as fenders when the boats weren’t actually under wayThe most junior of juniors – a young Ken Corry at Crosshaven (left) with Eddie Tingle and the late Suzanne Crosbie. The lifejackets back then were so uncomfortable that where the rules said “Life Jackets Must Be Worn When Sailing”, the youngsters interpreted that to a very fine point, and in a less prosperous era of fewer items of equipment, life jackets could be used as fenders when the boats weren’t actually under way

Success! Forty-eight years after the event, the 1976 page of “The Book” show young helm Ken Corry (bottom left) proving his worth for Royal Cork in the annual tournament against Sutton Dinghy ClubSuccess! Forty-eight years after the event, the 1976 page of “The Book” show young helm Ken Corry (bottom left) proving his worth for Royal Cork in the annual tournament against Sutton Dinghy Club

MOVING UP THE ROYAL CORK SAILING RANKS

Then he went on to the National 18s for a couple of years before being elevated to a crewing role on Denis Doyle’s new Crosshaven-built Frers 51 Moonduster in 1981, going on to race with The Doyler in that year’s Admiral’s Cup including the Fastnet, and the Sardinia Cup in Porto Cervo in the Mediterranean in 1982. By 1984, he had been swept into the wave of enthusiasm for the J/24s, crewing both for Stephen Hyde in that year’s Worlds at Poole, and subsequently with Anthony O’Leary in the legendary Flying Ferret.

Fresh out of Crosshaven Boatyard in May 1981, Denis Doyle’s new Frers 51 Moonduster had a youthful crew – including Ken Corry – who took a while to realise just how much they needed to ease the backstay when running. Photo: W M NixonFresh out of Crosshaven Boatyard in May 1981, Denis Doyle’s new Frers 51 Moonduster had a youthful crew – including Ken Corry – who took a while to realise just how much they needed to ease the backstay when running. Photo: W M Nixon

But in the mid-1980s, the winters were long and the economic outlook was bleak, and in 1985 he fetched up in California, keen to work. The way his friend Neill Love back in Cork tells it, his reinvolvement – eventually to the highest levels – in the sailing scene in the new environment came about in a very laid-back style:

  • Sailed casually with friends for a number of years before becoming a partner (and now sole owner) of a Cal 40 in restoration project.
  • Joined Board of Directors (the Committee) in Los Angeles Yacht Club 2018
  • Launched superbly restored and successful Cal 40 in 2021
  • Commodore LAYC 2024

Joining the real club….the restoration of Ken Corry’s Cal 40 nears completion in 2021Joining the real club….the restoration of Ken Corry’s Cal 40 nears completion in 2021

It’s a beautiful story, and the involvement of a Cal 40 is the cream on the cake. Back in 1963, sailors of a modernist mind in Ireland were much taken by the new van de Stadt-designed Excalibur 36, virtually all fibreglass and with a spade rudder in the newest of the new styles, completely separate from the keel. There was an attempt to get an OD class going in Dun Laoghaire, but it had petered out by the 1970s, as moving from the very stylish and classic DB24s to the utterly plastic fantastic Excalibur was just too much of a leap.

CAL 40 IS CALIFORNIA’S ENDURING CLASSIC

But meanwhile, in California in 1963, Bill Lapworth unveiled the Cal 40, the same concept as the Cal 40, but with a more slim Pacific style in that very useful extra 4ft of length and enough traditional varnish-work – particularly a wooden cockpit coaming – to keep many traditionalists happy.

The ultimate restored Cal 40 – Stan and and Sally Honey’s Illusion sweeps into another ocean race win. After many years of massive successes on both the Pacific and Atlantic coats of the US with Illusion, Stan and Sally have gone over to the dark side with the purchase of a fully-powered trawler yacht, while Illusion has gone to Stan’s nephew “as he gets what she means”.The ultimate restored Cal 40 – Stan and and Sally Honey’s Illusion sweeps into another ocean race win. After many years of massive successes on both the Pacific and Atlantic coats of the US with Illusion, Stan and Sally have gone over to the dark side with the purchase of a fully-powered trawler yacht, while Illusion has gone to Stan’s nephew “as he gets what she means”.

To cut a long story short, you won’t see any Excalibur 36s making the offshore racing scene these days. Yet in the US on both coasts the Cal 40 wonderboat just keeps on winning, and restoring one – as super-sailors Stan and Sally Honey did with their hugely successful yet ancient Illusion, which had bullet holes in the hull when they took on the job - is looked on along the West Coast as an almost sacred duty for serious sailors.

Thus from being someone from a cosy Irish sailing community who was making a leap into the dark in moving to the Coast, Ken Corry is now very much at home at the heart of Los Angeles sailing and its finest traditions. Rather than travelling to visit, he is the one to be visited – he has had Neill Love calling by, and when his mother Sheila arrived, they were able to get together with Ron Holland down from Vancouver, and his daughter Kelly.

And so far, he seems to have comfortably resisted any projects to make the LAYC the Western Station of the RCYC, but may well be open to the idea that the RCYC becomes the Eastern Station of the LAYC.

Sailing folk from several homes in Ken Corry’s home club are (left to right) Ken’s mother Sheila, Ron Holland down from Vancouver, Ken Corry in one of the places he knows best, and Ron Holland’s daughter Kelly.Sailing folk from several homes in Ken Corry’s home club are (left to right) Ken’s mother Sheila, Ron Holland down from Vancouver, Ken Corry in one of the places he knows best, and Ron Holland’s daughter Kelly.

Published in Cork Harbour

Not many were surprised when the Irish Sailing Youth National Championships, which have been taking place at the Royal Cork Yacht Club since Thursday, concluded early due to the landing of Storm Kathleen and a deteriorating forecast for the following day.

After four classes managed to complete their series earlier on Thursday, race management made the decision to abandon the remaining races for the safety of the sailors. 

Sean Evans, Irish Sailing High Performance Youth Development Manager, expressed his disappointment at the decision, stating, "It is with a heavy heart that race management has made the decision to cancel the remainder of the event due to the adverse weather. The safety of our sailors will always come first." 

Despite the cancellation, the one day of racing that did occur showcased an impressive level of talent, illustrating the bright future of Irish sailing. Talks from Faye St Leger, Development Strength and Conditioning Coach, and a Coaches' Development Conference were still scheduled to take place later in the day. 

The prizegiving event is scheduled to take place at 2:30 p.m., with Irish Sailing President John Twomey presenting the trophies. 

Irish Sailing Youth National Championships Final Results:

ILCA 6

Bobby Driscoll, Ballyholme Yacht Club
Andrew Kingston, Royal Cork Yacht Club
Lewis Thompson, Ballyhome Yacht Club

29ers

  1. Clementine Van Steenberg & Jessica Riordan, The National Yacht Club and The Royal St. George Yacht Club
  2. Oisin Pierse & Fionn Daly, Royal Cork Yacht Club
  3. Hugh Meaghar & Oisin Alexander, National Yacht Club

420

  1. Max Sweetman & Fionn Lynch, Waterford Harbour Sailing Club
  2. Cora McNaughton & Sean Cronin, Blessington Sailing Club
  3. Sean Lemonier & Killian Matthieu, Galway Bay Sailing Club

Opti

  1. Max O’Hare, Royal St. George Yacht Club and Malahide Yacht Club
  2. Patrick Fegan, Royal St George Yacht Club
  3. Juliet Ryan, Royal St. George Yacht Club, Malahide Yacht Club

Full results below

Published in Youth Sailing

The second day of racing at the 2024 Irish Sailing Youth National Championships at Crosshaven in Cork Harbour has been cancelled due to strong winds. 

Organisers completed a successful first day of races on Thursday for over 90 boats and more than 100 sailors, as Afloat reports here.

After a number of postponements this morning, Friday's racing was cancelled for all classes at lunchtime due to winds reaching over 30 mph.

Over 170 young sailors in six classes are set to compete in Ireland’s largest youth regatta, which was scheduled to continue this weekend.

However, the imminent arrival of Storm Kathleen, that has already altered other weekend sailing events, means organisers have deemed it 'unsafe to go on the water' for the rest of today or Saturday. 

'Based on current forecasts, all on-the-water activity is now postponed until Sunday 7 April', organisers note.

Bibs were also awarded to leading sailors after Day One's races with current positions standing:

ILCA 6

  1. Bobby Driscoll
  2. Andrew Kingston
  3. Lewis Thompson

29ers

  1. Clementine Van Steenberg & Jessica Riordan
  2. Oisin Pierse & Fionn Daly
  3. Hugh Maher & Oisin Alexander

420

  1. Max Sweetman & Fionn Lynch
  2. Cora McNaughton & Sean Cronin
  3. Sean Lemonier & Killian Matthieu
Published in Youth Sailing

Over 90 boats and more than 100 sailors competed on a wet opening Thursday at the Irish Sailing Youth National Championships ahead of Storm Kathleen's expected arrival in Cork Harbour this weekend.

The Royal Cork Yacht Club-hosted event saw three dinghy classes compete on one course—ILCA 6, 420, and 29er—while the Optimist class ran on a separate course.

Reigning world champion Clementine Van Steenberge of the National Yacht Club, sailing with new crew Jessica Riordan of the Royal St. Goerge Yacht Club, stamped their authority on the eight-boat 29er skiff fleet, winning two of the four races sailed to lead by seven points from Oisin Pierse and Fionn Daly on 13. Third is Hugh Meagher and Oisin Alexander on 16. 

With three wins from four races Max O'Hare of the Royal St. George Yacht Club leads the 38-boat Optimist class by seven points. Patrick Fegan lies second on 15 with last weekend's Brassed Off Cup winner at Howth, Juliet Ryan lying third. 

Belfast Lough's Bobby Driscoll has a three-point advantage at the top of the leaderboard after four races sailed in the 29-boat ILCA 6 class. The Ballyholme Yacht Club sailor won the first three races to be ahead of Andrew Kingston on 12 and Lewis Thompson on 20.

An ILCA 6 competitor completes a tack on the first day of the Irish Sailing Youth National Championships at Crosshaven in Cork HarbourAn ILCA 6 competitor completes a tack on the first day of the Irish Sailing Youth National Championships at Crosshaven in Cork Harbour

Waterford Harbour reigning Ulster champions Max Sweetman and Fionn Lynch lead by a point after four races sailed in the 16-boat 420 class from Cora McNaughton and Sean Cronin (BSC/MSC) on eight. Third is Galway Bay duo Sean Lemonier and Killian Mathieu on 10.

Sean Evans, High-Performance Development Manager for Irish Sailing, said, “The standard on the water was phenomenal, and it was obvious that a lot of hard work has gone in over the winter by these young sailors. I must congratulate the event committee for managing to run four races today, maximising the current sailable conditions ahead of storm Kathleen, which is forecast to hit our shores over the weekend. We will now look forward to the weekend hoping we can get in some more racing for the series.”

Racing is scheduled over the next three days.

Results below

Published in Youth Sailing
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Over 170 young sailors are set to compete in Ireland’s largest youth regatta, which starts today, April 4th at Crosshaven in Cork Harbour.

The 2024 Irish Sailing Youth National Championships, which will be hosted by the Royal Cork Yacht Club and sponsored by Waterman Kelly Consulting Engineers, is a four-day event that runs until April 7th.

The young sailors will compete for their chance to be noticed by Irish Sailing’s Youth Squad and Academy coaches, who are on the lookout for promising talent. The performance pathway programme offers an opportunity for hardworking sailors to enhance and develop their skills, allowing them to progress from junior and youth squads into senior development and the national team.

The Irish Sailing Youth National Championships is a unique event, bringing together different youth classes to compete, gain valuable experience on the water, and learn more about the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway Programme directly from the coaches. The host club is known for producing excellent youth sailors, including Irish Youth Sailor of the Year Ben O’Shaughnessy, and is home to current 49er campaigners Séafra Guilfoyle and Johnny Durcan.

The six classes competing in the championships have been identified as the best to facilitate progression through the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway: Optimist, Topper, ILCA 4, ILCA 6, 420s (above)and 29ers.The six classes competing in the championships have been identified as the best to facilitate progression through the Irish Sailing Performance Pathway: Optimist, Topper, ILCA 4, ILCA 6, 420s and 29ers Photo: Bob Bateman

Speaking about the event, Sean Evans, Irish Sailing Development Manager, said, “The Youth Nationals is a key event for those starting off their sailing career. It’s an opportunity for sailors from across the nation to test what they have been developing and perfecting within their clubs against the best competition. Regardless of where you are in your development, it’s a journey, and Irish Sailing’s youth and junior coaches will be out on the water and on the land to watch every start, tack, and gybe.”

The Irish Sailing Youth National Championships is the largest youth sailing event held in Ireland, and it provides a platform for young sailors to showcase their skills and compete against the best in the country. It promises to be an exciting and action-packed event, with the future stars of Irish sailing on full display.

Published in Youth Sailing

With just a fortnight to the first gun, confirmed entries for this year’s Waterman Kelly-sponsored Irish Sailing Youth National Championships in Cork Harbour have reached 165 sailors across the six competing dinghy classes.

While the April event is open to all, competitors are expected to be competent in sailing in a sustained fresh breeze and have experience competing in regional or national events for their chosen dinghy class within the last nine months.

The Irish Sailing Youth National Championships 2024 may form part of the selection trials for the 2024 World Sailing Youth Worlds, national squads, and IODAI team selection and are an indicator, among other events, for the Irish Sailing Academy.

As previous articles have highlighted, the Royal Cork Yacht Club will be hosting this year's event, and many members have been helping plan the activity for many months to ensure a successful and enjoyable event for travelling families.

The event will no doubt be an important warm up for August's European ILCA 6 Championships at Ballyholme Yacht Club in Northern Ireland which has already attracted sailors from 26 countries.

The early bird entry for the Youth Sailing Nationals closed at midnight on Friday, 15 March, but entry to the event remains open here.

Published in Youth Sailing

Three back-to-back races for the forty-nine boat J/70 fleet saw Anthony O'Leary's skippered 'Antix' succumb to a black flag penalty in race four of the Bacardi Cup in Miami, Florida on Friday.

Crewed by Ben Field, Harry Durcan and son Nicholas O'Leary, the foursome is the second Irish boat competing on Biscayne Bay, with another son, Peter O'Leary, sailing with Stephen Milne competing in the Star keelboat class.

The usual shifty breeze was around 8-10 knots with plenty of race track nuances.

The OCS penalty has not helped the overall standings with Royal Cork's Antix lying 32nd overall.

Laura Grondin’s ‘Dark Energy’ team stormed to the top of the leaderboard, from 13th at the start of the day, with scores of 2,1,5.

Brian Keane’s ‘Savasana’ also advance through to second overall, up from 7th, just one point adrift of Grondin. Margaret McKillen’s ‘Magatron’ remains in third overall.

The hot favourites on ‘Brutus III’ have failed to connect the dots in this series, although Charles Thompson’s team managed to win in the final race, giving some salvation to their otherwise challenging scorecard.

Provisional Results – Top 3 after Race 6

1. Laura Grondin / Taylor Canfield / Luke Muller / Malcolm Lamphere (USA 819) - 34 pts
2. Brian Keane / Thomas Barrows / Ron Weed / Conner Harding (USA 49) - 35 pts
3. Margaret McKillen / Orrin Star / Brian Kamilar / Dave Schreiner (USA 1523) – 45 pts

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Waterman Kelly Consulting Engineers has pledged its support for the upcoming Irish Youth Sailing Nationals, which is scheduled to be held at the Royal Cork Yacht Club in April.

The Cork Harbour competition is expected to draw around 200 sailors aged between the low to high teens from all over Ireland, who will compete in one of six dinghy classes.

Eric Waterman, Managing Director of Waterman Kelly Consulting Engineers, praised the event, stating, "We are delighted to be part of this event where the best of the best in Irish youth sailing will compete against each other over four days. Sustainability is very much to the fore at the event, and this is an area that Waterman Kelly places significant focus on when dealing with our clients."

The event is set to take place from April 4th to April 7th, and early bird entries will close on March 15th.

Those interested in participating can find more information on the Waterman Kelly Consulting Engineers website or by contacting [email protected] and entering the Irish Sailing Youth Nationals 2024 via the Entry Form on the Royal Cork Yacht Club website.

Event organiser for the Royal Cork, Tim McCarthy, expressed his delight at having a well-established business like Waterman Kelly Consulting Engineers supporting the event. "It is an opportunity to work with a company that shares many of the same values and helps profile all that is best about our sport in a positive manner," he said.

The Irish Sailing Youth National Championships are held in different locations around Ireland every April and are designed to showcase and develop youth sailing. It is billed as the 'premier event' for Irish youth sailors across a range of junior dinghy classes and attracts sailors aged in their early to late teens. While the event is open to all, it is expected that all competitors entering will be competent in sailing in a sustained fresh breeze and will have experienced competing in regional or National events for their chosen dinghy class within the last nine months.

Published in Royal Cork YC
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The Royal Cork Yacht Club is gearing up to host the 10th anniversary of the popular PY1000 dinghy race on Saturday, April 20th, 2024. The event, which has become a highlight of the club's calendar, is sponsored once again by Crosshaven House, a partnership that began in 2023.

The race will see Toppers and the RS Teras leading the charge out of the starting gates, heading for a turning mark at Coolmore House. The rest of the fleet will follow in hot pursuit.

This year's race will follow the same format as last year's, with boats starting in order of slowest to fastest. The first boat to cross the finishing line will be declared the winner, with placings on the water determining the final position. This format has proved popular with sailors and spectators alike, emulating the famous 'Bloody Mary' event held each year in London.

The PY1000 dinghy race is set to take place on high tide, and if weather conditions permit, the plan is to race in the river in front of Royal Cork Yacht Club Photo: Bob BatemanThe PY1000 dinghy race is set to take place on high tide, and if weather conditions permit, the plan is to race in the river in front of Royal Cork Yacht Club Photo: Bob Bateman

The winner of the 2023 event, Chris Bateman, was presented with the newly commissioned Crosshaven House PY1000 trophy and a prize of €700 by Stacey O'Sullivan of Crosshaven House.

This year's prize fund of €1,000 will be split among the top three finishers, with the winner receiving €700, second place receiving €200, and third place receiving €100. There will also be additional prizes for the youngest sailor, first female helm, and the oldest combined crew age.

The race is set to take place on high tide, and if weather conditions permit, the plan is to race in the river, providing a thrilling spectacle for spectators. So, dust off your boat, and get ready for an exciting day of sailing.

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Royal Cork Yacht Club Crosshaven, Co. Cork is all set to host the Youth Sailing Nationals from 4th to the 7th of April.

The event promises great sailing at Easter in Cork Harbour, and entry to the event is now open. Sailors in ILCA 6 & 4, 29er, 420, Topper, and Optimist can participate in the event under Principal Race Officer Anthony O'Leary.

This year, 210 sailors are expected to attend the event, and sailors are encouraged to enter early as places are limited. The event forms part of the selection trials for the 2024 World Sailing Youth Worlds, IODAI Team selection, and National Squads.

Ben O’Shaughnessy and Ethan Spain will be defending their 29er Youths title, while female European champions Alana Twomey and Lucia Cullen hope to top the podium.

U17 World Champion Sienna Wright will be in action in the ILCA6s in Cork Harbour in April U17 World Champion Sienna Wright will be in action in the ILCA6s in Cork Harbour in April 

In the ILCAs, Sienna Wright, who recently won the U17 ILCA worlds and was second overall in the ILCA 6 Youth worlds in Argentina, is expected to participate.

The Optimist fleet is also expected to be very strong, with more than just a title on the line, as these championships will finalise selection for the IODAI national team for 2024. Sailors are urged to refer to www.iodai.com for information about the IODAI selection policy and Optimist entry. 

With great sailing and tough competition, the Youth Nationals promises to be an exciting event. Don't delay, get your entry in now!

Published in Royal Cork YC
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