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Due to the weather forecast, both the Neptune and Commercial rowing regattas in Dublin have been cancelled. The organisers have cited strong winds of 45k/hr and gusts of 90k/ph expected to hit Islandbridge as the cause.

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Ireland has announced the names of the athletes who will represent the country at the upcoming Rowing World Cup. The racing event is scheduled to take place from April 12 to April 14 in Varese, Italy.  Antonio Maurogiovanni, the High-Performance Director of Rowing Ireland, revealed the selected crews.

The women's four crew includes Emily Hegarty from Skibbereen RC, Natalie Long from Lee Valley RC, Eimear Lambe from Old Collegians BC, and Imogen Magner from Carlow RCThe women's four crew includes Emily Hegarty from Skibbereen RC, Natalie Long from Lee Valley RC, Eimear Lambe from Old Collegians BC, and Imogen Magner from Carlow RC

The women's four crew includes Emily Hegarty from Skibbereen RC, Natalie Long from Lee Valley RC, Eimear Lambe from Old Collegians BC, and Imogen Magner from Carlow RC. On the other hand, the men's four crew consists of John Kearney from UCC RC, Andrew Sheehan from UCC RC, Jack Dorney from Shandon BC/Harvard, and Ronan Byrne from Shandon RC.

Aifric Keogh & Fiona Murtagh will race for Ireland in W2 at the Rowing World Cup in Italy in AprilAifric Keogh & Fiona Murtagh will race for Ireland in W2 at the Rowing World Cup in Italy in April

Fiona Murtagh from the University of Galway RC and Aifric Keogh from Gráinne Mhaol RC will represent Ireland in the Women's Pair (Qualified boat for Paris). Meanwhile, Nathan Timoney from Enniskillen Royal BC and Ross Corrigan from Portora BC will form the Men's Pair (Qualified boat for Paris). In the Men's Double (Qualified boat for Paris), Philip Doyle from Belfast BC and Daire Lynch from Clonmel RC will represent Ireland.

Philip Doyle from Belfast BC and Daire Lynch from Clonmel RC will race in the Men’s Double (Qualified Boat for Paris)Philip Doyle from Belfast BC and Daire Lynch from Clonmel RC will race in the Men’s Double (Qualified Boat for Paris)

Sanita Puspure from Old Collegians BC will be the sole representative for Ireland in the Women's Single category. Konan Pazzaia from Queen's University Belfast BC and Brian Colsh from University of Galway BC will represent Ireland in the Men's Single category.

Selected Irish Crews for 2024 World Cup:

Women’s Four

Emily Hegarty (Skibbereen RC)
Natalie Long (Lee Valley RC)
Eimear Lambe (Old Collegians BC)
Imogen Magner (Carlow RC)

Men’s Four

John Kearney (UCC RC)
Andrew Sheehan (UCC RC)
Jack Dorney (Shandon BC/Harvard)
Ronan Byrne (Shandon RC)

Women’s Pair (Qualified Boat for Paris)

Fiona Murtagh (University of Galway RC)
Aifric Keogh (Gráinne Mhaol RC)

Men’s Pair (Qualified Boat for Paris)

Nathan Timoney (Enniskillen Royal BC)
Ross Corrigan (Portora BC)

Men’s Double (Qualified Boat for Paris)

Philip Doyle (Belfast BC)
Daire Lynch (Clonmel RC)

Women’s Single

Sanita Puspure (Old Collegians BC)

Men’s Single

Konan Pazzaia (Queen’s University Belfast BC)
Brian Colsh (University of Galway BC)

More information regarding the 2024 World Cup can be found here

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Lurgan’s Linda Blakely aims to cross the treacherous 3,000-mile Atlantic Ocean in a 12-foot boat aptly named Ulster Warrior, reports the Sunday Life.

She will start 2024 attempting to break a world record for a female solo rower, which is 40 days and 19 hours, set by 35-year-old Englishwoman Victoria Evans in 2022. Linda, who will be 50 about halfway through the challenge aims to raise £100,000 for the charity Action Medical Research.

She plans to set off from Gran Canaria to St Lucia in the Caribbean on January 7, weather-permitting, and hopes to arrive in St Lucia 40 days later, where her brother Peter and his family will be there to welcome her ashore.

Linda lives in London, where she runs three homes for young people with special needs. In 2018, she became the first woman in the UK to summit both Everest and Lhotse within a day.

Other accolades are competition in Iron Man challenges and winning a silver medal in European championships in long-distance triathlons with Team GB.

She tells the Belfast Telegraph that her mission is to become the fastest woman in the world to cross the Atlantic alone. She explains: “When I first thought about doing it, the record was 49 days, which seemed to be there for the taking, but then Victoria (Evans) did it in 40 days. She set a tough benchmark. Until this year, I had never rowed before, but I have a great club in London, the Sons of the Thames, who have taken me under their wing and taught me how to row, and I’ve been doing some racing with them.”

More from Sunday Life here

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Ireland's rowing team has made history at the 2023 World Rowing Championships, finishing the competition with four medals and securing seven crews for the Paris 2024 event. This marks the most crews that Ireland has ever qualified for at the World Championships, with only four crews qualifying during the Tokyo cycle. 

Although some crews did not qualify, they still have a chance at the Final Qualification Regatta in May. One of the highlights of the event was Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch's bronze medal win in the men's double. The duo started slow and were at the back of the pack in the first 1000 metres. However, they made a strong comeback and secured the bronze medal, racing right to the line with the Croatian double and coming in just one second behind the Sinkovic's. 

Alison Bergin and Zoe Hyde, the young women's double, also put in a commendable performance, managing to stay at the top of the pack throughout the race and finishing in fourth place. They missed out on a podium finish by just one and a half seconds, but their impressive performance has marked them as a crew to watch in the future. 

This historic week for Irish rowing has seen incredible racing, with the team's eye now firmly set on the Paris event next year. The team's performance has demonstrated that they are on the up, and the future looks bright for Irish rowing.

Day 7 Results

Men's Double A Final -> BRONZE
Women's Double A Final - > 4th

Overall Results
Lightweight Men's Double -> GOLD and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Lightweight Women's Scull -> GOLD
Men's Pair -> BRONZE and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Men's Double -> BRONZE and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Women's Pair -> 4th and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Women's Double -> 4th and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
PR2 Mixed Double -> 5th and PARALYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Lightweight women's Double -> 1st B Final and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
W4- -> 3rd B Final
M4x -> 1st C Final
M4- -> 3rd C Final
LM1x -> 5th D Final

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Irish crews have secured two more medals and one more Paris 2024 qualification on Day 7 of the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia. This brings Ireland's total to seven Paris 2024 qualifications, marking the largest number of qualifications in Rowing Ireland's history.

Lightweight Men's Double Scull World Champions Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan have defended their title for another year, clinching gold with another dominant performance. Despite the Swiss taking an early lead, McCarthy and O'Donovan showed their strength in the second half of the race, crossing the finish line ahead of Switzerland and Italy. This marks their third consecutive World Championship win.

A third consecutive World Championship win for Lightweight Men's Double Scullers Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'DonovanA third consecutive World Championship win for Lightweight Men's Double Scullers Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan

Lightweight Men's Double Scull World defending Champions Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan top the podium at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, SerbiaLightweight Men's Double Scull World defending Champions Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan top the podium at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia

Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan from Enniskillen secured another medal for Ireland with a bronze in the Men's pair. They led the race for the first half, taking the Swiss and Great Britain by surprise. Although favourites for the gold medal, Tom George and Ollie Wynne-Griffith from GB came back in the third quarter of the race and battled down to the line with Timoney and Corrigan for second place. In the end, Switzerland took the lead, and Ireland just missed out on the surge and had to settle for the bronze medal.

Bronze medalists - Ross Corrigan and Nathan Timoney with coach Nicolo Maurogiovanni and Rowing Ireland High Performance Director Antonio Maurogiovanni Bronze medalists - Ross Corrigan and Nathan Timoney with coach Nicolo Maurogiovanni and Rowing Ireland High Performance Director Antonio Maurogiovanni 

Aoife Casey and Margaret Cremen have qualified the Lightweight Women's Double for Paris 2024, winning the B final. Though nerves were high before they took to the water, Casey and Cremen remained cool and collected, finishing with clear water over the field. They finished the World Championships in seventh place and secured a spot for next year.

Aoife Casey and Margaret Cremen have qualified the Lightweight Women's Double for Paris 2024, winning the B finalAoife Casey and Margaret Cremen have qualified the Lightweight Women's Double for Paris 2024, winning the B final and below pictured with family in Serbia

In the PR2 Mix2x, Katie O'Brien and Steven McGowan took fifth place in the world. After qualifying for the Paralympics earlier in the week, they had a bit of a rough start when they caught a crab in the second half of the race. However, they quickly regained their composure and finished strong.

"This brings Ireland's total to seven Paris 2024 qualifications, marking the largest number of qualifications in Rowing Ireland's history"

Aifric Keogh and Fiona Murtagh just missed out on a podium finish, coming in fourth place. Though they fought hard to get into medal position in the last 500 meters, they were narrowly beaten by crews from the Netherlands, Australia, and Romania.

Eimear Lambe, Sanita Puspure, Imogen Lambe, and Natalie Long finished in third place in the B final of the women's four. Though they were hot on the heels of the crew from Denmark, New Zealand claimed the qualification position in the end.

Finally, John Kearney, Jack Dorney, Adam Browne, and Fionnán McQuillan-Tolan finished in third place in the C final of the men's four. Despite starting from the back of the pack, they showed incredible perseverance in the last 500 meters and finished nearly neck and neck with the Chinese four. Nevertheless, China claimed second position across the line.

Overall, it was an impressive showing for the Irish crews, who proved their strength and skill on the international stage.

Day 7 Results

Lightweight Men's Double A Final -> GOLD
Men['s Pair A Final -> BRONZE
Lightweight Women's Double B Final ->1st and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Women's Pair A Final -> 4th
PR2 Mixed Double A Final -> 5th
Women's Four B Final -> 3rd
Men's Quad C Final -> 1st
Men's Four C Final -> 3rd

Sunday Schedule (IST)

12:39pm - Men's Double A Final
12:54pm - Women's Double A Final

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Siobhán McCrohan, a member of the Tribesmen Rowing Club in Ireland, secured a gold medal in the lightweight women's sculls final at the World Rowing Championships held in Belgrade, Serbia. McCrohan, aged 36, faced stiff competition from Mexican Kenia Lechuga and American Sophia Luwis, but her outstanding performance earned her the top spot on the podium. 

Despite the gruelling conditions in Belgrade, McCrohan executed her race plan to perfection. She paced herself in the early stages of the race while Martine Veldhuis of the Netherlands took an early lead. By the 500m mark, McCrohan had settled into third place behind Veldhuis and Lechuga, with the Dutch women already being reeled in. 

McCrohan improved to second place at the halfway point, sitting on the shoulder of Lechuga, just 0.27 behind the Mexican as Veldhuis was unable to keep pace and dropped out of the reckoning. Luwis then forced her way into the conversation, putting pressure on McCrohan, who kept her cool and stuck to her race plan, waiting for her moment to attack as she, Veldhuis, and Luwis pulled away from the chasing pack. 

McCrohan made her move as the scullers passed the 1500m mark. She upped her work rate and, with 300m to go, overtook Veldhuis, never looking back. With clear, calm water in front of her, she extended her lead in the closing stages, pulling away from Lechuga and Luwis, leaving the Mexican to win the battle for silver. 

McCrohan finished the race in 8:47.96, securing her first world championship gold medal after returning to representing Ireland this summer following a seven-year absence. Although she finished just off the podium in June's European Championships, she claimed world glory in her first season back in the boat, albeit in a non-Olympic class. 

"I only really came back to proper training in the winter of this season, so it's been a good comeback!" McCrohan told RTÉ Sport. "It wasn't so much that I made a decision that I should come back; it was that I couldn't stay away any longer." 

McCrohan's gold medal is a significant achievement for the Tribesmen Rowing Club member, who is traditionally used to the fast-flowing waters of the River Corrib. Although she had to face offshore winds in Belgrade, she took them in her stride, saying, "We all have to row in the same conditions, so it's worth noting that the race just takes longer." 

McCrohan's victory adds to the success of the Irish team at the World Rowing Championships. Both the men's and women's double sculls crews secured their boats' places at Paris 2024 for Ireland.

Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch finished just over a second behind the Croatian boat in their semi-final, while Alison Bergin and Zoe Hyde were also second, closely behind Americans Kristina Wagner and Sophia Vitas. 

While Jake McCarthy finished fifth in the lightweight men's single sculls D Final, McCrohan's gold medal will undoubtedly be a highlight of Ireland's performance at this year's championships.

Watch the World Rowing Championships on Saturday and Sunday from 12 pm on the RTE News Channel and RTE Player.

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Three Irish rowing crews have qualified for the A and B finals at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia, and secured their spots at the Paris Olympics next summer.

Irish Women's Pair Aifric Keogh and Fiona Murtagh. With a second-place finish, the two Galway rowers are into the A Final. Murtagh and Keogh have shown good speed throughout this Championships and will be leaving it all on the line this Saturday in the hopes of making it on to that podium. at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, SerbiaIrish Women's Pair Aifric Keogh and Fiona Murtagh. With a second-place finish, the two Galway rowers are into the A Final. Murtagh and Keogh have shown good speed throughout this Championships and will be leaving it all on the line this Saturday in the hopes of making it on to that podium. at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia

Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh put in an impressive performance to secure a women's pair spot for Ireland. The duo finished second in their semi-final, just behind the Romanian pair of Roxana Anghel and Ioana Vrinceanu.

22 year old Nathan Timoney and 24 year old Ross Corrigan have been on top form this week and have today qualified a men's pair for Ireland at Paris 2024. Timoney and Corrigan grew up rowing together with Enniskillen Royal BC in Fermanagh and are putting themselves up there with the top crews here at the World Championships. Ireland went out hard and held second position right from the start. With South Africa hot on their heels coming into the final sprint, they took it up another gear finishing with the fastest final 500. Their second place result sends them through to Saturday's A Final where they'll race the best of the best.22 year old Nathan Timoney and 24 year old Ross Corrigan have been on top form this week and have today qualified a men's pair for Ireland at Paris 2024. Timoney and Corrigan grew up rowing together with Enniskillen Royal BC in Fermanagh and are putting themselves up there with the top crews here at the World Championships. Ireland went out hard and held second position right from the start. With South Africa hot on their heels coming into the final sprint, they took it up another gear finishing with the fastest final 500. Their second place result sends them through to Saturday's A Final where they'll race the best of the best.

Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan also secured a men's pair spot for Ireland at Paris 2024. The pair came in second in their semi-final, with South Africa hot on their heels in the final sprint.

Reigning Olympic and World Champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy have secured a spot at Paris for the lightweight men's double. Making it look easy, O'Donovan and McCarthy held their composure through the first half of the race, passing the first marker in fifth place and the halfway mark in second place. Relying on their incredible strength and fitness, they were able to focus on their own race and one by one came through the other crews. In the end they finished with clear water ahead of the field with Czechia and Norway coming in behind them to take the remaining two spots to the A Final.Reigning Olympic and World Champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy have secured a spot at Paris for the lightweight men's double. Making it look easy, O'Donovan and McCarthy held their composure through the first half of the race, passing the first marker in fifth place and the halfway mark in second place. Relying on their incredible strength and fitness, they were able to focus on their own race and one by one came through the other crews. In the end they finished with clear water ahead of the field with Czechia and Norway coming in behind them to take the remaining two spots to the A Final

Reigning Olympic and World Champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy secured a spot in the lightweight men's double, dominating their semi-final and finishing with clear water ahead of the field.

However, the lightweight women's double of Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey narrowly missed out on an A final spot and will race in the B final on Saturday.

Eimear Lambe, Sanita Puspure, Imogen Magner, and Natalie Long finished in fifth place in the women's four, sending them through to the B final.

Siobhán McCrohan put in a stellar performance in the lightweight women's scull, winning her A/B semi-final and securing a place in the A final.

Tribesmen's Siobhán McCrohan is into the lightweight women's scull A Final after a win in her A/B Semi. Handling the tough conditions like a pro, McCrohan sailed over the waves and held a consistent speed throughout the race. Moving into the leading position in the third quarter, there was no looking back as she continued to pull away from the other crews. She will race the A Final tomorrow afternoon where she will be looking for a place on the podium.Tribesmen's Siobhán McCrohan is into the lightweight women's scull A Final after a win in her A/B Semi. Handling the tough conditions like a pro, McCrohan sailed over the waves and held a consistent speed throughout the race. Moving into the leading position in the third quarter, there was no looking back as she continued to pull away from the other crews. She will race the A Final tomorrow afternoon where she will be looking for a place on the podium.

Siobhán McCrohan in the lightweight women's scull at the World Rowing Championships in Bled, Slovenia

Jake McCarthy will compete in the D final of the lightweight men's scull against New Zealand, Norway, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Finland.

All six crews have done Ireland proud, and rowing fans will be eagerly anticipating their performances in the A and B finals.

Day 5 Results (Irish interest)
Women's Pair A/B Semi 2nd -> A Final and Olympic Qualification
Men's Pair A/B Semi 2nd -> A Final and Olympic Qualification
Lightweight Men's Double A/B Semi 1st -> A Final and Olympic Qualification
Lightweight Women's Double A/B Semi 4th -> B Final
Women's Four A/B Semi 5th -> B Final
Lightweight Women's Scull A/B Semi 1st -> A Final
Lightweight Men's Scull A/B Semi 6th -> D Final

Friday Schedule (IST)
9:45am - Men's Double A/B Semi
9:55am - Women's Double A/B Semi
12:05pm - Lightweight Men's D Final
13:15pm - Lightweight Women's A Final

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Irish rowers are making waves at the ongoing World Rowing Championships in Serbia, with three more crews advancing to the A/B Semi-finals and one step closer to the Paris 2024 Olympics.

The lightweight men's double of Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy left no doubt in the quarterfinals, finishing in style with clear water ahead of the remaining boats. This win ensures their spot in the A/B Semis tomorrow with the fastest time.

Irish M2 pair Ross Corrigan and Nathan Timoney at the World Rowing Championships in SerbiaIrish M2 pair Ross Corrigan and Nathan Timoney at the World Rowing Championships in Serbia

Birthday boy Nathan Timoney and his pair partner Ross Corrigan also secured a place in the top 12 men's pairs, while the men's double of Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch also advanced to the A/B Semis.

The men's double of Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch advanced to the A/B Semis at the World Rowing Championships in SerbiaThe men's double of Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch advanced to the A/B Semis at the World Rowing Championships in Serbia

Skibbereen's Jake McCarthy finished fifth in the quarterfinal of the lightweight men's scull, sending him through to the C/D Semi-final. However, it was not enough to secure him a place in the A/B Semis.

Jake McCarthy finished fifth in the quarterfinal of the lightweight men's scull, sending him through to the C/D Semi-final at the World Rowing Championships in SerbiaJake McCarthy finished fifth in the quarterfinal of the lightweight men's scull, sending him through to the C/D Semi-final at the World Rowing Championships in Serbia

The Irish crews will face tough competition from Mexico, Poland, Norway, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Norway, Spain, Croatia, New Zealand, and Germany in the upcoming rounds. With windy conditions forecasted for tomorrow, the race schedule has been moved forward to ensure fair competition.

The Irish rowers have a bright chance to qualify for the Paris 2024 Olympics, and the upcoming races promise to be exciting for Irish fans.

Wednesday Results (Irish interest)
Lightweight Men's Scull Quarterfinal 5th -> C/D Semi
Lightweight Men's Double Quarterfinal 1st -> A/B Semi
Men's Pair Quarterfinal 2nd -> A/B Semi
Men's Double Quarterfinal 2nd -> A/B Semi

Thursday Schedule (IST)
8:35am - Women's Pair A/B Semi
9:05am - Men's Pair A/B Semi
9:25am - Lightweight Women's Double A/B Semi
9:35am - Lightweight Men's Double A/B Semi
10:05am - Women's Four A/B Semi
11:35am - Lightweight Women's Scull A/B Semi
14:25pm - Lightweight Men's Scull C/D Semi

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Galway Rowing Rowing Club rowers Katie O'Brien and Steven McGowan have secured Ireland's first boat for the upcoming Paralympic Games in Paris 2024.

The duo competed in the PR2 mixed double at the World Rowing Championships and emerged victorious, earning the sole qualifying position for the 2024 Paralympics.

It's been 11 years since Ireland has had a crew compete in the Paralympics, with the PR3 mixed coxed four in London 2012. But O'Brien and McGowan's inspiring performance has ensured that the country will be represented once again next year.

Katie O'Brien had been unable to find a double partner prior to the Tokyo Olympics, but she finally realized her dream at this year's World Championships. Meanwhile, Steven McGowan, who only picked up the sport less than two years ago, has made remarkable progress to compete at the level he is now.

The Irish duo had a strong start in their heat and were right in the mix with World Cup III bronze medallists Michal Gadowski and Jolanta Majka of Poland. The 2022 World Champions, Ukraine, were unable to keep up with the pace that was set and struggled to move into the top grouping. With only one crew to progress straight into the A Final, O'Brien and McGowan had to make a move to put themselves in the lead spot. And through the third 500m, Ireland was the fastest boat on the water, pushing their bow ahead of Poland. In the end, O'Brien and McGowan secured the ticket to Paris, leaving no chance for their competitors to catch up.

Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh, another Galway pairing, also performed remarkably in the women's pair repechage. With an incredible start, they led the field by over two seconds by the first 500m mark. Italy's Aisha Rocek and Alice Codato tried to catch up with Fiona and Aifric, but they failed to break their lead. With their first-place finish, the Irish duo qualified for the A/B Semis on Thursday morning.

However, the men's four of John Kearney, Jack Dorney, Adam Murphy, and Fionnán McQuillan-Tolan missed out on the A/B Semis. They will race the C Final after finishing fifth in their repechage. The crew had a promising start, sitting in second place through the halfway point. But all the crews stayed in contention, and coming into the last quarter, Ireland had moved back to fifth place. There wasn't enough left to push into the top three for a spot in the A/B Semi.

In the men's quad, Brian Colsh, Andrew Sheehan, Ronan Byrne, and Konan Pazzaia had a fourth-place finish in their repechage, missing out on the A/B Semi. As the race progressed, Ireland made their way closer to the top three, and in the final 500m, they were the fastest boat on the water. But it wasn't enough to edge them ahead of the American crew.

Overall, it was a great day for Irish rowing, with O'Brien and McGowan securing the first boat for the country in the 2024 Paralympics. The country will be looking forward to more success in the coming days of the World Rowing Championships.

Day 3 Results (Irish interest)

PR2 Mixed Double Heat 1st -> A Final and Paralympic Qualification
Women's Pair Repechage 1st -> A/B Semi
Men's Four Repechage 5th -> C Final
Men's Quad Repechage 4th -> C Final

Wednesday Schedule (IST)
11:43am - Lightweight Men's Scull Quarterfinal
11:50am - Lightweight Men's Double Quarterfinal
12:18pm - Men's Pair Quarterfinal
12:53pm - Men's Double Quarterfinal

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Seven Irish crews were afloat for the second day of the 2023 World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia, with impressive performances across multiple events.

The women's pair of Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh secured a place in the repechage after finishing second in their heat, while Cork's Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey advanced directly to the A/B Semi of the lightweight women's double.

Cork's Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey were racing in the second day of the 2023 World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, SerbiaCork's Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey were racing in the second day of the 2023 World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia

Alison Bergin and Zoe Hyde won their heat in the women's double, securing a place in the A/B Semi and giving themselves a chance to qualify for the Paris 2024 Olympics.

The women's pair of Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh secured a place in the repechage after finishing second in their heatThe women's pair of Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh secured a place in the repechage after finishing second in their heat

The women's four team of Eimear Lambe, Sanita Puspure, Imogen Magner, and Natalie Long also made it through to the A/B Semi, finishing third in their heat.

However, the men's four and quad teams will need to fight their way through the repechage to progress.

Despite finishing sixth in their heat, John Kearney, Jack Dorney, Adam Murphy, and Fionnán McQuillan-Tolan will race again in the repechage for a chance to make the A/B Semi.

Similarly, the men's quad of Brian Colsh, Andrew Sheehan, Ronan Byrne, and Konan Pazzaia finished sixth in their heat but will have another opportunity to qualify for the Semi in the repechage.

Lightweight sculler Jake McCarthy of SkibbereenLightweight sculler Jake McCarthy of Skibbereen

Skibbereen's Jake McCarthy secured a place in the quarterfinals of the lightweight sculler event after winning his repechage.

Day 2 Results (Irish interest)
W2- Heat 2nd -> Repechage
LW2x Heat 2nd -> A/B Semi
W2x Heat 1st -> A/B Semi
W4- Heat 3rd -> A/B Semi
M4- Heat 6th -> Repechage
M4x Heat 6th -> Repechage
LM1x Repechage 1st -> Quarterfinal

Tuesday Schedule (IST)
9:30am - PR2 Mix2x Heat
10:40am - W2- Repechage
11:15am - M4- Repechage
11:36am - M4x Repechage

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General Information on using Waterways Ireland inland navigations

Safety on the Water

All users of the navigations are strongly recommended to make themselves aware of safety on the water for whatever activity they are involved in and to read the advice offered by the various governing bodies and by:

The Dept. of Transport, Ireland: www.gov.ie/transport and The Maritime and Coastguard Agency, UK, The RNLI – Water Safety Ireland for information in terms of drowning prevention and water safety.

Registration of Vessels

All vessels using the Shannon Navigation, which includes the Shannon-Erne Waterways and the Erne System must be registered with Waterways Ireland. Only open undecked boats with an engine of 15 horsepower or less on the Shannon Navigation, and vessels of 10 horsepower or less on the Erne System, are exempt. Registration is free of charge.

Craft registration should be completed online at: https://www.waterwaysireland.org/online-services/craft-registration

Permits for use of the Grand and Royal Canals and the Barrow Navigation

All vessels using the Grand and Royal Canals and the Barrow Navigation must display appropriate valid Permit(s) i.e A Combined Mooring and Passage Permit (€126) and if not intending to move every five days, an Extended Mooring Permit (€152).

Permit applications should be completed online at: https://www.waterwaysireland.org/online-services/canal-permits

Passage on the Royal and Grand Canals – Dublin Area

For boat passage through the locks east of Lock 12 into / out of Dublin on either the Royal or Grand Canals, Masters are requested to contact the Waterways Ireland Eastern Regional Office (M-F 9.30am-4.30pm) on tel: +353(0)1 868 0148 or email [email protected] prior to making passage in order to plan the necessary lock-keeping assistance arrangements.

On the Grand Canal a minimum of two days notice prior to the planned passage should be given, masters should note that with the exception of pre-arranged events, a maximum of 2 boats per day will be taken through the locks, travelling either east or west.

Movements in or out of the city will be organised by prior arrangement to take place as a single movement in one day. Boaters will be facilitated to travel the system if their passage is considered to be safe by Waterways Ireland and they have the valid permit(s) for mooring and passage.

Newcomen Lifting Bridge

On the Royal Canal two weeks’ notice of bridge passage (Newcomen Lifting Bridge) is required for the pre-set lift date, and lock assistance will then also be arranged. A minimum of 2 boats is required for a bridge lift to go ahead.

Waterways Ireland Eastern Regional Office (Tel: +353(0)1 868 0148 or [email protected] ) is the point of contact for the bridge lift.

A maximum number of boats passing will be implemented to keep to the times given above for the planned lifts (16 for the Sat / Sun lifts & 8 for the weekday lifts). Priority will be given on a first come first served basis.

On day of lift, boaters and passengers must follow guidance from Waterways Ireland staff about sequence of passage under bridge & through Lock 1, and must remain within signed and designated areas.

Events Held on the Waterways

All organised events taking place on the waterways must have the prior approval of Waterways Ireland. This is a twelve week process and application forms must be accompanied with the appropriate insurance, signed indemnity and risk assessment. The application should be completed on the Waterways Ireland events page at :

https://www.waterwaysireland.org/online-services/event-approval

Time Limits on Mooring in Public Harbours

On the Shannon Navigation and the Shannon-Erne Waterway craft may berth in public harbours for five consecutive days or a total of seven days in any one month.

On the Erne System, revised Bye Laws state that: No master or owner shall permit a vessel, boat or any floating or sunken object to remain moored at or in the vicinity of any public mooring, including mooring at any other public mooring within 3 kilometres of that location, for more than 3 consecutive days and shall not moor at that same mooring or any other public mooring within 3 kilometres of that location within the following 3 consecutive days without prior permission by an authorised official.

Winter Mooring on the Shannon Navigation and Shannon Erne Waterway

Winter mooring may be availed of by owners during the period 1 Nov to 31 Mar by prior arrangement and payment of a charge of €63.50 per craft. Craft not availing of Winter Mooring must continue to comply with the “5 Day Rule”. Winter Mooring applications should be completed online at : https://www.waterwaysireland.org/online-services/winter-moorings-booking

Owners should be aware that electricity supply and water supply to public moorings is disconnected for the winter months. This is to protect against frost damage, to reduce running costs and to minimise maintenance requirements during the winter months.

Vessel owners are advised that advance purchasing of electricity on the power bollards leading up to the disconnection date should be minimal. Electricity credit existing on the bollards will not be recoverable after the winter decommissioning date. Both services will be reinstated prior to the commencement of the next boating season.

Smart Cards

Waterways Ireland smart cards are used to operate locks on the Shannon Erne Waterway, to access the service blocks, to use the pump-outs along the navigations, to avail of electrical power at Waterways Ireland jetties.

Berthing in Public Harbours

Masters are reminded of the following:

  • Equip their vessel with mooring lines of appropriate length and strength and only secure their craft to mooring bollards and cleats provided for this purpose.
  • Ensure the available berth is suitable to the length of your vessel, do not overhang the mooring especially on finger moorings on floating pontoon moorings.
  • Ensure mooring lines, electric cables and fresh water hoses do not create a trip hazard on public jetties for others users.
  • Carry sufficient fenders to prevent damage to your own vessel, other vessels and WI property.
  • Allow sufficient space between your vessel and the vessel ahead /astern (c.1m) for fire safety purposes and /or to recover somebody from the water.
  • Do not berth more than two vessels side by side and ensure there is safe access/egress at all times between vessels and onto the harbour itself.
  • Do not berth in such a way to prevent use of harbour safety ladders, slipways or pump-outs.
  • Do not allow the bow of your vessel to overhang the walkway of a floating mooring thus creating a hazard for others with an overhanging anchor or bow fendering.
  • Animals are not allowed to be loose or stray at any time.
  • Harbour and jetty infrastructure such as railings, power pedestals, fresh water taps, electric light poles, safety bollards, ladders etc are not designed for the purpose of mooring craft , they will not bear the strain of a vessel and will be damaged.
  • At Carrybridge on the Erne System, Masters of vessels are not permitted to use stern on mooring. Masters of vessels must use the mooring fingers for mooring of vessels and for embarkation / disembarkation from vessels.

Passenger Vessel Berths

Masters of vessels should not berth on passenger vessel berths where it is indicated that an arrival is imminent. Passenger vessels plying the navigations generally only occupy the berths to embark and disembark passengers and rarely remain on the berths for extended periods or overnight.

Lock Lead-in Jetties

Lead-in jetties adjacent to the upstream and downstream gates at lock chambers are solely for the purpose of craft waiting to use the lock and should not be used for long term berthing.

Vessel Wake

Vessel wake, that is, the wave generated by the passage of the boat through the water, can sometimes be large, powerful and destructive depending on the hull shape and engine power of the vessel. This wake can be detrimental to other users of the navigation when it strikes their craft or inundates the shoreline or riverbank. Masters are requested to frequently look behind and check the effect of their wake / wash particularly when passing moored vessels, on entering harbours and approaching jetties and to be aware of people pursuing other activities such as fishing on the riverbank.

Speed Restriction

A vessel or boat shall not be navigated on the Shannon Navigation at a speed in excess of 5 kph when within 200 metres of a bridge, quay, jetty or wharf, when in a harbour or canal or when passing within 100 metres of a moored vessel or boat.

Vessels navigating the Shannon-Erne Waterway should observe the general 5 kph speed limit which applies along the waterway. This is necessary in order to prevent damage to the banks caused by excessive wash from vessels.

Vessels navigating the Erne System should observe the statutory 5kt / 6mph / 10kph speed limit areas.

A craft on the Royal and Grand canals shall not be navigated at a speed in excess of 6km per hour.

A craft on the Barrow Navigation shall not be navigated at a speed in excess of 11km per hour except as necessary for safe navigation in conditions of fast flow.

Bank Erosion

Narrow sections of all the navigations are particularly prone to bank erosion due to the large wash generated by some craft. Masters are requested to be vigilant and to slow down to a speed sufficient to maintain steerage when they observe the wash of their craft inundating the river banks.

Unusual Waterborne Activity

Unusual waterborne vessels may be encountered from time to time, such as, hovercraft or amphibious aircraft / seaplanes. Masters of such craft are reminded to apply the normal “Rule of the Road” when they meet conventional craft on the water and to allow extra room to manoeuvre in the interest of safety.

Sailing Activity

Mariners will encounter large numbers of sailing dinghies from late June to August in the vicinity of Lough Derg, Lough Ree and Lower Lough Erne. Sailing courses are marked by yellow buoys to suit weather conditions on the day. Vessels should proceed at slow speed and with due caution and observe the rules of navigation when passing these fleets, as many of the participants are junior sailors under training.

Rowing

Mariners should expect to meet canoes and vessels under oars on any part of the navigations, but more so in the vicinity of Athlone, Carrick-on-Shannon, Coleraine, Enniskillen and Limerick. Masters are reminded to proceed at slow speed and especially to reduce their wash to a minimum when passing these craft as they can be easily upset and swamped due to their very low freeboard and always be prepared to give way in any given traffic situation.

Canoeing

Canoeing is an adventure sport and participants are strongly recommended to seek the advice of the sport’s governing bodies i.e Canoeing Ireland and the Canoe Association of Northern Ireland, before venturing onto the navigations.

Persons in charge of canoes are reminded of the inherent danger to these craft associated with operating close to weirs, sluice gates, locks and other infrastructure particularly when rivers are in flood and large volumes of water are moving through the navigations due to general flood conditions or very heavy localised precipitation e.g. turbulent and broken water, stopper waves. Shooting weirs is prohibited without prior permission of Waterways Ireland.

Canoeists should check with lockkeepers prior entering a lock to ensure passage is done in a safe manner. Portage is required at all unmanned locks.

Canoe Trail Network – "Blueways"

Masters of powered craft are reminded that a canoe trail network is being developed across all navigations and to expect more organised canoeing along these trails necessitating slow speed and minimum wash when encountering canoeists, rowing boats etc

Rockingham and Drummans Island Canals – Lough Key

It is expected that work on Rockingham and Drummans Island Canals on Lough Key will be completed in 2021. Access to these canals will be for non-powered craft only, eg canoes, kayaks, rowing boats.

Fast Powerboats and Personal Watercraft (Jet Skis)

Masters of Fast Powerboats (speed greater than 17kts) and Personal Watercraft (i.e.Jet Skis) are reminded of the inherent dangers associated with high speed on the water and especially in the confines of small bays and narrow sections of the navigations. Keeping a proper look-out, making early alterations to course and /or reducing speed will avoid conflict with slower vessels using the navigation. Personal Watercraft are not permitted to be used on the canals.

Towing Waterskiers, Wakeboarders, Doughnuts etc

Masters of vessels engaged in any of these activities are reminded of the manoeuvring constraints imposed upon their vessel by the tow and of the added responsibilities that they have to the person(s) being towed. These activities should be conducted in areas which are clear of conflicting traffic. It is highly recommended that a person additional to the master be carried to act as a “look-out” to keep the tow under observation at all times.

Prohibition on Swimming

Swimming in the navigable channel, particularly at bridges, is dangerous and is prohibited due to the risk of being run over by a vessel underway in the navigation.

Age Restrictions on operating of powered craft

In the Republic of Ireland, Statutory Instrument 921 of 2005 provides the legal requirements regarding the minimum age for operating of powered craft. The Statutory Instrument contains the following requirements:

- The master or owner of a personal watercraft or a fast power craft shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that a person who has not attained the age of 16 years does not operate or control the craft

- The master or owner of a pleasure craft powered by an engine with a rating of more than 5 horse power or 3.7 kilowatts shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that a person who has not attained the age of 12 years does not operate or control the craft.

Lifejackets and Personal Flotation Devices (PFDs)

Lifejackets and PFD’s are the single most important items of personal protective equipment to be used on a vessel and should be worn especially when the vessel is being manoeuvred such as entering / departing a lock, anchoring, coming alongside or departing a jetty or quayside.

In the Republic of Ireland, Statutory Instrument 921 of 2005 provides the legal requirements regarding the wearing of Personal Flotation Devices. The Statutory Instrument contains the following requirements:

- The master or owner of a pleasure craft (other than a personal watercraft) shall ensure, that there are, at all times on board the craft, sufficient suitable personal flotation devices for each person on board.

- A person on a pleasure craft (other than a personal watercraft) of less than 7 metres length overall shall wear a suitable personal flotation device while on board an open craft or while on the deck of decked craft, other than when the craft is made fast to the shore or at anchor.

- The master or owner of a pleasure craft (other than a personal watercraft) shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that a person who has not attained the age of 16 years complies with paragraph above.

- The master or owner of a pleasure craft (other than a personal watercraft), shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that a person who has not attained the age of 16 years wears a suitable personal flotation device while on board an open craft or while on the deck of a decked craft other than when it is made fast to the shore or at anchor.

- The master or owner of a pleasure craft (other than a personal watercraft) shall take all reasonable steps to ensure that a person wears a suitable personal flotation device, at all times while – (a) being towed by the craft, (b) on board a vessel or object of any kind which is being towed by the craft.

Further information is available at: http://www.irishstatutebook.ie/eli/2005/si/921/made/en/print

Firing Range Danger Area – Lough Ree

The attention of mariners is drawn to the Irish Defence Forces Firing Range situated in the vicinity of buoys No’s 2 and 3, on Lough Ree on the Shannon Navigation. This range is used regularly for live firing exercises, throughout the year, all boats and vessels should stay clear of the area marked with yellow buoys showing a yellow "X" topmark and displaying the word "Danger".

Shannon Navigation, Portumna Swing Bridge Tolls

No attempt should be made by Masters’ of vessels to pay the bridge toll while making way through the bridge opening. Payment will only be taken by the Collector from Masters when they are secured alongside the jetties north and south of the bridge.

Navigating from Killaloe to Limerick on the Shannon Navigation

The navigation from Killaloe to Limerick involves passage through Ardnacrusha locks, the associated headrace and tailrace and the Abbey River into Limerick City. Careful passage planning is required to undertake this voyage. Considerations include: lock passage at Ardnacrusha, water flow in the navigation, airdraft under bridges on Abbey River in Limerick, state of tide in Limerick

Users are advised to contact the ESB Ardnacrusha hydroelectric power station (00353 (0)87 9970131) 48 hours in advance of commencing their journey to book passage through the locks at Ardnacrusha. It is NOT advised to undertake a voyage if more than one turbine is operating (20MW), due to the increased velocity of flow in the navigation channel, which can be dangerous. To ascertain automatically in real time how many turbines are running, users can phone +353 (0)87 6477229.

For safety reasons the ESB has advised that only powered craft with a capacity in excess of 5 knots are allowed to enter Ardnacrusha Headrace and Tailrace Canals.

Passage through Sarsfield Lock should be booked on +353-87-7972998, on the day prior to travel and it should be noted also that transit is not possible two hours either side of low water.

A Hydrographic survey in 2020 of the navigation channel revealed that the approach from Shannon Bridge to Sarsfield Lock and the Dock area has silted up. Masters of vessels and water users are advised to navigate to the Lock from Shannon bridge on a rising tide one or two hours before High Tide.

Lower Bann Navigation

The attention of all users is drawn to the “Users Code for the Lower Bann”, in particular to that section covering “Flow in the River” outlining the dangers for users both on the banks and in the navigation, associated with high flow rates when the river is in spate. Canoeists should consult and carry a copy of the “Lower Bann Canoe Trail” guide issued by the Canoe Association of Northern Ireland. Users should also contact the DfI Rivers Coleraine, who is responsible for regulating the flow rates on the river, for advisory information on the flow rates to be expected on any given day.

DfI Rivers Coleraine. Tel: 0044 28 7034 2357 Email: [email protected]

Lower Bann Navigation – Newferry – No wake zone

A No Wake Zone exists on the Lower Bann Navigation at Newferry. Masters of vessels are requested to proceed at a slow speed and create no wake while passing the jetties and slipways at Newferry.

Overhead Power Lines (OHPL) and Air draft

All Masters must be aware of the dangers associated with overhead power lines, in particular sailing vessels and workboats with cranes or large air drafts. Voyage planning is a necessity in order to identify the location of overhead lines crossing the navigation.

Overhead power line heights on the River Shannon are maintained at 12.6metres (40 feet) from Normal Summer level for that section of navigation, masters of vessels with a large air draft should proceed with caution and make additional allowances when water levels are high.

If a vessel or its equipment comes into contact with an OHPL the operator should NOT attempt to move the vessel or equipment. The conductor may still be alive or re-energise automatically. Maintain a safe distance and prevent third parties from approaching due to risk of arcing. Contact the emergency services for assistance.

Anglers are also reminded that a minimum ground distance of 30 metres should be maintained from overhead power lines when using a rod and line.

Submarine Cables and Pipes

Masters of vessels are reminded not to anchor their vessels in the vicinity of submarine cables or pipes in case they foul their anchor or damage the cables or pipes. Look to the river banks for signage indicating their presence.

Water Levels - Precautions

Low Water Levels:

When water levels fall below normal summer levels masters should be aware of:

Navigation

To reduce the risk of grounding masters should navigate on or near the centreline of the channel, avoid short cutting in dog-legged channels and navigating too close to navigation markers.

Proceeding at a slow speed will also reduce “squat” effect i.e. where the vessel tends to sit lower in the water as a consequence of higher speed.

Slipways

Reduced slipway length available under the water surface and the possibility of launching trailers dropping off the end of the concrete apron.

More slipway surface susceptible to weed growth requiring care while engaged in launching boats, from slipping and sliding on the slope. Note also that launching vehicles may not be able to get sufficient traction on the slipway once the craft is launched to get up the incline.

Bank Erosion

Very dry riverbanks are more susceptible to erosion from vessel wash.

Lock Share

Maximising on the number of vessels in a lock will ensure that the total volume of water moving downstream is decreased. Lock cycles should be used for vessels travelling each way.

High Water Levels:

When water levels rise above normal summer level masters should be aware of:

Navigation

Navigation marks will have reduced height above the water level or may disappear underwater altogether making the navigable channel difficult to discern.

In narrow sections of the navigations water levels will tend to rise more quickly than in main streams and air draft at bridges will likewise be reduced.

There will also be increased flow rates particularly in the vicinity of navigation infrastructure such as bridges, weirs, locks etc where extra care in manoeuvring vessels will be required.

Harbours and Jetties

Due care is required in harbours and at slipways when levels are at or near the same level as the harbour walkways' as the edge will be difficult to discern especially in reduced light conditions. It is advised that Personal Flotation Devices be worn if tending to craft in a harbour in these conditions.

Slipways

Slipways should only be used for the purpose of launching and recovering of water craft or other objects from the water. Before using a slipway it should be examined to ensure that the surface has sufficient traction/grip for the intended purpose such as launching a craft from a trailer using a vehicle, that there is sufficient depth of water on the slipway to float the craft off the trailer before the concrete apron ends and that the wheels of the trailer do not drop off the edge of the slipway. That life-saving appliances are available in the vicinity, that the vehicle is roadworthy and capable of coping with the weight of the trailer and boat on the incline. It is recommended that slipway operations are conducted by two persons.

Caution to be Used in Reliance upon Aids to Navigation

The aids to navigation depicted on the navigation guides comprise a system of fixed and floating aids to navigation. Prudent mariners will not rely solely on any single aid to navigation, particularly a floating aid to navigation. With respect to buoys, the buoy symbol is used to indicate the approximate position of the buoy body and the ground tackle which secures it to the lake or river bed. The approximate position is used because of the practical limitations in positioning and maintaining buoys in precise geographical locations. These limitations include, but are not limited to, prevailing atmospheric and lake/river conditions, the slope of and the material making up the lake/river bed, the fact that the buoys are moored to varying lengths of chain, and the fact that the buoy body and/or ground tackle positions are not under continuous surveillance. Due to the forces of nature, the position of the buoy body can be expected to shift inside and outside the charted symbol.

Buoys and perches are also moved out of position or pulled over by those mariners who use them to moor up to instead of anchoring. To this end, mariners should always monitor their passage by relating buoy/perch positions with the published navigation guide. Furthermore, a vessel attempting to pass close by always risks collision with a yawing buoy or with the obstruction that the buoy or beacon/perch marks.

Masters of Vessels are requested to use the most up to date Navigation guides when navigating on the Inland Waterways.

Information taken from Special Marine Notice No 1 of 2023