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Displaying items by tag: Munster Port

#ScenicPort - Scenic Kinsale with its marina and fishing fleet based in the west Cork harbour is widely renowned for its culinary status, however what is probably less known is its commercial shipping activity, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Around 100 cargoships annually call to Port of Kinsale along with occasional transatlantic superyachts and the odd small cruiseship. Commercial ships take the relative anchorage of the outer harbour downriver from the port on the Bandon estuary that is almost landlocked. Chief imports are bulk animal-foods and exports are timber.

In recent days Afloat monitored one of the larger ships to call that been newbuild Arklow Cape launched in October. The 5,085dwt cargoship having been introduced in November was not on a maiden voyage though it was the newbuild's first port of call to the harbour. Since last night the new ship had departed bound for Foynes. 

Initially on arrival to Kinsale the 87m Arklow Cape, the second of 10 'C' class sisters on order from ASL had anchored in the outer harbour. This is located closer to the famous Old Head of Kinsale. On board was a cargo of malted barley that had been loaded in Poole, Dorset. The seven crew of the Irish flagged Dutch built ship had sailed from the UK port to Kinsale’s single commercial pier.

Three years ago the pier named Custom Quay was given a €1.1m upgrade by the port’s authority, Cork County Council. The investment in port infrastructure saw an improvement to the 60m pier which was extended by 25m.

On completion of the works, the first ship to use the upgraded 85m pier took place in March 2015 with the berthing of Swami, incidentally a former ASL fleetmate named Arklow Swan. The ship’s agent Bandon Co-op who are the licensed stevedores for the Port of Kinsale, were instrumental in facilitating this inaugural call using the newly extended quay. Swami had discharged 3,800 tonnes of fertiliser.

Other cargoes traded through the south Munster port where handling facilities cater for coal, cement, fertiliser and grain.

The lengthened Custom Quay is a considerable improvement compared to the original pier in which a visit was made to during the last decade.

On that occasion when covering the Port of Kinsale for Inshore-Ireland (August 2005) and Ships Monthly (November 2005) another cargoship, Conformity by coincidence had too made a maiden port of call to the harbour. She arrived from Boston, Lincolnshire with a cargo of wheat feed.

 

Published in Ports & Shipping

Whether you're a boat enthusiast, historian, archaeologist, fisherman, or just taken by the natural beauty of Ireland's waterways, you will find something of interest in our Inland pages on Afloat.ie.

Inland Waterways

Ireland is lucky to have a wealth of river systems and canals crossing the country that, while once vital for transporting goods, are today equally as important for angling, recreational boating and of course tourism.

From the Barrow Navigation to the Erne System, the Grand Canal, the Lower Bann, the Royal Canal, the Shannon-Erne Waterway and the Shannon Navigation, these inland waterways are popular year in, year out for anyone with an interest in rambling; flora and fauna; fishing; sailing; motorboating; canoeing, kayaking and waterskiing; and cruising on narrowboats.

Although most will surely identify Ireland's inland waterways with boating holidays and a peaceful afternoon's angling, many varieties of watersport are increasingly favoured activities. Powerboat and Jetski courses abound, as do opportunities for waterskiing or wakeboarding. For those who don't require engine power, there's canoeing and kayaking, as Ireland's waterways have much to offer both recreational paddlers and those looking for more of a challenge. And when it comes to more sedate activities, there's nothing like going for a walk along a canal or river bank following some of the long-distance Waymarked Ways or Slí na Sláinte paths that criss-cross the country.

Ireland's network of rivers, lakes and canals is maintained by Waterways Ireland, which is one of the six North/South Implementation Bodies established under the British-Irish Agreement in 1999. The body has responsibility for the management, maintenance, development and restoration of inland navigable waterways on the island of Ireland, principally for recreational purposes. It also maintains Ireland's loughs, lakes and channels which are sought after for sailing; the network of canal locks and tow paths; as well as any buoys, bridges and harbours along the routes.

Along the Grand and Royal Canals and sections of the Barrow Navigation and the Shannon-Erne Waterway, Waterways Ireland is also responsible for angling activities, and charges Inland Fisheries Ireland with carrying out fisheries development, weed management and ensuring water quality.

Brian Goggin's Inland Blog

Giving his personal perspective on Ireland's Inland Waterways from present-day activities to their rich heritage, Brian Goggin tells it like it is with his Inland Blog.

From recognising achievements in management of the waterways to his worries on the costs of getting afloat on Ireland's canals, Goggin always has something important to say.

He also maintains the website Irish Waterways History that serves as a repository for a wealth of historical accounts of the past commercial and social uses alike of Ireland's rivers and canals, which were once the lifeblood of many a rural community.