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In a third attempt to load two fast-ferries bound for Mauritius, one of the vessel's has so far been successfully positioned onboard the cargoship in Galway dock, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The Clann na nOileáin was first loaded onboard this morning whereas her sister Clann Eagle I will be hoisted this afterrnoon. It is expected that this procedure will take around four hours to complete.

The 234-passenger ferries have been the centre of attention since two previous attempts proved unsuccessful following incidents in the mid-west port.

On the first attempt that took place nearly a fortnight ago, three men onboard the ferry were injured when the ships's crane-sling snapped when handling the 170 tonnes ferry Clann na nOileáin.

Fortunately the ferry was hanging over the water and splashed into Dun Aengus Dock rather than landing on the hold of the 4,078 gross tonnes cargo-vessel Thor Gitta. In the second attempt last
Saturday one of the cargoship's cranes sounded a safety alarm which halted proceedings.

The Danish-flagged Thor Gitta is the second heavy-lift cargoship that has been called in to assist in transporting the two former Aran Islands fast-ferries. The 100m cargoship is owned by Thor Rederi A/S of Svendborg and is expected to depart Galway tommorrow morning.

The first heavylift vessel the German-flagged Patanal grounded in rough seas after dragging its anchor in Casla Bay at the entrance to Rossaveal, where the ferries were originally based in readiness for loading.

Patanal suffered hull damage and was taken into Galway Bay for preliminary repair work. Last week the 7,002grt vessel operated by Harren + Partners, departed the bay to undergo further repairs at a dry-dock in Bremerhaven.

Published in Ports & Shipping
The heavy lift cargoship Thor Gitta is due to make a second attempt to load two former Aran Islands fast ferries in Galway Docks tomorrow morning, writes Jehan Ashmore.
It is envisaged that the operation to hoist the sisters, Clann Eagle I and Clann na nOileáin which each weigh 170 tonnes will be completed by tomorrow evening. The Danish flagged heavy liftship is expected to remain in port until Friday so as to make further preparations in advance of the long delivery voyage to the ferries new owners in Mauritius in the Indian Ocean.

In the first attempt to load the ferries last week, the Clann na nOileáin fell into the Dun Aengus Dock when the sling rope broke causing the French built 234-passenger craft to fall some 12m /40ft. Onboard the ferry were three people who were taken to hospital but were later released.

Thor Gitta is fitted with two deck-mounted cranes and this feature is also similarly found on the Patanal, which grounded in Casla Bay at the entrance to Rossaveal, nearly a fortnight ago. The German owned 7,002grt was the first vessel chartered to bring the fast-ferries from Rossaveal, but the ferries were subsequently sailed to Galway after the ship was refloated.

The 120m Patanal has undergone "underwater and internal inspections and repairs," according to Capt. Brian Sheridan, harbourmaster of Galway Port Company though he added "that the vessel would remain subject to an inspection by the Marine Survey Office before she can be released".

According to a statement released by the Patanal's owners, Harren & Partner, the vessel is then to be taken to dry dock in Bremerhaven for further repairs.

Since the incident the vessel has been at anchorage off Black Point on the Co. Clare side of Galway Bay where she was monitored initially for pollution and the tug Celtic Isle in attendance. The tug is operated by Celtic Tugs and is normally based in Foynes, Co. Limerick.

Published in Ports & Shipping
A 7,837 tonnes heavy cargo-liftship Pantanal which was to collect two former Aran Island fast ferries, ran aground this morning in rough seas off Rossaveal, according to RTE.ie
The Danish-owned vessel got into difficulties around 06.00 when it ran aground in Casla Bay at the entrance to the Connemara harbour. The Pantanal which has a crew of 14 are trying to establish it the 2004 built vessel can be refloated later today.

Pantanel which is equipped with two deck-mounted cranes was due to lift the 170 tonnes fast ferry sisters Clann Eagle I and Clann na nOileáin. The pair which were owned by Bád Arann Teo (trading as Aran Direct) went into receivership and were sold last month to new owners in Mauritius in the Indian Ocean. For further details click  here.

The Antigua Barbuda registered vessel specialises in transporting heavy project cargo around the world. To see a photo of the vessel with boat-cargo onboard click here.

Published in Ports & Shipping
Two former Aran Islands fast-passenger ferries have been sold to a buyer in Mauritius, the island nation which lies southeast off the African continent in the Indian Ocean, and some 900km east of Madagascar, writes Jehan Ashmore.
The ferries Clann Eagle I (2005/169grt) and Clann na nOileáin (2006/172grt) were sold for a seven figure sum by the auctioneer, Dominic J. Daly.

The sale follows a previous attempt to dispose of the 234-passenger capacity ferries at an auction in Galway last month. Despite bids reaching €950,000, they were withdrawn at the auction which was also hosted by the Cork based auctioneer.

The vessels remain in Rossaveal but they will be transferred onto a cargoship as 'deck-cargo' to make the long delivery journey across the high seas for the new owners. Mauritius is neighboured by the smaller islands of Agalega, Cargados Carajos and Rodrigues which together form the Mascarene Islands, with the French island of Réunion some 200km to the southwest.

ARAN_FERRIES

Sisters Clann na nOileáin and Clann Eagle I moored at Rossaveal. Photo
Jehan Ashmore / ShipSNAPS

With a streamlined aluminium 26m mono-hull design the vessels are capable of 19.7 knots. When the craft were constructed in 2006 they were worth between €5 and €6m. The pair were built in France by the OCEA boatyard at Les Sables d'Olonne, on the Bay of Biscay coastline, for Bád Arann Teo (trading as Aran Direct).

The company which went into receivership, operated on routes between Rossaveal and the Aran Islands (Oileáin Árann) of Inishmore (Inis Mór) Inishmaan (Inis Meáin) and Inisheer (Inis Oírr).

In recent years, Aran Direct had intended to introduce a larger passenger-only catamaran ferry on a new route between Galway and Kilronan, the capital of Inishmore and the largest of the three islands.

The fast-craft catamaran envisaged for the route was the U.S. based, 37m Harbour Lynx (2003/427grt) formerly Angel of Freedom, with a capacity for 300 passengers.To be renamed Aran Princess, the vessel was scheduled to take only an hour's passage time across Galway Bay.

In addition the revived route would have been the first direct 'passenger' carrying link between Galway City to the Aran Islands, since the closure in 1988 by CIE (Córas Iompair Éireann) of the three-hour route operated by the Naomh Éanna (1957/438grt).

Published in Island News
Two passenger ferry vessels which operated on routes to the Aran Islands will be put up for auction next month, writes Jehan Ashmore.
The sister vessels are the MV Clann Eagle I (2005/169grt) and MV Clann Na N'oileain which was built a year later and is slightly larger at 172 gross registered tonnes. French-built, the fast-ferries are capable of 19.7 knots and have an aluminium monohull and a two-deck superstructure with accommodation for 243-passengers.

Aran Direct (which was the trading name for Bád Arann Teoranta) operated on routes between Rossaveal to Inis Mór, Inis Meáin and Inis Oírr. The company competed in an intensely competitive market with at least 10 other vessels combined from the fleets of Aran Doolin Ferries, Aran Island Ferries and the Doolin Ferry Company.

In September 2008, Aran Direct ceased operations and the vessels were laid-up at Rossaveal, where they remain, as seen (if not previously sold) prior to the public auction.

At the instructions of Liam Dowdall Esq., Receiver & Manager, Bád Arann Teoranta (in receivership), the vessels are to be sold in one or separate lots. The public auction is to be held at 12 noon on Thursday 24th February at the Harbour Hotel, The Docks, Galway.

An outline of the vessels details can be downloaded in PDF format by clicking HERE. For further details, photographs and conditions of sale contact Dominic J. Daly, Auctioneer, Cork Tel: (021) 4277399 or E-mail: [email protected] and logging on to www.dominicjdaly.com

For further technical details, you can contact Noel O'Regan of Promara Ltd on 087 3435666 or email [email protected]

Published in Island News
An Aran Islands ferry company is currently battling the Department of the Marine in the High Court over charges for the use of Rossaveal Harbour, the Galway Advertiser reports.
Island Ferries Teoranta claims that harbour fees have risen eight-fold since 2003, saying they are "unreasonable, discriminatory and unrelated to the cost of running the harbour".
The company, run by Paddy O'Brien and family, said it received a bill of more than €200,000 in mid-2005, compared to annual bills of around €23,000 in previous years, and claims that one of its vessels was wrongfully detained when it refused to pay.
Irish Ferries has also accused the Government of breaking EU competition law over its monopoly on the provision of harbour facilities.
The High Court hearings continue.

An Aran Islands ferry company is currently battling the Department of the Marine in the High Court over charges for the use of Rossaveal Harbour, the Galway Advertiser reports.

Island Ferries Teoranta claims that harbour fees have risen eight-fold since 2003, saying they are "unreasonable, discriminatory and unrelated to the cost of running the harbour".

The company, run by Paddy O'Brien and family, said it received a bill of more than €200,000 in mid-2005, compared to annual bills of around €23,000 in previous years, and claims that one of its vessels was wrongfully detained when it refused to pay.

Irish Ferries has also accused the Government of breaking EU competition law over its monopoly on the provision of harbour facilities.

The High Court hearings continue.

Published in Irish Harbours
Page 14 of 14

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