Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Doolin

#COASTAL NOTES - Clare surfers say they have no confidence that development plans for Doolin Pier will not have a negative impact on the Crab Island surf break.

The Irish Examiner reports on an oral hearing on the project held by An Bord Pleanála in Ennistymon on Wednesday morning at which representatives of the Irish Surfing Association and the West Cost Surf Club expressed their fears of losing "the jewel in the crown" of Irish surfing.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, local surfers have been at loggerheads with Clare County Council over long-delayed plans to redevelop the pier facilities at Doolin, which currently serves more than 70,000 passengers between the Clare coast and the Aran Islands.

At present the pier cannot be accessed at low tide, and foul weather cost the ferry route to 40 days's business last year, the meeting heard.

Island co-op Comhar Caomhán Inis Oírr is among the groups supporting the €8 million development plans, arguing that the islands would be "under threat" if the project does not proceed.

Published in Coastal Notes

#DOOLIN PIER - The Irish Times reports that surfers will be at loggerheads with Clare County Council this week over controversial plans to redevelop Doolin Pier.

The €8 million plans for the Clare coastal village have been delayed for some time, and have already cost the council more than €250,000.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the development was backed unanimously by Clare councillors in March 2011 after revisions made following concerns from local surfers about its impact on popular waves in the area.

However, the Irish Surfing Association (ISA) maintained that even that revised plan would result in the elimination of the waves at Doolin Point and Crab Island - the latter described as Ireland's answer to the Pipeline in Hawaii.

The proposed new pier would serve the 70,000 passengers that use the ferry service between Doolin and the Aran Islands. The development is also supported by the Doolin unit of the Irish Coast Guard, which hopes to get a new coastguard station as part of development plans for the area.

Published in Coastal Notes

#MARINE WILDLIFE - A hat-tip goes to WorldIrish for this video posted on Vimeo by Monty Cantson capturing the moment when a playful dolphin paid a visit to a group of divers in Bones Bay at Doolin, Co Clare recently.

According to Lahinch Surf Experience, the bottlenose dolphin goes by the name of Dusty, after the singer Dusty Springfield.

The female cetacean has been a fixture of the area for more than a decade, and while apparently less friendly than Dingle's famous Fungie - she doesn't like to be touched - she seems happy to swim beside swimmers and divers, and loves to play with anything you might have in the water with you!

Published in Marine Wildlife

#COASTGUARD - The Irish Coast Guard's Doolin unit conducted eight searches for missing people at the Cliffs of Moher in 2011, according to The Irish Times.

Doolin officer Mattie Shannon told the paper that six bodies were recovered by the coastguard unit of the cliffs, which are one of the most popular tourist destinations in the country - but have also become a blackspot for suicide attempts.

The Samaritans have put up signs in the area advertising their helpline, while staff at the cliffs' visitor centre have received training for suicide intervention.

A spokesperson for The Samaritans said that the installation of a special phone with a direct line to their anonymous counselling service may also be considered.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard
Surfers have hailed the recent ruling by An Bord Pleanála that Clare County Council must reapply for planning permission for its proposed €6 million redevelopment of Doolin Pier.
As previously reported on Afloat.ie, local surfers and the Irish Surfing Association (ISA) had expressed dismay over the current development plans – approved by the council earlier this year – which they maintain would result in the destruction of the "world renowned" waves at Doolin Point and Crab Island.
The Irish Times reports that the council must now resubmit its planning application and prepare and environmental impact statement (EIS) due to the potential impact on tidal and wave patterns in the area, setting back plans for at least a year.
The proposed scheme already has support from the local business community and the Doolin Coast Guard unit, which argues that congestion on the pier in peak tourist periods may interfere with rescue efforts.
A spokesperson for the West Coast Surf Club said that both it and the ISA were available "to meet with the council to progress a mutually agreeable design for the pier".
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Surfers have hailed the recent ruling by An Bord Pleanála that Clare County Council must reapply for planning permission for its proposed €6 million redevelopment of Doolin Pier.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, local surfers and the Irish Surfing Association (ISA) had expressed dismay over the current development plans – approved by the council earlier this year – which they maintain would result in the destruction of the "world renowned" waves at Doolin Point and Crab Island.

The Irish Times reports that the council must now resubmit its planning application and prepare and environmental impact statement (EIS) due to the potential impact on tidal and wave patterns in the area, setting back plans for at least a year.

The proposed scheme already has support from the local business community and the Doolin Coast Guard unit, which argues that congestion on the pier in peak tourist periods may interfere with rescue efforts.

A spokesperson for the West Coast Surf Club said that both it and the ISA were available "to meet with the council to progress a mutually agreeable design for the pier".

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing
The Irish Examiner reports that the Doolin coastguard unit is set to get a new coastguard station.
One of the busiest search and rescue units in the State, the Doolin unit of the Irish Coast Guard currently has to drag its boat some 2km by tractor to Doolin pier.
Much to the delight of local campaigners, the Office of Public Works is now inviting tenders for a €1.9 million dedicated coastguard facility at the pier, following the granting of planning permission by Clare County Council as part of a development plan for the area.
However, the unit's officer in charge Mattie Shannon is cautious about a start date for construction, as the Department of Transport will not be able to provide funding for the project until next year at the earliest.
Fianna Fáil TD for Clare Timmy Dooley told the Examiner: "The least the current Government can do is honour the commitment of the previous government and ensure that the appropriate finances are in place for next year."
The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

The Irish Examiner reports that the Doolin coastguard unit is finally set to get a new coastguard station.

One of the busiest search and rescue units in the State, the Doolin unit of the Irish Coast Guard currently has to drag its boat some 2km by tractor to Doolin pier.

Much to the delight of local campaigners, the Office of Public Works is now inviting tenders for a €1.9 million dedicated coastguard facility at the pier, following the granting of planning permission by Clare County Council as part of a development plan for the area.

However, the unit's officer in charge Mattie Shannon is cautious about a start date for construction, as the Department of Transport will not be able to provide funding for the project until next year at the earliest.

Fianna Fáil TD for Clare Timmy Dooley told the Examiner: "The least the current Government can do is honour the commitment of the previous government and ensure that the appropriate finances are in place for next year."

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard
The capsized Rolex Fastnet Race entrant Rambler 100 was not the only vessel that got into difficulties yesterday as an Aran Islands ferry became stranded off Doolin Pier, according to a report in today's Irish Times.
Rose of Aran, a passenger ferry operated by Aran Doolin Ferries stranded on rocks for three hours, just metres off Doolin Pier when making an approach at 11.30 am to collect passengers travelling to the islands. The ferry was between Crab Island and Doolin pier when it ran aground about 25m from the shore.

According to ferry operator Kevin O'Brien, there were no passengers on board at the time and the vessel got under way again when it was lifted from the rocks with the tide. Mr O'Brien added "this was a very minor incident and there was no damage to the ferry. Doolin is tidal so these things do happen. Even a few inches of water can make a difference".

The Irish Coast Guard was notified of the incident at midday, and its marine rescue co-ordination centre in Dublin requested that members of the local Coast Guard unit board the vessel to assess if there was a pollution risk.

Doolin Coast Guard personnel carried out an inspection and confirmed the ferry had not been damaged and there was no risk of pollution. At about 2.15pm the ferry got under way again with the tide. The company was able to operate services to and from the Aran Islands with its second vessel.

Published in Ferry
The Doolin Coast Guard Unit has urged Clare County Council to continue its €6 million development plan for Doolin Point.
The pier plan has faced opposition from surfers who argue that the development will ruin the popular waves in the area.
The Irish Examiner reports that in the latest submission to the council, the Doolin Coast Guard Unit supports the development, claiming the current pier is "regularly over-congested" in peak tourist periods.
"This, in turn, can make it very difficult for our members to launch our boats in an efficient manner where time is of the essence," states the unit's officer in charge Mattie Shannon.
A separate submission by Doolin Tourism and Doolin Community Harbour Co-op, backed by 150 signatures from locals, called on Clare County Council to go ahead with the plan.
They dismissed surfers' concerns, stating that "the proposed pier and breakwater will not create a back wash effect" on the surfing waves at Crab Island and other areas.
The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

The Doolin Coast Guard Unit has urged Clare County Council to continue its €6 million development plan for Doolin Point.

The pier plan has faced opposition from surfers who argue that the development will ruin the popular waves in the area. 

The Irish Examiner reports that in the latest submission to the council, the Doolin Coast Guard Unit supports the development, claiming the current pier is "regularly over-congested" in peak tourist periods.

"This, in turn, can make it very difficult for our members to launch our boats in an efficient manner where time is of the essence," states the unit's officer in charge Mattie Shannon.

A separate submission by Doolin Tourism and Doolin Community Harbour Co-op, backed by 150 signatures from locals, called on Clare County Council to go ahead with the plan.

They dismissed surfers' concerns, stating that "the proposed pier and breakwater will not create a back wash effect" on the surfing waves at Crab Island and other areas.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard
Irish surfers have won their first battle against the development of Doolin Point in Co Clare, site of one of the country's top wave spots.
A planned council vote on proposals for the €6 million Doolin Pier development was halted last week after concerns were raised by the surfing community both at home and abroad, Surfer Today reports.
The council intends to lodge a new planning application for a smaller development 25 metres further away from the shore that is intended to have less impact on surfing conditions. A public consultation on the proposed development has also been suggested.
"It is vital that we do not lose the €6 million in funding, but we also have to make sure that the integrity of the waves are protected," said Councilor Martin Conway.
Doolin Point is considered one of the top wave spots in Europe, with signifcant tourism potential for the Irish economy.

Irish surfers have won their first battle against the development of Doolin Point in Co Clare, site of one of the country's top wave spots.

A planned council vote on proposals for the €6 million Doolin Pier development was halted last week after concerns were raised by the surfing community both at home and abroad, Surfer Today reports.

The council intends to lodge a new planning application for a smaller development 25 metres further away from the shore that is intended to have less impact on surfing conditions. A public consultation on the proposed development has also been suggested.

"It is vital that we do not lose the €6 million in funding, but we also have to make sure that the integrity of the waves are protected," said Councilor Martin Conway.

Doolin Point is considered one of the top wave spots in Europe, with significant tourism potential for the Irish economy.

Published in Surfing
The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) reports that a newborn bottlenose dolphin calf was washed up in Doolin, Co Clare last week (photos here).
Measuring 1.2m in length and weighing 21kg, the IWDG said it was "by far the smallest bottlenose dolphin recorded stranded in Ireland".
"From the bent dorsal fin and curled tail flukes we can confidently say this dolphin was only just born and live-stranded," said IWDG co-ordinator Simon Berrow, who added that the group could only speculate as to what happened.
"Maybe it was separated from its mother on birth, maybe she was unable to help it to the surface to take its first breath, maybe the mother was alone and did not have the support of a maternal group to assist at birth."

The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) reports that a newborn bottlenose dolphin calf was washed up in Doolin, Co Clare last week (photos here).

Measuring 1.2m in length and weighing 21kg, the IWDG said it was "by far the smallest bottlenose dolphin recorded stranded in Ireland".

"From the bent dorsal fin and curled tail flukes we can confidently say this dolphin was only just born and live-stranded," said IWDG co-ordinator Simon Berrow, who added that the group could only speculate as to what happened. 

"Maybe it was separated from its mother on birth, maybe she was unable to help it to the surface to take its first breath, maybe the mother was alone and did not have the support of a maternal group to assist at birth."

Published in Marine Wildlife
Page 3 of 4

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating