Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Lusitania

#Lusitania - Commemorations for those who died in the sinking of the Lusitania 100 years ago began in Cork Harbour yesterday (Sunday 1 February), as The Irish Times reports.

Starting with the tolling of St Colman's Cathedral's 49 bells in the heart of Cobh – which took in many of the dead and injured after the Cunard liner was sunk by a torpedo from a German U-boat off Kinsale on 7 May 1915 – the evening also saw the firing of ceremonial flares over the harbour.

And Co Cork Mayor Alan Coleman was among those speaking at the event to remember what he described as "the greatest maritime tragedy off our coast".

Yesterday's event was the first in a series of commemorations to be held over the next four months at places connected with the Lusitania's final voyage.

Published in Cork Harbour

#sealinks – In the current debate which has surfaced about the future of Aer Lingus, it is good to hear the realisation in all quarters, from politicians to business, economic and media commentators that Ireland is an 'island nation'. While the importance of air links is being highlighted, those same people could extend their thinking to the maritime links which keep this country alive in a way in which no air linkage can do.

This is emphasised in the leading story in the current edition of my radio programme, THIS ISLAND NATION which you can hear on this website, where I interview the first lady to become President of the Irish Institute of Master Mariners, the professional body for Shipmasters. Sea-going has been a male-dominated profession but Capt. Sinead Reen who lives in Crosshaven, Co.Cork, has done a lot to break that mould. She was also the first woman to qualify as a Deck Officer in Ireland and has served at sea on several types of vessels, including super tankers and cruise ships.

She describes in the interview how she chose a career at sea and, at a time when the Naval Service would not admit women, joined the Merchant Navy: "We are not seen by the general public because we are at sea, carrying the goods, the supplies, the imports, the exports, which this nation needs across the world's seaways. Without ships and seafarers this nation would find it difficult to exist." She discusses life at sea for a woman in a male environment aboardship and speaks of the great opportunities for employment at sea for both women and men. Her election underlines the opportunities of a career at sea for women in what has been a male-dominated profession.

It is an interview worth listening to, as is that about the commemorations planned in the Cork Harbour town of Cobh for the centenary of the sinking of the Lusitania in May.

Hendrik Verway, Chairman of Cobh Tourism, outlines the details of the commemorative plans. Cobh, where survivors of the Lusitania sinking by a German U-boat on May 7, 1915, were landed as well as the bodies of those who were killed in the tragedy, is planning ceremonies on the seafront at Cobh and a sail past by boats on the evening of May 7, with the vessels displaying a single white light to remember those who were killed. Two cruise ships will be in Cobh on the day. One of them, the Cunard's Queen Victoria, will be on a commemorative voyage and on Thursday afternoon, May 7, will sound her ship's whistle at the time at which the torpedo hit the Lusitania, to start a ceremony on the Cobh seafront . A quayside ceremony will start as the whistle sounds and which will conclude at 2.30 p.m., marking the time when the Lusitania sank beneath the waves. 1,198 passengers and crew died. Survivors were landed at Cobh, to where bodies of the dead were also brought and 169 buried. There were 764 survivors. Only 289 bodies were recovered. 169 are buried in the Old Cemetery in Cobh, 149 in three mass graves and 20 in individual plots. Amongst the commemorative events will be a series of lectures and an exhibition of photographs taken in Cobh, then called Queenstown, in the aftermath of the landing there of survivors and bodies by rescue vessels. Many of these photos have not been on public display before and have been digitised for exhibition from original glass plates photographed at the time, through the co-operation of the National Museum. It is also planned to re-enact the funeral of victims to the Old Cemetery in Cobh.

And in another interview on the programme, Paul Bourke of Inland Fisheries Ireland tells me that, for anglers, it has been a good year for the catching of specimen fish.

Fair Sailing...

Published in Island Nation

#portofcork – The Port of Cork has launched their Schools Initiative for 2015 and is encouraging all 5th class primary school teachers to get their class involved. This year's theme 'RMS Lusitania – Commemorating 100 Years in 2015' focuses on the sinking of the Lusitania which is an important event in the history of Cork Harbour.

The Port of Cork Schools Initiative aims to educate 5th class primary school children about the rich history associated with Cork Harbour and to highlight the importance of having a local port to facilitate the imports and exports of trade. The initiative also gives children a better understanding of where cargo comes from and how Ireland, as an island depends on Ports for trading.

All participating 5th classes who take part in the Port of Cork Schools Initiative will be treated to a boat trip around Cork harbour, compliments of the Port of Cork and each class will also receive a certificate of participation. The 'Best Overall Project' will receive a tour on board one of the many large cruise liners visiting Cork during the summer of 2015. In addition to this, an award will also be given for 'Best Artwork Piece'.

Speaking about the 2015 theme, Port of Cork Chief Executive Brendan Keating said: "We are delighted to be launching our tenth Schools Initiative which has gone from strength to strength each year. The theme this year will hopefully encourage school children to study the Port of Cork and the rich history of Cork Harbour. The centenary of the Lusitania this year is an important occasion which will be marked with a commemorative event in Cobh on the 7th May."

He continued; "Every year we have up to thirty schools participating and we hope this year we will have the same or more. This is an educational initiative open to primary schools in the Cork City and Harbour area."

Projects are to be presented in artwork format using painting and models. All submitted projects will go on public display in the Cobh Maritime Building before the winner is announced in May 2015. Closing date for entries is Friday 27th March 2015.

For more information on this year's schools initiative or to arrange a visit by the Port of Cork to your school, please contact Sinead Keary, Commercial Department, Port of Cork. Email [email protected] or call 021 4625375.

Published in Port of Cork

#Lusitania - A special memorial cruise celebrating the Lusitania on the centenary of its sinking will visit Cobh next summer, as the Irish Examiner reports.

May 7 is the date to mark in your calendars to see the Cunard cruise liner Queen Victoria dock at expanded facilities in the Cork Harbour town amid a host of events to mark the anniversary.

The 'Lusitania Remembered' cruise, which sets out from Southampton on 3 May next, will also host an exhibition of memorabilia from the ill-fated liner, torpedoed by a German U-boat in 1915.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Cruise Liners

#Diving - Writing in today's Irish Times, veteran diver Patrick O'Sullivan gives an introduction to his new book on the sinking of the Lusitania – and the deep-sea diving pioneer who helped rediscover the story of a vessel thought lost forever.

It was US Navy diver John Light who arrived in Kinsale in 1960 on a mission to lead the first sub-aqua team to reach the wreck of the ill-fated ocean liner some 45 years after her sinking by a German U-boat.

Over two years, Light and his team logged 42 dives to film the wreck site for American TV using standard compressed air, a highly risky proposition even for experienced commercial divers, many of whom bore the serious physical brunt of their adventures.

Later that decade, the race for new sources of fossil fuels led to a revolution in diving technology, prompting Light to return to the Lusitania wreck – which he had by then purchased – and finally uncover its mysteries, such as whether it was indeed a secret gunrunning vessel for the Allies in the First World War.

But as O'Sullivan writes, while this return effort turned out to be as ill-fated as the Lusitania herself, it did send Light on a new course diving into the history books instead of the deep waters off Cork.

The Irish Times has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Diving
Tagged under

#Lusitania - A nuclear weapons lab has found itself in trouble with US authorities over its work on a TV documentary on the sinking of the RMS Lusitania.

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory conducted munitions testing at its facility for National Geographic's Dark Secrets of the Lusitania, an investigation into how the passenger liner was torpedoed and sunk off the coast of Cork in May 1915.

But as the Los Angeles Times reports, the testing was a possible violation of strict rules governing the lab's government funding, insofar as doing work for National Geographic that could have been contracted to the private sector.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the documentary's findings have been disputed by the Lusitania's millionaire owner Gregg Bemis, who is hopeful of funding one more return expedition to the wreck site off the Old Head of Kinsale.

The LA Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastal Notes
Tagged under

#CorkHarbour – As previously reported the Cork Harbour Open Weekend which began today is packed with lots of free activities for all the family to see and enjoy throughout the natural harbour, writes Jehan Ashmore.

As previously reported, due to operational reasons, unfortunately the Naval Service are unable to provide the L.E. Orla (P41) for public tours at City Quay as part of this weekend's Cork Harbour Open Weekend. 

Should you however be taking an excursion to Cobh today, notably two flagships, one belonging to a French ferry firm, the other a German cruise company will be in local waters.

The impressive flagship Pont-Aven (2003/44,000grt) of Brittany Ferries is a cruise ferry that is scheduled to pass off Cobh from 16.00hrs onwards. The Breton based ferry company celebrates 35 years of service running between Cork Harbour to Roscoff.

Approximately two hours later at 18.00hrs the other flagship, the Amadea (1991/29,008grt) of German cruise operator Pheonix Reisen is set to depart Cobh's deepwater quay. As previously reported she sailed last night from Foynes as part of a cruise to include Irish ports.

Prior to these ship movements there will be an air/sea rescue demonstration early this afternoon at 14.30hrs and held in the lower harbour carried out by the Irish Coastguard. This is a super spectacle for everyone to watch from the shoreline and see the incredible work carried out by our Coastguard.

At the Cobh Heritage Centre the Cork Dockyard Photographic Exhibition continues with a display of around 200 photographs which is a must for those interested in the history of local shipbuilding. The exhibition which is admission free is open today and closes tomorrow.

On Sunday at 14.00hrs there will be an event for anyone with an interest in the Lusitania tragedy. Local historian Jack Gilmartin will attend the Lusitania graves in the Old Church Cemetery in Cobh and outline the town's links with the tragedy of the sinking of the Lusitania in 1915.

For further information on the Port of Cork Open Weekend visit the programme www.corkharbour.ie or to download a PDF version of events click HERE.

 

Published in Cork Harbour

#Lusitania - The owner of the Lusitania may get his wish for a return dive to the wreck of the ill-fated passenger liner after the Minister for Heritage endorsed plans for a fresh investigation into its sinking.

The Irish Times reports that Minister Jimmy Deenihan has "agreed to a broad set of exploration objectives" with Gregg Bemis, the American millionaire businessman who has had had a financial interest in the wreck since 1968, and sole ownership since 1982.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Bemis had been seeking permission from the Government since last September after disputing the findings of a documentary made during an expedition to the wreck in the summer of 2011.

The cruise liner - a rival of the Titanic in its day - was hit by a torpedo from a German U-boat off the Old Head of Kinsale on 7 May 1915, during the First World War, sinking in just 20 minutes and taking 1,198 lives.

However, there have long been accounts of a second explosion on the sinking vessel before it was submerged - leading some to believe that it was carrying Allied munitions in its cargo.

Bemis staged his previous expedition in a bid to discover once and for all what really happened to the Lusitania. But last year he said that the National Geographic documentary team behind 'Dark Secrets of the Lusitania' used "insufficient data" to conclude that the second explosion was from a boiler in the bowels of the ship.

The businessman's ambitions had also been thwarted by a long-running dispute with Leinster House over the State's heritage rights to the wreck site and the effect of exploration on its condition.

Minister Deenihan is reviewing a new licence application that would involve numerous dives to the wreck over the next three years, including the centenary year of the Lusitania's demise in 2015.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastal Notes

#LUSITANIA - The millionaire owner of the Lusitania shipwreck has rejected the findings of the recent TV documentary investigating the mystery of its sinking.

The Irish Independent reports that Gregg Bemis is seeking permission from the Government to mount another dive to the wreck site to "pursue the truth".

On 7 May 1915 the cruise liner RMS Lusitania was hit by a torpedo from a German U-boat off the coast of the Old Head of Kinsale in Co Cork, with the loss of 1,198 lives.

A second explosion was reported minutes later, and within 20 minutes the vessel was underwater. Only 761 people survived.

Last summer Bemis launched what was expected to be the last dive expedition to find out what really happened to the former Cunard passenger liner.

However, Bemis argues that the National Geographic documentary team behind 'Dark Secrets of the Lusitania' used "insufficient data" when they concluded that the second explosion on the vessel following a torpedo strike was from a boiler blowing up in the bowels of the ship.

He remains convinced that a secret cargo of Allied munitions was responsible for the devastating explosion that sealed the ship's fate.

"They did not have all the information they should have had," said Bemis. "They used a computer analysis to get their theory and a computer is only as good as the garbage you put in. You put garbage in, you get garbage out."

The American said only a second dive with complete access to the hull could uncover what he believes really happened - a project he hopes will take place before the Lusitania centenery.

Published in Maritime TV

#LUSITANIA - M3 TV Productions will be holding a special event in the Port of Cork on 14 September to mark the worldwide release of Dark Secrets of the Lusitania.

The TV documentary, which premiered last month on the National Geographic Channel, follows what might have been the last expedition to the wreck of the ill-fated cruise liner.

On 7 May 1915 the passenger liner RMS Lusitania was sunk by a torpedo from a German U-boat off the coast of Cork, with the loss of 1,198 lives. But theories abound that there was more to the disaster than the torpedo strike, and that the ship's cargo hold contained precious art and illegal munitions.

The documentary attempts to uncover what really happened, using the latest submersible technology to see further into the shipwreck than ever before.

Gregg Bemis, the US owner of the shipwreck of the former Cunard cruise liner, will be flying in for the worldwide launch event.

Other guests include representatives from the marine industry, Minister for Arts & Heritage Jimmy Deenihan, Sean Kelly MEP, Senator Deirdre Clune and representatives from the Irish Coast Guard and Naval Service.

Actors will be dressed in First World War period costume to create a special atmosphere on the evening. The Irish Examiner will also display a digital exhibition of photos on the Lusitania, while UCC's Professor Dermot Keogh will give anoverview of that tumultuous period of world history.

Published in Maritime TV
Page 3 of 4

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating