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Displaying items by tag: port of Cork

Cork Port Company has formally opened its €89m deepwater container terminal at Ringaskiddy with an announcement that it is formulating a development plan for the harbour up to 2050.

The new terminal is described as "the largest single investment in marine infrastructure of any Irish port over the last 100 years." It has been operational since April, providing multimodal berths in the world, 13-metres in depth and 360 metres in length.

The Port Company says: "When fully operational, on completion of the M28 road network" it will have the capacity to handle 330,000 TEUs. . This road is the subject of protests and concerns from local residents but has Government approval.

At today's official launch Minister Hildegarde Naughton with special responsibility for transport and logistics, said that "Maritime transport accounts for more than 90% of Ireland's international trade, and the Port of Cork has played an integral role in keeping Ireland connected, as part of the global transport system."Cork and Dublin are the only ports in Ireland capable of servicing all six shipping modes – lift-on/lift-off, roll-on/roll-off, liquid bulk, dry bulk, break bulk and cruise.' 

Cork Port Company Chairperson, Michael Walsh, said the container port is only the first phase of an overall proposed development plan for the Port of Cork:

"This is the beginning of an exciting new chapter at Port of Cork as we seek to meet the next phase of needs of our community and customers. As we look forward towards a Vision for 2050, we see huge potential for our harbour to continue its role as a focal point for our community to live in and enjoy, as well as a key gateway for global.

"We would like everyone’s help in developing a new Masterplan to 2050, which will act as a blueprint for the future growth and development of the Port of Cork. I encourage our local community, customers and national stakeholders to share their ideas when we launch a consultation on our draft plan in the coming weeks.” 

The Ringaskiddy development went ahead only after intense local opposition. 

Details of a "blueprint for the growth to 2050" are to be delivered "in the months ahead, following public consultation," according to the Port Company.

Eoin McGettigan, Port CEO, PoCC, said: “It is really important to us that we work with our colleagues, neighbours and customers in the local area to make sure that the development of the Port of Cork is something that everyone is proud of."

Published in Port of Cork
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A memorandum of understanding has been signed today between Ireland’s first green hydrogen company, EIH2, the Port of Cork and the Port of Amsterdam.

This partnership will enable Ireland to maximise its use of offshore wind as a source of energy, by providing an alternative route to market for such renewable electricity. Earlier this year, the Irish Government identified an additional 2GW of offshore wind to be used for green hydrogen production, and this partnership provides the route to market that is needed for Ireland to become a net exporter of energy over time.

This partnership will help to enable the establishment of a supply chain for green hydrogen between Ireland and Europe via the port of Amsterdam.

This partnership agreement reflects the high level of collaboration between Ireland and The Netherlands and the European approach of working together to become the first Net Zero continent. The event forms part of a major offshore wind mission organised by the Netherlands Embassy in Ireland from 11th to 14th September and held in Cork. The purpose of the mission is to increase collaboration on the energy transition between Ireland and The Netherlands at a national level and business to business.

The event will bring together key stakeholders from the wind sector in Ireland and The Netherlands including supply chain, developers, academics, utilities, policy writers and policy influencers.

The signing ceremony of the Memorandum of Understanding was attended by the Dutch Minister for Climate and Energy Policy, Mr. Rob Jetten, and the Irish Minister of State for Public Procurement, eGovernment and Circular Economy, Mr. Ossian Smyth, as official witnesses to the agreement. Also represented were Lord Mayor Cork City, Cllr Deirdre Forde and Deputy Lord Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr Anthony Barry.

Pearse Flynn, EIH2’s founder said: “Our goal at EIH2 is to help both Ireland and Europe achieve their ambitious energy targets. The recent RePowerEU plan quadruples the role for Green Hydrogen in Europe. This was reflected in Ireland’s recent carbon budgets, with an additional 2GW of offshore wind planned specifically for green hydrogen production. This partnership is the beginning of a supply chain for green hydrogen from Ireland where there is a lot of wind but not a lot of hydrogen demand to Europe where the situation is reversed.”

Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer of the Port of Cork Company said: “At the Port of Cork Company, we see significant opportunities for Cork Harbour to become a hub for renewable energy, which will benefit the environment, local businesses and create employment in the region. We hope to utilise our facilities at this strategic location, working together with like-minded partners to support the development of renewable energy opportunities.”

Ireland and the Netherlands have traditionally enjoyed strong and historic trade relations and both countries have placed strategic priority on the development of production capacity and international distribution of green hydrogen.

Gert-Jan Nieuwenhuizen, Director Business Development Cargo of Port of Amsterdam said: “Port of Amsterdam is very pleased with the signing of this MoU with such valuable partners. It underlines both the strong ties between Ireland and our port and the increasing importance of green hydrogen. For Port of Amsterdam, priorities are to make green hydrogen available to the large industrial clusters in the greater Amsterdam area, as well as to serve as a gateway to the European hinterland, including regions with high potential demand in Germany. The developments in the south of Ireland and the technical proficiency of Irish parties, mean the country will be well positioned for the future export of this new energy source. The port of Amsterdam will offer a route to market for Irish green hydrogen, both in our port itself, and in the rest of Europe.”

Published in Port of Cork
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Crowds lined the Riverside from Monkstown to Cobh in Cork Harbour this afternoon as the Big Lift Baffin left Cork Dockyard with three heavy lift cranes aboard bound for New York.

Two Cork Port tugs assisted the ship leaving the Dockyard. It went astern out to the centre of Monkstown Bay and was then turned bow on to leave the harbour down past Cobh, Whitegate and Roche"s Point for the ten-day voyage to the US.

Big Lift heading for sea and New YorkBig Lift heading for sea and New York

For more read Afloat's earlier report on the Big Lift Baffin here

Crowds watching Big Lift Baffin depart Cork DockyardCrowds watching Big Lift Baffin depart Cork Dockyard

Bob Bateman's Big Lift Photo Gallery Below

Published in Port of Cork

The largest single objects ever engineered in Ireland, to be shipped out of the country, have been loaded aboard The Big Lift Baffin at Cork Dockyard in Cork Harbour.

These are three ship-to-shore container cranes built by the Liebherr factory in Killarney, destined for the Maher Terminals at the Port of New York and New Jersey, on the east coast of the United States. These are amongst the world's largest shipping terminals.

The three cranes were designed and manufactured in Liebherr's facility in Killarney, which specialises in cranes for shipping terminals and port operations. The various parts of the crane were manufactured in Killarney and shipped to Cork, either by road, or by sea from Fenit Harbour. They were then assembled in DSG's 44-acre Cork Dockyard terminal, the former Verolme Cork Dockyard. 

Cork's Doyle Shipping Group (DSG) is handling transport operations, including commissioning the Big Lift Baffin, On arrival in the US, the ship will anchor off Sandy Hook, where preparations for passing under Bayonne Bridge, which connects New York to New Jersey will be made.

The Big Lift Baffin will take ten days for the voyage to the US.

"These cranes are the largest single objects ever engineered in Ireland to be shipped out of the country. Months of planning have gone into the process with extensive coordination between DSG, Liebherr and the Port of Cork. It highlights the capability and suitability of Cork Harbour for such operations. There is no air draft, so there are no wires or bridges to impede transport. Once they leave the terminal here, there is direct access to the open Atlantic," said Eoin O'Sullivan, director with DSG.

Published in Port of Cork
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19th August 2022

Cork Port Marks 250 Years

The 250-year history of Cork Port underscores the importance of the maritime sphere of the maritime sphere's importance to the region, its Chief Executive told a National Heritage Week event in the Crawford Art Gallery in the city, which was the site of the original Custom House on Leeside.

The Port gifted its collection of maritime paintings and artefacts, worth an estimated €1m.to the Gallery last year after it sold its city centre offices and moved to Ringaskiddy deepwater centre in the lower harbour.

The collection, on exhibition until August 28, comprises 17 paintings dating back to the 1800s by several renowned artists, such as Cobh-born marine painter George Mounsey Wheatley Atkinson. The collection includes a Ship's Register from Cork Harbour Commissioners dating back to 1912, referencing both the Titanic and Lusitania, an illuminated address to Charles Stewart Parnell (1846-1891), and a silver Admiralty Oar from 1686.

A painting by George Mounsey Wheatley Atkinson of a Barque Glenlara off Cork Harbour c.1865 from the Crawford Art Gallery Cork Collection A painting by George Mounsey Wheatley Atkinson of a Barque Glenlara off Cork Harbour c.1865 from the Crawford Art Gallery Cork Collection

"As a company, we are very proud of our heritage, which spans over 250 years. These unique maritime artworks by renowned artists, offer a fascinating insight into the operations of Cork Harbour at that time and underscore the Port's long-standing international significance for commerce and trade, "said Port Chief Executive Eoin McGettigan. "Not only does the collection signify the history of our great Port and harbour, but it also showcases how far the Port has come regarding leisure, operations, scale and trade. We are delighted this collection has found such a welcoming home at The Crawford Art Gallery."

The original gallery building, dating from 1714, was Cork's Custom House.

"This special collection of unique maritime artworks has been one of our most popular exhibitions," said the Director of the Crawford Art Gallery, Mary McCarthy.

"It acts as a visual reminder of this building's connection with Cork's Maritime past as well as showcasing the strong heritage of this great port, city and county."

Published in Port of Cork
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Two local giants, Mahain and Binne, from old Irish folklore are the names of the cranes at Cork Port’s Ringaskiddy container terminal, chosen by Crosshaven Boys’ National School.

The two names were voted most popular, as part of a recent local schools competition ‘Name the Cranes’, by the Port of Cork Company. The names represent the two 50 metre cranes at the Cork Container Terminal (CCT), in Ringaskiddy.

Port of Cork Company launched the ‘Name the Cranes’ competition in March, for the two 50-metre cranes at the Cork Container Terminal.

The the two new 50 metre cranes under construction at the Cork Container Terminal (CCT) in RingaskiddyThe the two new 50 metre cranes under construction at the Cork Container Terminal (CCT) in Ringaskiddy Photo: Bob Bateman

Local primary school pupils in the harbour area were asked to name the cranes. 800 students in 12 local harbour community schools took part. The top three names were chosen by pupils were put to a public vote on Facebook to choose the winning names.

Mahain and Binne were significant winners, leading with over half of 1,000 votes cast.

The names chosen by Crosshaven Boys’ National School are based on a local story from 1892, told by Robert Day. A giant called ‘Mahain’ is said to have thrown two stones from Monkstown - one landing in Ringaskiddy and the other in Crosshaven. Another giant called ‘Binne’, lived across the water in Currabinny and cast a stone into Crosshaven village where it came to rest on the foreshore near Crosshaven House.

The winning class of Crosshaven Boys’ N.S. will receive a very special guided boat trip around Cork Harbour, €1,000 worth of sport or art supplies and will be invited to cut the ribbon at the Official Opening of CCT, later this year. Runner-up schools, Star of the Sea Passage West, who put forward the names ‘Ardú and Ísliu’ and Ringaskiddy National School who suggested ‘Rocky and Spike’, also received €1,000 worth of art supplies for their school.

The names Mahain and Binne will be printed on each crane in the coming weeks. 

Speaking on the new names, Business Development Support Manager, David Browne said, “It is important to us to involve the local community and the up and coming generation in this new era for the Cork harbour community and wider region. Connecting local folklore with the cranes creates a lovely story, and the two 50 metre giants, Mahain and Binne, couldn't be more fitting names.”

The cranes are a landmark feature of the new CCT, which has been developed following an €86 million investment and recently became operational.

Published in Port of Cork
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As the Irish Examiner reports, Cork City Council is set to spend millions buying the Port of Cork’s city-centre quays to help facilitate one of the largest docklands regeneration schemes in Europe. 

The local authority and the commercial semi-State company have reached an “agreement in principle” that will see the council acquiring around 1.5km of quayside along the city's north and south docks following the relocation of the port company’s city centre operations to its expanded facilities downstream at Ringaskiddy.

Neither side has commented on the purchase price but it is understood that the figure will run to several million euro — significantly below the estimated €26m that was offered by the city at the height of the property boom when the port was planning its relocation downstream.

The agreement, which it is understood was signed off last Friday, now paves the way for detailed negotiations between both sides on the heads of the agreement. 

Both parties have agreed to establish working groups to hammer out the detail.

Much more from the newspaper here. 

In addition below is a Statement from Conor Mowlds, Chief Commercial Officer, Port of Cork Company which was issued yesterday (Wednesday 25th May 2022)

Contrary to reports in the media today, the Port of Cork Company (PoCC) has not signed a contract with Cork City Council to acquire the Port of Cork City Quays.

As per our media statement yesterday, we have agreed to enter into talks with Cork City Council to develop a Heads of Agreement, to eventually relocate port activity downriver from the City Quays. A key point of this agreement will be to ensure that PoCC continues to facilitate trade within the City Quays, and we wish to reassure our clients, our staff and stakeholders that there will be no handover of the quays until proper infrastructure, including the construction of the M28, is in place.

The Port of Cork Company maintains its support for the Cork Docklands redevelopment potential. It remains an objective that all Port City Centre business will relocate downriver towards Tivoli, Marino Point and Ringaskiddy, however this future development will only take place with consultation with all relevant stakeholders.

Published in News Update

The €86 million new container terminal at Ringaskiddy is to be brought into operation tomorrow by the Port of Cork company.

Conor Mowlds, the Port’s Chief Commercial Officer says this will be “a monumental milestone, the largest investment in our 250-year history. It’s a pivotal project in our strategic efforts to enhance and future proof our offering which will position Cork as an international gateway for trade.”

The weekly Maersk’s Costarican service will be the first to use the new facility in the lower harbour area, according to the Port Company.

Published in Port of Cork
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Brittany Ferries is doubling its service from Cork to France.

In addition to the regular Saturday sailing to Roscoff there will be an additional midweek service overnight on Wednesdays as part of a three-year deal signed today between the French ferry operator and the Port of Cork company.

Cork Port CEO Eoin McGettigan said the deal marks a 45-year connection and, after a challenging two-year pandemic, is a welcome return to tourism and ferry travel.

Tourism Ireland CEO Niall Gibbons predicted a €4m. boost to local tourism and stressed the importance of ferry services to an island nation. Absolutely critical for Ireland, he said. In 2019, the last major tourism year before the pandemic there had been 557,000 visitors from France to Ireland.

Brittany Ferries President, Jean-Marc Roué, said tourist traffic was 55 to 45 per cent in favour of French holidaying in Ireland. Early bookings are up over 35 per cent on 2019, the last year of ‘normal’ operations due to Covid.

The new deal was announced aboard the MV Arorique at Ringaskiddy. It will sail the midweek service, with the Pont Aven, the company’s flagship again operating on Saturdays.

Sailings will operate from this month until October.

Published in Ferry

Rotterdam based Value Maritime has secured a contract from shipping operator BG Freight Line (see previous story) to install its Filtree and carbon capture system on two feeder vessels, BG Onyx and BG Ruby.

Chartered from German shipowner HS Schiffahrt, these ships are scheduled to be retrofitted in the summer.

Upon completion of the upgrades, the ships will continue to sail in North-West Europe (where BG Freight's 'feeder' links call to UK and Ireland via Dublin Port and the Port of Cork)

They will emit less carbon and use Value Maritime outlets across the region to reuse carbon on land.

Value Maritime’s Filtree includes a Clean-Loop system and Carbon Capture feature.

Ship Technology has more on the contract to the container company which is a subsidiary of Peel Ports Group, the UK's second largest ports operator.

Published in Ports & Shipping
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