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Displaying items by tag: Blessing of the Boats

Ger O’Neill’s Proud Mary was named “best-dressed boat” at the annual blessing of vessels in Galway Bay last weekend.

Kevin O’Brien’s Blue Shark took second place in the same event, which was marked by showers of rain.

Gleoitegs, púcáns and hookers form part of the Claddagh’s rich history, and the event was hosted the Cladonian Mariners’ Boat Club and local vessel owners.

Joe Shoer, owner of the Teegan, in the wheelhouse during the Blessing of Galway Bay from on boardJoe Shoer, owner of the Teegan, in the wheelhouse during the Blessing of Galway Bay from on board Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

The weather conditions prompted people on board the vessel Teegan, owned by Joe Shoer, to burst into their rendition of ‘Singin’ in the Rain’, made famous by Gene Kelly.

Fr Matthew Farrell OP, PP, St Mary’s, Claddagh, recites a decade of the rosary on board the Teegan as boats sail for the Blessing of Galway Bay last Sunday. Sailing alongside is the Blue Shark with owner Kevin O’Brien at the helm. The Blue Shark won second prize for the “Best Dressed Boat” at the event.Fr Matthew Farrell OP, PP, St Mary’s, Claddagh, recites a decade of the rosary on board the Teegan as boats sail for the Blessing of Galway Bay last Sunday. Sailing alongside is the Blue Shark with owner Kevin O’Brien at the helm. The Blue Shark won second prize for the “Best Dressed Boat” at the event Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

King of the Claddagh Michael Lynskey and his son Pat dropped down to meet people on vessels when they returned to the Claddagh.

The ceremony was presided over by Fr Matthew Farrell of St Mary’s, Claddagh.

A decade of the rosary is recited before the Blessing of the BayA decade of the rosary is recited before the Blessing of the Bay Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

Fr Farrell blessed the boats, the nets on board fishing vessels and the people crewing them. He recited a decade of the rosary on board the Teegan and sprinkled holy water in the direction of the fleet.

Fr Matthew Farrell OP, PP, St Mary’s, Claddagh, sprinkles holy water during the Blessing of Galway Bay.Fr Matthew Farrell OP, PP, St Mary’s, Claddagh, sprinkles holy water during the Blessing of Galway Bay Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

People on board the Teegan burst into song with ‘Singing in The Rain’ during a shower as the boat is moored at the Claddagh after the Blessing of Galway BayPeople on board the Teegan burst into song with ‘Singing in The Rain’ during a shower as the boat is moored at the Claddagh after the Blessing of Galway Bay Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

Deputy Mayor of Galway Cllr Mike Cubbard (Ind) travelled on board the Naomh Crónán with Peter Connolly of Bádóirí an Chladaigh at the helm.

Deputy Mayor of Galway, Cllr Mike Cubbard, on board the Naomh Crónán with Peter Connolly of Bádóirí an Chladaigh at the helm during the Blessing of Galway BayDeputy Mayor of Galway, Cllr Mike Cubbard, on board the Naomh Crónán with Peter Connolly of Bádóirí an Chladaigh at the helm during the Blessing of Galway Bay Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

Also there to mark the ritual was Cllr Niall MacNelis (Lab), along with Galway businessman and sailor Enda O Coineen.

Galway businessman and sailor Enda O’Coineen at the Blessing of Galway BayGalway businessman and sailor Enda O’Coineen at the Blessing of Galway Bay Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

After the blessing, Teresa Shoer sang 'Here’s a Toast to You Claddagh', and there was music, while fun was had by all.

Teresa Shoer sings 'Here’s a Toast to You Claddagh' after the Blessing of Galway BayTeresa Shoer sings 'Here’s a Toast to You Claddagh' after the Blessing of Galway Bay Photo: Joe O'Shaughnessy

Published in Galway Harbour
Tagged under

Dublin Port Company has hailed the recent Blessing of the Boats ceremony and flotilla from Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club, which was officiated by Fr Ivan Tonge.

The annual blessing of the boats and fleet is a time-honoured tradition which dates back many centuries with some origins traced back to early Greek fisherman, the port company says.

Events in ports around the world can range from a simple ceremony to a multi-day festival including church services, parades, dancing, feasting and contests.

Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club’s 2021 Blessing of the Boats flotilla at the mouth of the LiffeyThe flotilla at the mouth of the Liffey | Credit: Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club

Published in Dublin Port
The annual Blessing of the Boats took place recently at Rush Sailing Club, the North County Leader reports.
Local priest Fr Kieran Coughlan conducted the ceremony, which took place away from the boats this year due to particularly blustery conditions on the day.
Fr Coughlan also led the large gathering in paying tribute to Skerries fishermen Ronan Browne and David Gilsenan, who lost their lives last month.
The North County Leader has more on the story HERE.

The annual Blessing of the Boats took place recently at Rush Sailing Club, the North County Leader reports.

Local priest Fr Kieran Coughlan conducted the ceremony, which took place away from the boats this year due to particularly blustery conditions on the day.

Fr Coughlan also led the large gathering in paying tribute to Skerries fishermen Ronan Browne and David Gilsenan, who lost their lives last month.

The North County Leader has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastal Notes

Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.