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Displaying items by tag: Carrybridge

Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat Douglas Euan & Kay Richards was launched on Tuesday afternoon (26 October) to assess a fishing boat with three people on board, which had broken down around a mile northeast of Knockninny on Upper Lough Erne.

Once on scene, the lifeboat located the casualty vessel which had blown onto an exposed shoreline on an island amid Force 4-5 southwesterly gusts.

The volunteer helm and crew assessed the vessel and the wellbeing of the persons on board from a close but safe distance, and found they were all well.

It was established that the casualty vessel had suffered engine failure, and due to the strong winds had been blown onto the shoreline of the island.

After a full review of the situation, and due to the large waves landing on the island shoreline, the helm deemed the safest option was to put two volunteer crew from the lifeboat onto the other side of the island which was sheltered from the waves.

The crew then walked the three persons across the island to this safer location to get onboard the lifeboat. They were brought back to the nearest safe marina which was Knockninny public jetty.

The volunteer crew of the lifeboat then went back and refloated the fishing boat from the shoreline and brought it to the safety of Knockninny.

Speaking following the callout, Carrybridge lifeboat operations manager Stephen Scott had advice for all boat users in Northern Ireland and elsewhere.

“Before setting out on your journey, please check the weather forecast for the day ahead, have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble and have lifejackets for all onboard,” he said.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat was launched yesterday afternoon (Friday 10 September) to assess a cabin cruiser with two people on board which had broken down some two miles southeast of Knockninny in Co Fermanagh.

Once on scene on Upper Lough Erne, the volunteers established that the casualty vessel had suffered fuel issues and drifted into reeds in a small bay.

After a full review of the situation, lifeboat helm Chris Cathcart deemed the safest option was to carefully tow the vessel into deeper water, and then to proceed to tow it back to the nearest safe berth which was Knockninny public jetty.

With the owner’s permission, a stern tow was established from the lifeboat to the casualty vessel, and it was taken back to Knockninny where it was safely secured at the jetty.

Speaking following the callout, Cathcart echoed his previous advice for boat users, many of whom will be making the most of the remaining weeks of the 2021 cruising season.

“Before setting out on your journey, please plan your route and carry out regular checks of their vessels prior to going afloat and also throughout your journey,” he said.

“Have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble, have lifejackets for all on board and plan their journey using the relevant charts.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat and rescue water craft were launched yesterday afternoon (Saturday 28 August) to assess a vessel in distress with five people on board.

The sport cruiser had run aground some two miles upstream from Bellanaleck in the vicinity of Tamlaght Bay.

Upon arrival, the lifeboat crew assessed the vessel and those on board, and determined that the boat was slightly aground in its present position.

With the owner’s permission, the cruiser was refloated and an alongside tow was set up to bring it into deeper water.

Further checks were carried out and the vessel was found to be in perfect working order before it was allowed to continue its journey.

Speaking following the callout, Chris Cathcart of Carrybridge RNLI offered advice for boat uses this UK bank holiday weekend.

“We would ask that everyone have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble, have lifejackets for all on board and plan their journey using the relevant charts.

“If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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At 6.30 pm on Saturday 29 May, Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat, Douglas Euan & Kay Richards was launched to a vessel with two people on board, which had run aground approx. 1 mile North East of Tiraroe public jetty.

Winds were North Westerly, Force 1. Visibility was excellent.

The lifeboat arrived with the casualty vessel which they found had run aground in shallow water. The volunteer crew checked the wellbeing of the people onboard the casualty vessel and the vessel itself and found all were safe and well. The boat was not taking on any water.

With the owner’s permission, a towline was established with the vessel and it was refloated and towed out to the main navigation channel.

After further maintenance checks were carried out, it was found that the vessel was able to proceed on its onward journey.

When the RNLI crew were about to assist the first casualty vessel, a second vessel also temporarily ran aground in the same vicinity of the shallows. It managed to refloat itself and the lifeboat crew signalled for it to come alongside so that they could check if it was ok.

The casualty vessel with two persons on board noted they had temporarily run aground, and when checked it was established that the crew onboard were safe and well and the vessel itself was undamaged. It proceeded on its onward journey.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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At 5.02 pm on Saturday 22 May, Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat at Enniskillen on Lough Erne was launched to a vessel with one person on board which had run aground approxmayelt one mile south of Belleisle Estate.

Winds were South Westerly, Force 2. Visibility was good with overcast conditions.

The lifeboat arrived at the casualty vessel and no water ingress found.

The water tank on the boat was emptied to assist the crew in refloating the vessel. With the owner’s permission, a tow was established, and the vessel was refloated and towed to deeper water. The vessel was then able to continue its journey.

Speaking following the call out, Chris Cathcart, Lifeboat Helm at Carrybridge RNLI advised all boat users: ‘‘As we enter the busy time of the year we would ask that everyone have a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble, have lifejackets for all on board and plan their journey using the relevant charts. If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is: 999 or 112 and ask for the Coastguard.’’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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At 3.45 pm on Sunday 25 April, Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat, Douglas Euan & Kay Richards and Rescue Water Craft (RWC) was launched to a vessel with two people on board, which had encountered engine difficulties approx. 2 miles north of Knockninny on Lough Erne.

Winds were North Westerly, Force 1. Visibility was excellent.

The lifeboat and RWC arrived with the casualty vessel which had drifted close to the shoreline. The volunteer crew checked the wellbeing of the people on the casualty boat and found they were safe and well. With the owner’s permission, a tow was established with the casualty vessel and the boat was then towed back to a private marina.

Just as the volunteer crew were returning at 5.00 pm to the lifeboat station at Carrybridge, Belfast Coastguard requested for both the lifeboat and RWC to assist a second vessel with 5 people on board which had run aground approx. 1 mile North East of Naan Island.

A second vessel with five people on board had run aground approx. one mile North East of Naan IslandA second vessel with five people on board had run aground approx. one mile North East of Naan Island

The people onboard the casualty vessel were found to be safe and well, and due to the shallow water conditions, the volunteer crew carefully transferred them all over to the lifeboat. This allowed the grounded vessel to be refloated and towed back to the Carrybridge Public Slipway.

Speaking following the call out, Stephen Scott, Lifeboat Operations Manager at Carrybridge RNLI advised all boat users: ‘‘As the Bank holiday approaches please take time to plan your journey with the relevant charts, lifejackets for all onboard and a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble. If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is: 999 or 112 and ask for the Coastguard.’’

Carrybridge Lifeboat Station was started in 2002 on Upper Lough Erne. It currently operates an Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat and a Rescue Water Craft

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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 Only a few days after Carrybridge RNLI which operates on Upper Lough Erne, received a generous donation from the Enniskillen Royal Boat Club, its Atlantic 85 Inshore lifeboat answered a shout yesterday (7th) to help a vessel with two people onboard which had developed engine difficulties.

The Douglas Euan and Kay Richards and a Rescue Watercraft arrived with the casualty vessel near the Share Discovery Village on the eastern shore of Upper Lough Erne.

Winds were South Westerly, Force 2 and visibility was good with overcast conditions. The crew found that the vessel had secured to a navigation marker and the people on the casualty boat were unharmed.

With the owner's permission, a tow was established, and the boat was then towed the short distance to Corradillar Quay.

On returning to the station the crew found a 4m section of a tree floating in the main navigation channel which was posing a significant risk to other water users. The crew were able to remove this from the water to allow for safe navigation.

Speaking following the call out, Stephen Scott, Lifeboat Operations Manager at Carrybridge RNLI advised all boat users: ''At this time of year when there isn't much boat movement on the water it is especially important before setting out to plan your journey, have the relevant charts required, lifejackets for all on board and a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble. If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is: 999 or 112 and ask for the Coastguard.''

Carrybridge Lifeboat Station was founded in 2002 on Upper Lough Erne

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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It’s 580 km from Malin Head to Mizen Head and this was the distance covered by members of the Enniskillen Royal Boat Club in a fund-raising virtual row in aid of the Carrybridge RNLI on Lough Erne and Action Mental Health. The boat club is part of Enniskillen Royal Grammar School and has established itself as one of the top rowing clubs in the UK and Ireland. It is set in the historic school grounds’ Lough Shore site at the Portora Boat House.

Carrybridge lifeboat station is located at the village of Carrybridge on Upper Lough Erne, providing protection for those who use that Lough and its surrounding inland waterways.

The rowers handed over a substantial donation of £3,035.03, raised by the challenge to virtually row, run or cycle the distance of 580km. Shannon Clawson also carried out the return journey.

Stephen Scott of Carrybridge RNLI praised the rowers at ERBC for all their hard work and dedication raising money for both the RNLI and for Action Mental Health. “The funds raised will have a significant impact for the crews at both Carrybridge and Enniskillen and will assist with future lifesaving operations.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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As the RNLI continues to operate as normal during the Covid-19 pandemic, the charity is still unable to fundraise out in person in the community.

With more people needing the lifeboat crews as they stay home, support from the public is more important than ever — and Carrybridge RNLI in Northern Ireland is one unit that has risen to the challenge by making it easier for people to back their vital work.

The RNLI operates two lifeboat stations for Upper and Lower Lough Erne, at Carrybridge and Enniskillen respectively, and has seen a drop in funds raised locally in 2020 as traditional fundraising activities had to be cancelled.

In many cases, when the lifeboat pager goes off, volunteers will need to abandon homeschooling or work and head to the lifeboat station to answer the call for help.

Stephen Scott, lifeboat operations manager at Carrybridge RNLI, says: “We couldn’t do what we do without the support of the public. The RNLI has experienced a drop in funds locally, but we are rescuing more people than ever before.

“We are facing challenging times and are calling on people to consider making a donation this year to ensure we can continue saving lives on inland waters.

“We have moved our fundraising online in these challenging times and set up a JustGiving page for the lifeboat station where people can donate directly to their local lifeboat station in Carrybridge.”

To support the RNLI at Carrybridge, helping to ensure the charity’s brave volunteers can continue saving lives on Lough Erne, visit their JustGiving page HERE.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

At 4.17pm on Wednesday 4 March, Carrybridge RNLI’s inshore lifeboat, Douglas Euan & Kay Richards, and Rescue Water Craft (RWC) was launched to a vessel with one person on board which had run aground approx. 2 miles North of Carrybridge.

Winds were North West, Force 1. Visibility was good with clear conditions.

The lifeboat and RWC arrived with the casualty vessel which had run aground due to the high-water levels at present. The volunteer crew checked the wellbeing of the passenger on the casualty boat and the vessel itself and found all was were ok.

With the owner’s permission, a tow was established with the casualty vessel and it was refloated into deeper water. The craft was checked for damage and all was found to be in order. The vessel with its one person onboard was able to continue on its onward journey.

Speaking following the call out, Chris Cathcart, Volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer at Carrybridge RNLI advised all boat users: ‘‘At this time of year when the water levels are higher than normal, it is especially important before setting out to plan your journey, have the relevant charts required, lifejackets for all on board and a means of calling for assistance if you find yourself in trouble. If you see someone in trouble on the water or are in difficulties yourself the number to dial is: 999 or 112 and ask for the Coastguard.’’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.

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