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Displaying items by tag: Claddagh Basin

Galway’s Claddagh Basin may be a venue for next year’s Irish kayak polo intervarsities contest.

The event may take place in the city canal basin in February 2024, Galway City Council says.

It is one of several water polo activities which will take place in the basin, following efforts by the Lough Corrib Navigation Trustees to generate interest among watersports bodies in using the location free of charge.

The Claddagh Basin has been used in the past for kayaking and water polo and, latterly, has been a location for illuminated gleoiteogs and other traditional craft, restored by Badóirí an Cladaigh.The Claddagh Basin has been used in the past for kayaking and water polo and, latterly, has been a location for illuminated gleoiteogs and other traditional craft, restored by Badóirí an Cladaigh Photo:  Joe O'Shaughnessy

The Claddagh Basin has been used in the past for kayaking and water polo and, latterly, has been a location for illuminated gleoiteogs and other traditional craft, restored by Badóirí an Cladaigh.

Along with the Claddagh quays, it was constructed in the mid-19th century as part of the Eglinton Canal project and provided moorings for some 300 fishing craft working from the Claddagh village

When Galway City Council advertised earlier this year for expressions of interest in water-related activities, there were no replies by the closing date of May 12th.

The city council says that the late application for water polo activities ensures that it will be used this summer by Corrib Water Polo Club and Tribes Water Polo Club for training and matches.

The 143m by 52m canal basin close to the river Corrib estuary is maintained by the Lough Corrib Navigation Trustees for Galway City Council under the 1859 Navigation Act.The 143m by 52m canal basin close to the river Corrib estuary is maintained by the Lough Corrib Navigation Trustees for Galway City Council under the 1859 Navigation Act Photo:  Joe O'Shaughnessy

“In addition, there will potentially be a kayak polo event in February 2024, which forms part of next year's Irish Kayaking Intervarsities Competition,” the city council said.

The 143m by 52m canal basin close to the river Corrib estuary is maintained by the Lough Corrib Navigation Trustees for Galway City Council under the 1859 Navigation Act.

The trustees, including city councillors, are responsible for the maintenance of navigation aids, a limited number of piers on the Corrib system, maintenance of the Eglinton Canal system, associated walkways, towpaths, lock gates and boundary walls.

Published in Galway Harbour

Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.