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Displaying items by tag: County Manager

#CruiseLinersThe Irish Times reports that the outgoing county manager of Dún Laoghaire Rathdown County Council is to seek approval to spend more than €7 million on various projects among them the development of berthing facilities for super-cruisers in Dún Laoghaire Harbour.

Owen Keegan, who will take up his new post as Dublin city manager on Tuesday, will seek to cement his seven-year legacy in the county by ensuring funding for certain projects is secured before his departure on the preceeding Monday.

In a report to Dún Laoghaire councillors in advance of Monday's meeting, Mr Keegan said 12 cruisers had called at Dún Laoghaire this year, bringing 27,000 visitors, and Irish ports had attracted 220 cruise calls in 2012. But Dublin was missing out because neither the city's port nor Dún Laoghaire could accept ships of more than 300m in length.

The council had been assisting Dún Laoghaire Harbour Company in developing the port as a destination for cruise ships, he said, and the next stage would involve developing plans for a new cruise facility and applying directly to An Bord Pleanála for planning permission through the strategic infrastructure development process.

The cost of the plan is €650,000 and Mr Keegan is to seek approval for the council to contribute €250,000.

 

Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.