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Plans for Dublin Bay Sailing Club's (DBSC) 'training' mini-series starting this Saturday are advancing with the country's largest yacht racing club updating members this week. 

The vintage Water Wags, one of the club's strongest dinghy classes, have now confirmed that they will also take part in the race training mini-series. 

As Afloat previously reported, DBSC Keelboat race-training will take place on Saturdays and Thursdays with a full programme to include regular Tuesdays night racing beginning when full competition resumes on June 7th. 

The Water Wag class will take part in the race training mini-seriesThe Water Wag class will take part in the race training mini-series

Race Training between Saturday 15th May and 7th June

  • Keelboat fleets on Thursdays and Saturdays only
  • Dinghy Fleets on Tuesdays and Saturdays
  • Water Wags on Wednesdays

As this series is designed to train crews, DBSC will use its regular Sailing Instructions to allow 'training for racing to be as realistic as possible'.

Some Classes may have to be capped or split as guidelines only allow for 15 boats to race train from each class or in each race training start.

Where possible, some classes may have to be split and joined with another class in order to meet the quota. To ensure these requirements are met, DBSC will be contacting some Class Captains to ask for their assistance in ensuring they are covid compliant.

Training is being provided for our Race Management Personnel who are working under COVID compliant conditions which calls for restricted numbers on committee boatsTraining is being provided for our Race Management Personnel who are working under COVID compliant conditions which calls for restricted numbers on committee boats

DBSC is working hard to ensure all those who have entered in time and expressed interest in participating in race training will be facilitated.  However, if sailors or boats decide of their own accord to go out without having registered with DBSC their intention and there is more than the prescribed number of boats on the line, race training will be delayed with an AP Flag or may have to be abandoned for that day.

DBSC Specific Instructions for the Training Mini-Series

Covid Compliance

1.1 All Skippers shall enforce Covid Compliance within their POD

1.2 Dinghies must be able to right a capsize without assistance

1.3 Boats without engines must be able to return to shore without assistance

1.4 There should be no gathering ashore outside a boats POD

1.5 Should more than 45 Dinghies present for training all training for that day may be abandoned

1.6 Sailors must follow the Covid guidelines of the club. marina or slip they launch from and take personal responsibility for the safety of themselves and others while launching.

2 Start Limits

2.1 There will be no more than 15 boats on a start line. All boats not within their warning signal must keep clear of starting line to ensure the integrity of the POD system

2.2 Should more than 15 boats appear at the start racing for that class may be abandoned

2.3 it may be necessary to adjust start times and fleet make up to ensure there are no more than 15 boats per start. This will be notified by email and on the DBSC Web Site.

3 Training Outcome measurement

3.1 All boats will be given a finish place and handicapped classes will also be given a finish time

3.2 Outcomes may not be posted after each day but will be posted at the end of the series for sailors to evaluate their improvement

Published in DBSC

Long-awaited race 'training' gets underway on Dublin Bay in ten days time thanks to Dublin Bay Sailing Club that has announced a May Mini-Series this evening.

In line with government guidelines, DBSC will run a Mini-Series this month in order for crews and DBSC race management teams to train and to get ready for the racing season.

The Mini-Series will run on the regular DBSC Race nights of Tuesdays, Thursday and Saturdays. Preference for the Water Wags dinghies that race on Wednesday evenings at Dun Laoghaire Harbour are not yet established. 

DBSC says "Sailing is now considered a safe, non-contact sport with no material difference between training and competition". The club also says "As we have not been granted approval for full competition this series will run for three weeks or until DBSC is given approval to start its AIB DBSC summer series". 

Covid compliant

This series will be Covid compliant and DBSC requests that all participants remember that there should be no group gatherings after each day's programme.

"Sailing is now considered a safe, non-contact sport with no material difference between training and competition" 

DBSC Committee vessels will run in a pod system and all participants should also ensure their boats are organised in pods. All boats should be equipped with hand sanitiser and be Covid aware.

DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan at the Club's 'Asgard' race mark on Dublin Bay DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan at the Club's 'Asgard' race mark on Dublin Bay

DBSC Committee Boat teams will undergo training. ROs and Timers will apply RRS 2021-24 and times will be taken. However, we will not be posting the times of boats after each training day, but they will be made available at the end of the mini-series.

As Afloat reported previously, the focus for this series is on warm-ups and crew training after a long absence from sailing.

Some boats may not be able to participate due to lack of pods or other reasons, therefore, performance times will not count for overall points in the subsequent AIB DBSC racing summer series

Registered members

This mini-series will commence on Saturday 15th May and is open to all current registered DBSC Members who opt-in using the DBSC survey sent by email. Please note that in order to ensure compliance, there may be a need to cap some classes. Should there be more entries than can be catered for, entries will be accepted in the order of registration for DBSC 2021 season

Start Times & Fleet Composition

Start times and fleet make up will be decided on Friday 7th May, on the basis of entries and with Covid compliance paramount. Race times for this mini-series will be issued after Friday 7th May. The intention is that, if possible, Course card 2 as received will apply for normal AIB DBSC Summer series, as soon as this is permitted.

Note under Irish Sailing guidelines dinghies must be able to self right without assistance and non – powered boats must be able to return to the dock without assistance.

Published in DBSC

139 yachts and dinghies are now signed up for the Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) Summer Season.

Following the Government announcement of the easing of COVID-19 restrictions, the club is expecting to hear news of when club training and racing can start this week.

The country's biggest sailing league on Dublin Bay had been targeting a return on May 4th. While this is not confirmed, DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan told Afloat the club is awaiting "guidance" but "would be hopeful for a return to our full racing programme pretty soon". 

As sailing has been described as a low-risk outdoor no-contact sport with little difference in the sport between training and competition modes, more clarity has been requested on the resumption date for yacht racing currently given as June 7th.

Racing in DBSC's summer series on Dublin BayRacing in DBSC's summer series on Dublin Bay

DBSC's Hon Sec Chris Moore said the club expected to "receive confirmation of a start date on Tuesday" (May 3rd). 

Meanwhile, DBSC has laid its marks, prepared courses and made arrangements for an immediate start to its AIB sponsored season that traditionally begins in the last week of April for a fleet of up to 200 boats and 1200 sailors on the capital's waters. "We're ready to go whenever", Kirwan said.

Published in DBSC

Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) has introduced a new cruiser Four Non-Spinnaker Open Class for the 2021 season.

"The new class is In response to the increasing demand for short-handed and non-spinnaker cruiser racing as reported in a number of recent articles in Afloat", according to DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan.

This new class initiative is for those who want competitive performance racing without the use of Spinnakers, Gennakers and Bloopers. It will suit those who like sailing short-handed or even fully crewed and want the fun of racing without the need to handle spinnakers etc.

Significantly, furling headsails – often a bone of contention in white sails racing – will not be mandatory.

DBSC's existing Cruisers 5 class will continue to be a separate class racing under their White Sails Class rules that mandate furling headsails.

Boats with a valid ECHO handicap cert, and/or a non-spinnaker IRC TCF of .820 or above and who conform to the DBSC Cruisers 4 Non-Spinnaker class rules shall be eligible to apply for entry.

A final decision on entry will be under the direction of the DBSC Committee.

Boats for the new DBSC class four must be monohull, with a minimum of 2 sleeping bunks, internal seating accommodation for 4 persons. In addition, they must have an inboard engine, at least one head and a cooker.Boats for the new DBSC class four must be monohull, with a minimum of 2 sleeping bunks, internal seating accommodation for 4 persons. In addition, they must have an inboard engine, at least one head and a cooker

The rules for the new class are below. 

DBSC Cruisers 4 Non-Spinnaker Open Class:

  • Boats with a valid ECHO handicap cert, and/or a non-spinnaker IRC TCF of .820 or above and who conform to the DBSC Cruisers 4 Non-Spinnaker class rules shall be eligible to apply for entry. The final decision on entry will be under the direction of the DBSC Committee
  • Boats must be monohull, with a minimum of 2 sleeping bunks, internal seating accommodation for 4 persons. In addition, they must have an inboard engine, at least one head and a cooker.
  • Boats shall display the Numeral Pennant “4” on their backstay.
  • Boats who wish to race under ECHO and/or IRC handicap shall have a current valid certificate. New entrants to the class may be given an initial loading of up to 10% on their ECHO handicap.
  • Only a single headsail shall be used while racing.
  • Sail identification number on mainsail is required.
  • Spinnakers, Bloopers, Gennakers, Code Zero or similar sails are not allowed.
  • Whisker or spinnaker poles are allowed for headsails.
Published in DBSC

Welcome to Nautical Limbo Land. This weekend may see the annual start-of-season lift-ins – with masked-up socially-distanced protocols - at the Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club, the National YC, and the Royal St George Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire. But as was discussed here a week ago, it will be somewhere around the 20th April before it's clear whether or not the inevitable behind-doors socialising of the Easter Weekend has led to a fresh peak in the currently almost-plateaued pandemic infection rate. And officially it's 26th April before limited activity will be permitted in specialised outdoor sports such as tennis, sailing and golf.

There are those – particularly lone sailors of every hue from paddleboarders to top Laser performers – who have been pushing their particular envelopes to the absolute limit afloat. But equally, there are those for whom sailing simply isn't worth resuming until it re-emerges – if it ever does – as the carefree sociable activity of yore, in which skills of seamanship and sailing techniques are as important as ever, but you no longer find your activities hampered at every turn by considerations of social distancing and bubble maintenance.

Out on his own - the lone kite-surfer in Dublin Bay is at much less risk of COVID infection than the passengers on the cross-channel ferryOut on his own - the lone kite-surfer in Dublin Bay is at much less risk of COVID infection than the passengers on the cross-channel ferry

A crisp email from a sociable skipper sums it up: "Whatever other crews may be doing, our lot aren't going racing again until we're all Pfull of Pfizer". Now that's telling it like it is. But the ultimate nationwide logistical challenges in fulfilling its demands scarcely bear thinking about.

Nevertheless "Get Pfull of Pfizer and Sail for Ireland" has quite a ring to it, and it makes for an inspiring aspiration. But as we've learned through the long and dreary unwinding of the Great Pandemic Experience, predictions of when and how we can resume specific activities are very difficult to make with any real accuracy, mainly because they involve the future. And it emerges that the supposedly smooth-running roll-out is neither smooth nor rolling, as yet another glitch emerges somewhere along the line in the supply chain and the supply train moving it.

There they are – gone…..Today (Saturday's) lift-in at the National YC is one of three similar club operations this weekend in Dun Laoghaire. Photo: Afloat.ie   There they are – gone…..Today (Saturday's) lift-in at the National YC is one of three similar club operations this weekend in Dun Laoghaire. Photo: Afloat.ie  

Time was when trains were a matter of romance and song, but this has all become so deadly serious that's it's just not on to envisage The Vacc-Supply Train as a topic for a hypnotically rhythmic railroad song on the lines of The City of New Orleans (Willie Nelson your only man), or the Rock Island Line, and even less so with The Orange Blossom Special.

So we keep the head down and plod on towards late April, sustained and encouraged by the knowledge that in the brief suspensions of Lockdowns last summer, Ireland was indisputably a world leader in providing local racing and offshore challenges which stayed within guidelines, and yet managed to keep our sport and many of our clubs alive and active, albeit in an often decidedly muted way.

Sister power…..the Murphy family's Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo – with one of the sisters on the helm – cutting a dash in the first evening race of the truncated 2020 Royal Cork YC Club Programme on Thursday July 9th. In addition to club racing, Nieulargo won both the Kinsale-Fastnet-Kinsale and the Fastnet 450 Races to be "Boat of the Year". Photo: Robert BatemanSister power…..the Murphy family's Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo – with one of the sisters on the helm – cutting a dash in the first evening race of the truncated 2020 Royal Cork YC Club Programme on Thursday, July 9th. In addition to club racing, Nieulargo won both the Kinsale-Fastnet-Kinsale and the Fastnet 450 Races to be "Boat of the Year". Photo: Robert Bateman

This was done through quiet and thorough behind-the-scenes planning and organisation in order to minimise the shore-crowd element of any event, sometimes to the point that a compliant event might be taking place afloat, but there wasn't a soul to be found ashore, with Dublin Bay SC setting the pace by moving their entire race administration activity aboard their Committee Boats.

Thus in the current febrile national sporting mood, with recreational control freaks ready to leap on anyone making plans for some sporting activity that starts to explore the limits of what's possible, we wouldn't dream at the moment of contacting those who successfully organised special events last year and will be expected to do the same this time round. And equally in the current fluid situation, now is not the time to challenge those who have flagged significant events for the early to mid part of the hoped-for season to confirm definitely whether or not those events will actually happen.

By moving their entire Race Administration operation aboard their Committee Boats, Dublin Bay SC succeeded in running a comprehensive COVID-compliant programme in 2020 which resulted in the club's acclamation as the Mitsubishi Motors Club of the YearBy moving their entire Race Administration operation aboard their Committee Boats, Dublin Bay SC succeeded in running a comprehensive COVID-compliant programme in 2020 which resulted in the club's acclamation as the Mitsubishi Motors Club of the Year

That said, from last year we have some knowledge of what can be made to work. Other things being equal, keep it local and keep it on the water – offshore if need be – and you're half way there. Beyond that, keep it young. We know that sailing is always reaching out to more senior age groups for introductory courses, but the fact is the potential infection rate tends to decline with a younger cohort, and young people have a greater need to be shown how to be doing something than older folk who, having reached a certain stage in life, should have sufficient reserves of character to think and act for themselves in a regulation-compliant way.

Even when a limited amount of post-race shoreside socializing was permitted last year, it was found that there were many who were more than satisfied to go quietly afloat, have their race, then stow the boat afloat or ashore, and simply go straight home again.

VOLVO DUN LAOGHAIRE REGATTA HITS THE SPOT

VDLR Chairman Don O'Dowd was ahead of the curve in leading his Committee into organising a re-structured two-part regatta to cope with post-pandemic conditions   VDLR Chairman Don O'Dowd was ahead of the curve in leading his Committee into organising a re-structured two-part regatta to cope with post-pandemic conditions

So in trying to move what's implicit in this behavioural pattern on to a larger scale, the clear message is that "local-ness" is the essence of it all, and the biennial Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta – while having a significant international element in its eclectic entry list – must be unrivalled in the number of participants who live right beside or within easy distance of Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

With the regatta being served by four club and forecourt complexes - three of which are notably spacious - together with the shore space at the marina, any crowd pinch-points can be easily controlled, and yet you're dealing with overall crowd numbers which would swamp many a smaller venue in a non-compliant way.

The Water Wags and other One-Designs will have their Volvo Dun Laoghaire regatta from July 2nd to 4thThe Water Wags and other One-Designs will have their Volvo Dun Laoghaire regatta from July 2nd to 4th

Beyond that, Chairman Don O'Dowd and his Organising Committee put themselves even further ahead of the curve more than a year ago, when they announced a pandemic-induced re-framing of the regatta format into two extended weekends, one devoted to One Designs (2-4th July) and the other to Cruiser-Racers (8th to 11th July).

In these difficult times, classes have leapt at the convenient opportunity to make the VDLR one of their regional championships, or even the national championship itself. Overall, entries are already running beyond the 300 mark, and with Early Bird Entry still available until April 16th, this has a refreshing air of certainty about it, a classic case of a problem situation being turned into an opportunity to create something exciting and new.

Cruiser-Racer action in the Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta – this year, their Regatta will be the long weekend of July 8th to 11th. Photo: Afloat.ie/David O'Brien   Cruiser-Racer action in the Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta – this year, their Regatta will be the long weekend of July 8th to 11th. Photo: Afloat.ie/David O'Brien  

Nevertheless we'd argue that in mid-April with some disturbing international pandemic statistics emerging, it is pointless and indeed irritating to constantly chivvy organisers of other proposed events as to whether or not their fixture is going to take place.

You'll know the events we mean. And we'd argue that any owner-skipper who – in the current exceptional circumstances – finds it beyond his or her capabilities to firm up a challenge crew at just three weeks notice (or perhaps even less time) may well be somewhat out of their depth in the first place. Meanwhile, others find their way as best they can through a changing sea of circumstances. 

Once upon a time…..in times past, as at the Kingstown Harbour Centenary VDLR Regatta in 2017, social distancing was unknown, but for 2021 things will have to be done differently. Photo: VDLROnce upon a time…..in times past, as at the Kingstown Harbour Centenary VDLR Regatta in 2017, social distancing was unknown, but for 2021 things will have to be done differently. Photo: VDLR

Published in W M Nixon
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Dublin Bay Sailing Club Commodore Ann Kirwan says the club aims to start its 2021 summer race series in mid-May despite the lack of clear guidance for the sport following last night's cautious easing of lockdown restrictions by the Government. 

This means the country's largest yacht racing club will start approximately three weeks later than its normal start date at the end of April.

As Afloat previously reported, DBSC has confirmed plans for the 2021 season despite its Winter and Spring racing hiatus and preparations are now well underway.

The club runs year-round racing for up to 300 yachts and dinghies in over 20 different classes.

Kirwan told Afloat, "Despite the lack of clarity in the Government announcement, DBSC is still hopeful that we may begin our season in some form before mid-May". 

Dublin Bay Sailing Club Commodore Ann KirwanDublin Bay Sailing Club Commodore Ann Kirwan

“A lot of work has to be done behind the scenes to provide the standard of racing everyone knows and expects,” Rear Commodore Jacqueline McStay says.

“The racing sub-committee is preparing the courses, whilst committee member Philip Ferguson with the help of Chris Moore is checking and working on the marks so they are ready to be deployed in the bay by mid-April.”

Entries for the country's biggest sailing league are materialising with Cruisers Five fleet receiving the biggest early entry for the AIB-sponsored Summer Series.

The Government has announced the phased easing of some Covid-19 restrictions during the month of April.

They plan to continue this cautious approach, gradually easing restrictions, while a substantial level of the population are vaccinated during April, May and June, after which, it should be safe to reopen society more widely.

The Taoiseach said from April 19 some additional high-performance training will be allowed, including senior inter-county GAA training to facilitate national league competitions starting in May.

He said training for high performing athletes approved by Sport Ireland will also be allowed. 

Mr Martin said from April 26 outdoor sports training for under 18s can begin again.

He said golf and outdoor tennis can be played and there will be a return to 'distanced sport' but it is still unclear as to what interpretation is being given to sailing.

Published in DBSC

Dublin Bay Sailing Club's Cruisers Five fleet has the biggest early entry for 2021’s AIB-sponsored Summer Series due to start next month. 

Entries for the country's biggest sailing league are materialising even though there is no clarity yet on the scheduled April 25th start date due to current lockdown restrictions.

Division Five also known as the 'White Sails' or the 'Non-Spinnaker' category have 12 entries received so far (from a possible 29 of previous years) for summer racing for prizes that include the Burford Trophy for the best performance on IRC on Thursday night racing, typically the biggest DBSC turnout of the week.

Popular J109s race in DBSC Cruisers One division Photo: AfloatPopular J109s race in DBSC Cruisers One division Photo: Afloat

The White Sails have the most entries of the IRC divisions so far with the hotly contested Cruisers One division with nine entries in.

In the one designs, Six Beneteau 211s are entered and five Flying Fifteens

Although it had a massive entry of 65 boats in 2020 and another big entry is expected again, so far there are only three single-handed Laser dinghies signed up.

All the entries can be viewed live on the DBSC site here

Glen keelboats are among DBSC's 20 classes preparing for the 2021 season Photo: AfloatGlen keelboats are among DBSC's 20 classes preparing for the 2021 season Photo: Afloat

DBSC has confirmed plans for the 2021 season despite its Winter and Spring racing hiatus with preparations well underway for April “A lot of work has to be done behind the scenes to provide the standard of racing everyone knows and expects,” Rear Commodore Jacqueline McStay says.

“The racing sub-committee is preparing the courses, whilst committee member Philip Ferguson with the help of Chris Moore is checking and working on the marks so they are ready to be deployed in the bay by mid-April.”

“We are working to ensure we are ready for the off!”, McStay says.

Published in DBSC

Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) has confirmed plans and preparations are well underway for 2021’s AIB-sponsored Summer Series.

“A lot of work has to be done behind the scenes to provide the standard of racing everyone knows and expects,” Rear Commodore Jacqueline McStay says.

“The racing sub-committee is preparing the courses, whilst committee member Philip Ferguson with the help of Chris Moore is checking and working on the marks so they are ready to be deployed in the bay by mid April.”

“We are working to ensure we are ready for the off!”

Published in DBSC
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Dublin Bay Sailing Club's (DBSC) 18-boat Cruiser Two fleet has elected a new Class Captain for its 2021 season following its online AGM this week.

The DBSC Cruiser 2/Sigma33 AGM was held via ViCo on 04.02.2021. The current Class Captain, Lindsay J. Casey, welcomed all attendees and gave a brief review of the DBSC 2020 Summer Season noting that the class had been fortunate to have Dublin Bay racing in the period July – September 2020.

The DBSC Cruisers Two fleet comprises a mix of popular yacht designs including Sigma 33s, Corby 26s, X99s, and J97s among others. 

Lindsay congratulated DBSC for the expertise and dedication of their volunteers in organising racing in such difficult and uncertain circumstances. Despite the relatively short season, it was enjoyed and appreciated by all who participated. He thanked the Race officers and all the volunteers on Mac Lir.

Windjammer J97The DBSC Cruisers Two (2597) Windjammer (Lindsay J. Casey/ Denis Power) from the RStGYC Photo: Afloat

Lindsay also advised that he was standing down as Class Captain. He welcomed the newly elected Class Captain, Frank Cleere, wishing him every success. Frank is a very keen yachtsman with approximately 20 year's sailing experience since he started sailing when he was 9 years old. He has had considerable experience racing in Cruisers 2 as a member of the J97 Windjammer team since 2017 and previously with Bendemeer from 2009. He also has experience in DBSC Cruisers 1; DBSC Sportboat fleet; 1720 campaigns; three very successful Round Ireland campaigns; and five consecutive years winning ISORA IRC Class 2.

Commenting on his election, Frank said “I am delighted and honoured to be elected the Cruiser 2/Sigma 33 Class Captain. I’d like to thank the outgoing Class Captain for maintaining a firm hand on the tiller. I’m looking forward to what will hopefully be an exciting, enjoyable, competitive and safe DBSC 2021 Summer Season with more time on the water when compared with the 2020 Season. Liaising with DBSC is an important aspect of a class captain’s brief and will continue with what has been a very successful dialogue to date.”

Published in DBSC

2020 was a record season for the Dublin Bay Laser Class, and by all accounts, they’re expecting an even bigger season in 2021.

While continuous sailing has been difficult for all fleets since the start of the pandemic, the single-handed Laser fleet has fared better than most, and as a result, its popularity has surged. For the 2020 Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) summer series, the Laser had the highest number of entries compared with any other fleet, with over 90 boats registered. Entries were split across the Standard, Radial and 4.7 rigs with both adult and junior sailors taking part.

Lasers are proving to be a very versatile boat, especially in these turbulent times. Local active sailors range in age from teenagers as young as 13 right through to adults in their 50s and 60s. The fleet is also very well balanced between female and male sailors with both genders across the ages competing as equals, particularly in the Radial and 4.7 rigs.

"with the constant changes in COVID restrictions, the Laser is providing a more consistent sailing experience"

Local class captain Brendan Hughes explained why there is an expectation of even bigger numbers in 2021; “We’ve seen interest in the fleet continue to grow especially amongst adults. Many of these already sail cruisers but with the constant changes in restrictions, the Laser is providing a more consistent sailing experience. We’re the only large fleet that has been able to get out on the water in nearly all levels of lockdown.”

As a competitive single-hander, Hughes acknowledges that the Laser can be perceived by some as a challenging boat to sail. “In 20 knots, the Laser can be a challenge for sure! However, there has been a lot of effort put into training across Dun Laoghaire. Right throughout the year, there is coaching taking place for beginners and competitive sailors at both junior and adult level.” The increase in coaching availability over the past number of years is acknowledged by many new sailors as being critical in making this class more accessible.

Dublin Bay's new Laser dinghy Class Captain Brendan HughesDublin Bay's new Laser dinghy Class Captain Brendan Hughes

In addition, constant adjustments to racing formats have helped to ensure the Laser fleet remains vibrant. During 2020, the DBSC dinghy race officers introduced Saturday racing in addition to Tuesday evening racing for the Laser fleet. This proved to be extremely popular and the Laser fleet was eager to see this continued in 2021. The club has confirmed that the format will continue for the new season of the AIB DBSC Summer Series with the entry fee covering both Tuesdays and Saturdays for all sailors.

A number of headline events in 2021 taking place in Dublin Bay are expected to drive continued interest from new sailors. The Irish Laser Master Nationals event will be hosted in Dun Laoghaire’s Royal St George Yacht Club from 12th -13th June. This event is open to all sailors over the age of 35 and the organisers expect to have 50+ boats from across the country participate.

A recent survey of local Laser sailors revealed that over 120 boats intend to participate in the Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta One Design Championship taking place 2nd - 4th July. “If even two-thirds of that number participate in this new format, it would be the largest one-design fleet on the water at this year’s event, which is very exciting.” says Hughes.

August sees the International Laser Class Association (ILCA) 4.7 World Championship coming to Dublin Bay. Local organisers are expecting several hundred youth sailors from across the globe to participate in this event. This event will be one of the biggest sailing events to take place in Ireland this year and is a great opportunity for our younger sailors to participate on the world stage.

Afloat also hears that planning has begun amongst the Masters fleet to send a delegation to Malta in November. EurILCA, the European Laser organisation is holding its Euro Masters Regatta at Royal Malta Yacht Club from 4th - 7th November.

With a mix of local, national and international Laser events taking place in Dublin Bay this summer, it sounds like another big year for the fleet. More information on Laser sailing in Dun Laoghaire is available by emailing [email protected]

Published in Laser
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Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.

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