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Dublin Port Dublin Port announced today (28 August) that work has commenced on the Tolka-Estuary Greenway, a dedicated 3.2km cycle and pedestrian route along the Northern perimeter of the Port overlooking the Tolka Estuary. The Tolka-Estuary Greenway is a celebration of an area of the Port that has never been accessed by the public before, and it is a key element of Dublin Port’s ambitious Tolka-Estuary Project first announced in November 2020.

The Tolka-Estuary project also includes the development of a 6.3km distributed museum within the Port, and the Liffey Tolka Greenway, a proposed additional tree-lined pedestrian and cycle route between the Liffey and the Tolka Estuary along the East Wall Road.

"The Tolka-Estuary Greenway is a celebration of an area of the Port that has never been accessed by the public before"

Lar Joye, Port Heritage Director, Dublin Port, said, “We are very excited seeing construction of this element of the Tolka-Estuary Project commence. By next summer Dubliners will be able to safely enjoy the River Liffey and Tolka Estuary on foot or by bike through the Port. The Tolka-Estuary Greenway will allow Dubliners enjoy novel perspectives of the city, the Estuary, its flora and fauna, the Port and eventually the Distributed Museum we are creating here, which includes the Pumphouse and the Flour Mill. We have always said that our ambition is to open up the Port as an amenity for the city and the Greenway will be transformative in this regard.”

The first section of the Tolka-Estuary Greenway stretches 1.9km from the Port’s boundary with Eastpoint Business Park to the Irish Ferries and Stena Line check-in booths on Terminal Road. The route required extensive coastal protection and heavy civil engineering works prior to construction but is now expected to open to the public by summer 2024. The second 1.3km section of the Greenway will bring the Greenway route to the most Eastern point of Dublin Port overlooking Dublin Bay and a brand new 800-metre linear park.

On completion Dublin Port’s Greenway will link Dublin with the proposed National Galway to Dublin Cycleway, a 270km dedicated traffic-free cycling route which follows the Royal Canal Greenway and the Old Rail Trail Greenway from Dublin via Maynooth and Athlone to Galway City. It will also link Ireland with EuroVelo 2, The Capitals Route, a 5,500km (3,400 mi) long cycling east-west European route which passes through Ireland, The United Kingdom, the Netherlands, German, Poland and Belarus. Tourists arriving in Ireland with their bikes from Holyhead in Wales and Cherbourg in France will now be able to leave the Dublin Port on this purpose-built greenway.

Dr. Úna May, CEO of Sport Ireland, said, “As National EuroVelo Coordinator, Sport Ireland also welcomes this proposed new infrastructure which will facilitate cyclists travelling the section of the EuroVelo 2 cycle route in Ireland, also known as the Galway – Dublin Cycleway. The proposed new greenways will bring cyclists arriving at the port on a route that will ultimately connect the port to the Royal Canal Greenway and onwards to the west of Ireland. Cycling is a fantastic way to stay active and improve overall fitness, and I am delighted to see work progressing on the development of dedicated cycling infrastructure in the Dublin Port area. As well as providing an opportunity for people who work in the port to cycle more safely to work, this infrastructure will provide traffic-free recreational cycling opportunities for the local community.”

The Distributed Museum within the Port includes The Pumphouse, which formerly housed the steam engine that powered the gates of Graving Docks 1 & 2 but has been repurposed by Dublin Port into an artistic and cultural venue and The Flour Mill, the former Odlums Flour Mill on Alexandra Road which will be transformed into a National Maritime Archive, two 300-seat performance venues, as well as studio and exhibition spaces for artists. The Flour Mill will be developed in stages as part of Masterplan 2040 alongside major port infrastructure projects.

Barry O’Connell, CEO, Dublin Port Company, said, “The Tolka-Estuary Greenway is another important milestone in delivering on our Port-City commitments as part of Masterplan 2040. The new cycling and pedestrian route linking the River Liffey with the Tolka-Estuary will no doubt prove to be an incredibly popular amenity and provide people with novel access to the Port and the opportunity to see the maritime and industrial landmarks along the route.”

Published in Dublin Port
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A new coastal rowing boat named after St Laurence was blessed in Ringsend, Dublin, today for the Stella Maris Rowing Club.

The St Laurence II has been sponsored by Dublin Port Company, and is named after the original St Laurence, which was built, owned and competed in by Dublin Port workers in the 1950s.

Dublin Port Company says it represents yet another investment by it in promoting the sport of rowing in Dublin.

Dublin Port Company CEO Barry O’Connell alongside Alicia Weafer, Trudi Pepper, Emma Gannon and Niamh Kane of the Stella Maris Rowing Club’s Under-16 Girls Team, who take to the water on their new coastal rowing boat, the St Laurence II, sponsored by Dublin Port Company.Dublin Port Company CEO Barry O’Connell alongside Alicia Weafer, Trudi Pepper, Emma Gannon and Niamh Kane of the Stella Maris Rowing Club’s Under-16 Girls Team, who take to the water on their new coastal rowing boat, the St Laurence II, sponsored by Dublin Port Company

Dublin Port Company CEO Barry O’Connell alongside Alicia Weafer, Trudi Pepper, Emma Gannon and Niamh Kane of the Stella Maris Rowing Club’s Under-16 Girls Team, who take to the water on their new coastal rowing boat, the St Laurence II, sponsored by Dublin Port Company.

It will also provide Stella Maris Rowing Club's dedicated members – ranging from aged ten onwards - with state-of-the-art equipment that will enhance their training and capabilities, the port company says.

(Left to Right) Coach Louise Kane with Niamh Kane, Emma Gannon, Trudi Pepper and Alicia Weafer of the Stella Maris Rowing Club’s Under-16 Girls Team take to the water on their new coastal rowing boat, the St Laurence II, sponsored by Dublin Port Company. Photo Tommy Dickson(Left to Right) Coach Louise Kane with Niamh Kane, Emma Gannon, Trudi Pepper and Alicia Weafer of the Stella Maris Rowing Club’s Under-16 Girls Team take to the water on their new coastal rowing boat, the St Laurence II Photo Tommy Dickson

“This continued and long-standing partnership comes as part of Dublin Port Company’s wider plans for a new maritime village,”it says

The village is part of its 3FM development project, and will involve a “modern sailing and rowing campus” for sailing and rowing clubs, sea scouts, the Nautical Trust and local boat owners.

The 3FM project is the port’s masterplan for 2040, and is focused on port lands on the Poolbeg peninsula, on the south side of the bay.

Dublin Port Company continues its support of Stella Maris Rowing Club with the sponsorship of the new skiffDublin Port Company continues its support of Stella Maris Rowing Club with the sponsorship of the new skiff (above and below Photos: Tommy DicksonDublin Port Company continues its support of Stella Maris Rowing Club with the sponsorship of the new skiff (above and below Photos: Tommy Dickson

The port says the village “has been developed in consultation with local groups and will replace the current much smaller facilities as well as improving opportunities to view port activities from the new waterside public plaza area”.

The new boat was blessed today by Father Ivan Tonge during a ceremony held at the Ringsend Club’s home on the Pigeon House Road in Dublin.

Founded in 1937, Stella Maris is one of Dublin's oldest and most respected rowing clubs, with levels from junior right up to senior.

The club recently won a Dublin South Central Garda Youth Award, which is awarded to young people who have contributed positively to their communities.

Barry O’Connell, Chief Executive, Dublin Port Company, said: “We are honoured to offer our continued support to Stella Maris Rowing Club. The values Stella embodies, such as teamwork, dedication and perseverance, align perfectly with our own ethos at Dublin Port Company."

(Left to Right) Coach Louise Kane with Niamh Kane, Emma Gannon, Trudi Pepper and Alicia Weafer of the Stella Maris Rowing Club’s Under-16 Girls Team take to the water on their new coastal rowing boat, the St Laurence II(Left to Right) Coach Louise Kane with Niamh Kane, Emma Gannon, Trudi Pepper and Alicia Weafer of the Stella Maris Rowing Club’s Under-16 Girls Team take to the water on their new coastal rowing boat, the St Laurence II Photo: Tommy Dickson

"This commitment ties in with our wider community initiatives to come under the 3FM Project, which will see a new maritime village providing enhanced facilities for a range of users, including sailing and rowing clubs.”

Dublin Port Company CEO Barry O’Connell (far right) with members of Stella Maris Rowing Club at the blessing of their new coastal rowing boatDublin Port Company CEO Barry O’Connell (far right) with members of Stella Maris Rowing Club at the blessing of their new coastal rowing boat Photo: Tommy Dickson

Pat Kane, Chairman, Stella Maris Rowing Club, said: “Dublin Port has long been a friend to Stella Maris, and we would like to thank them for their continued support. The original St Laurence served the club well for over 30 years and, thanks to Dublin Port, the St Laurence II will inspire and enable the next generation of rowers.”

Published in River Liffey

With Heritage Week upon us, the well-archived history of Dublin Port places the opening of its new Heritage Centre on Alexandra Road at the forefront of events, and with Cormac Lowth, they have the ideal maritime history enthusiast to put it all in context.

In fact, Cormac is a One Man Heritage Centre in himself, so the combination of his wide-ranging knowledge and perspective with the resources of Dublin Port provides a formidable partnership, and there'll be much of interest in the featured fully-illustrated lecture he'll be giving at the Centre next Saturday, August 19th, at 3.0pm.

Cormac Lowth Dublin Port lecture

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The Lord Mayor of Dublin Daithí de Róiste performed the ‘Casting of the Spear’ into Dublin Bay, upholding a 535-year tradition. The Casting marks the launch of the 36th South Docks Festival, which runs this week for a full five days for the first time since 2019.

Hosted by Dublin Port Company and the staff and volunteers of St. Andrew’s Resource Centre, the South Docks Festival offers the communities of the Docklands a chance to celebrate their heritage. One particular aspect of this heritage, the ‘Casting of the Spear’, today saw Dublin Lord Mayor Daithí de Róiste imbued with the title of Honorary Admiral of Dublin Port.

The tradition dates back to 1488, when then Lord Mayor of Dublin Thomas Mayler braced the elements to mark the boundaries of Dublin to the East by vaulting a spear into the sea. As each successive Lord Mayor casts a spear of their own, the tradition reinforces the idea that the city and the Port are at once constantly evolving and inextricably tied to a rich heritage to which all members of Dublin’s diverse community can lay claim. The South Docks Festival aims to highlight this shared heritage, with the theme of this year’s festival being ‘Friendship and Inclusion’.

Over the five days, the public can engage in activities for all ages, from TikTok workshops, tours of the Docklands and Dublin Port, and a short film exhibition exploring life in the Docklands through the pandemic. The festival will close on Friday with a parade leaving St. Andrew’s at 12:30 pm and proceeding through the Docklands, after which Pearse Square will be transformed into a fairground with picnic areas, an inflatable slide and obstacle course and live performances from DJs and children’s entertainers.

Dublin Port CEO Barry O’Connell commented: “I want to thank Lord Mayor de Róiste for helping to continue this great tradition and for his support of Dublin Port. I am happy to bring this ceremony back to the South Docks Festival, which allows the communities of the Docklands to come together and celebrate a distinct cultural heritage. Our mission at Dublin Port over the coming years is to strengthen ties between the Port and the city, by allowing the public access through a range of pedestrian pathways, cycle routes and arts spaces. We hope to bring communities together, in keeping with the tradition of this great festival.”

The Lord Mayor of Dublin and Honorary Admiral of Dublin Port, Cllr. Daithí de Róiste pictured performing the ‘Casting of the Spear’ in Dublin Bay with Dublin Port CEO Barry O’Connell. The tradition dates back to 1488 when the city’s boundaries were marked eastwards. Photo: Robbie ReynoldsThe Lord Mayor of Dublin and Honorary Admiral of Dublin Port, Cllr. Daithí de Róiste pictured performing the ‘Casting of the Spear’ in Dublin Bay with Dublin Port CEO Barry O’Connell. The tradition dates back to 1488 when the city’s boundaries were marked eastwards. Photo: Robbie Reynolds

Lord Mayor of Dublin Daithí de Róiste said: "As Honorary Admiral of Dublin Port, I offer my thanks to Dublin Port Company for the lovely ceremony and for their support of the South Docks Festival, which remains a special highlight of the summer calendar. Such an inclusive and welcoming festival is of great benefit to the public.”

Dermot McCarthy, Chair of the St. Andrew’s Resource Centre, said: “Our staff and volunteers greatly appreciate the contribution of Dublin Port Company to this year’s festival, which makes its full return following disruptions from the pandemic. We hope the community take the chance to see everything on the week’s schedule, which offers something for everyone.”

Published in Dublin Port
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Dublin Port Company has issued noticed to mariners of navigational changes for the Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta which begins on Thursday (6 July).

To ensure the safety of all concerned and to facilitate the management of such a large sailing event, the South Burford Traffic Separation Scheme will be closed to all commercial traffic on Thursday 6 July between noon and 6.30pm, and Friday 7, Saturday 8 and Sunday 9 July between 10am and 6.30pm.

Vessels arriving or departing Dublin Bay, including to/from the anchorage, during these times must use the North Burford Traffic Separation Scheme.

In addition, the port company has also issued a notice regarding the five temporary yacht markings that will be deployed in Dublin Bay for the duration of the regatta.

Published in Volvo Regatta

Dublin Port Company is recruiting for the role of energy and decarbonisation lead.

The State-owned commercial port says it “aims to play a strong role in achieving its own energy and decarbonisation goals, as well as supporting and influencing wider Dublin Port stakeholders in meeting their own energy reduction and decarbonisation ambitions”.

Dublin Port has 15,000 annual vessel movements, handles almost half of the Republic of Ireland’s trade, is the largest freight and passenger port in Ireland and is one of five major ports classified as Tier 1/Tier 2 ports in the National Ports Policy.

The energy and decarbonisation lead will head the development, implementation and delivery of plans to ensure that Dublin Port Company meets its energy and decarbonisation goals and commitments.

As the company provides critical national port infrastructure, the role will require a close working relationship with its stakeholders to ensure it understands their decarbonisation needs, in order to best support them in meeting their energy and decarbonisation goals.

The role will require leading the energy and decarbonisation team, especially working closely with the port’s technical manager, property and facilities manager and assistant harbour master, who are all key members of that team.

Key responsibilities also include work within energy and decarbonisation management, the NewERA Climate Action Framework for the Commercial Semi-State Sector, Dublin Port Energy & Decarbonisation Community, infrastructure and more.

Must-have requirements include a FETAC Level 8 undergraduate degree qualification in energy, environment, sustainability or an engineering discipline; a minimum of five years’ industry experience and ability to demonstrate competent knowledge in the fields of energy or sustainability; and management system experience (eg ISO 9001/14001/50001).

Those interested can find further information and apply for the position via LinkedIn HERE.

Published in Jobs

Engineers, historians, retired dockers and port workers gathered at Dublin Port for the launch of a new book last evening called “Dublin Port Chief Engineers”, published by Dublin Port Company and written by Dr Ronald Cox, Engineering Historian and Visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Civil, Structural & Environmental Engineering at Trinity College Dublin.

“Dublin Port Engineers” navigates the story of two of Dublin Port’s most pioneering port engineers in recent decades, Bindon Blood Stoney (1828-1909) and John Purser Griffith (1848-1938). This beautifully presented publication is the culmination of detailed research undertaken by Dr Cox over many years into the lives and illustrious work of both engineers and draws on a trove of maps, images, and information held in Dublin Port’s 300-year-old archive to tell their story.

Dublin Port Chairman Jerry Grant speaks at the launch of “Dublin Port Chief Engineers” at Dublin Port CentreDublin Port Chairman Jerry Grant speaks at the launch of “Dublin Port Chief Engineers” at Dublin Port Centre

Bindon Blood Stoney was Dublin Port Engineer from 1862 to 1899, and the modern city of Dublin along the River Liffey reflects his engineering prowess in the bridges and quay walls he built using his wonderful Diving Bell, better known today as Dublin’s smallest museum on Sir John Rogerson’s Quay.

Dr Ronald Cox speaking at the launch of his book “Dublin Port Chief Engineers” at Dublin Port CentreDr Ronald Cox speaking at the launch of his book “Dublin Port Chief Engineers” at Dublin Port Centre

When John Purser Griffith, who served as Bindon Blood Stoney’s assistant for 27 years before becoming his successor as Chief Port Engineer, took over he would go on to champion the city and the port, still a key strategic objective of the modern Dublin Port Company today.

From 1899 to 1909, John Purser Griffith helped to modernise Dublin Port, reconstructing the North and South quays, electrifying the cranes with the port’s own power station and reorganising dredging operations with a new modern suction dredger, The Sandpiper.

Dublin Port Heritage Director Lar Joye (left), Dr Ronald Cox (centre) and Dublin Port Chairman Jerry Grant (right) at the launch of “Dublin Port Chief Engineers” at Dublin Port Centre on Monday, June 26, 2023. “Dublin Port Engineers” navigates the story of two of Dublin Port’s most pioneering port engineers in recent decades, Bindon Blood Stoney (1828-1909) and John Purser Griffith (1848-1938).Dublin Port Heritage Director Lar Joye (left), Dr Ronald Cox (centre) and Dublin Port Chairman Jerry Grant (right) at the launch of “Dublin Port Chief Engineers” at Dublin Port Centre on Monday, June 26, 2023. “Dublin Port Engineers” navigates the story of two of Dublin Port’s most pioneering port engineers in recent decades, Bindon Blood Stoney (1828-1909) and John Purser Griffith (1848-1938)

Lar Joye, Port Heritage Director, Dublin Port Company, said:  “Our thanks and credit to Dr Ronald Cox whose meticulous research has resulted in such a wonderful addition to public understanding of Dublin Port and the City of Dublin. It’s amazing to think that in 1990, Dr Cox was commissioned by the then Dublin Port & Docks Board to compile a biographical sketch of Bindon Blood Stoney as one of the most illustrious engineers ever associated with Dublin Port’s history. Today, some 30 years later, we are continuing to learn about their transformative work, and we are privileged to have helped bring Dr Cox’s work to life with the addition of previously unseen photographs from the Dublin Port Archive. That in itself feels like history in the making.

The book “Dublin Port Chief Engineers” was launched at Dublin Port CentreThe book “Dublin Port Chief Engineers” was launched at Dublin Port Centre

“I wish to pay tribute to the late Gerald Daly (1928-1998), then Honorary Archivist to the Dublin Port & Docks Board. At that time, access to the letters and other archival material in the Board’s possession was undoubtedly made all the easier due to Gerry’s tireless efforts to secure such information, and I think it’s fair to say that no query went unanswered for long.
“I also want to mention the late Niall Dardis. When Gerry was retiring, he couldn’t think of anyone better suited to the stewardship of the Dublin Port archive than Niall, who was a former draughtsman before retiring in 1992. When Gerry approached Niall, he couldn’t say no and took on the role of Honorary Archivist with great enthusiasm and skill.”

Dr Ronald Cox (centre) with his wife Rosaleen and family Lisa and Jana at the launch of “Dublin Port Chief Engineers” at Dublin Port Centre on Monday, June 26, 2023. “Dublin Port Engineers” navigates the story of two of Dublin Port’s most pioneering port engineers in recent decades, Bindon Blood Stoney (1828-1909) and John Purser Griffith (1848-1938).Dr Ronald Cox (centre) with his wife Rosaleen and family Lisa and Jana at the launch of “Dublin Port Chief Engineers” at Dublin Port Centre 

Dr Cox is a Member of the Institution of Civil Engineers, a Fellow of the Institution of Engineers of Ireland, a Fellow of the Irish Academy of Engineering, and a Member of the American Society of Civil Engineers. Recent books include Ireland’s Bridges (2003), Engineering Ireland (2006), Ireland’s Civil Engineering Heritage (2013), Called to Serve (2013) and Called to Serve Two (2019).

“Dublin Port Chief Engineers” is available to purchase from Wordwell Books here.

Published in Dublin Port
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Dublin Port Company, today, 3rd May 2023, announced details of its Art and Engagement programme 22/23 at the Pumphouse, Alexandra Road.

The Pumphouse formerly housed the steam engine which powered the gates of Graving Dock 1 but has been repurposed by Dublin Port into an artistic and cultural venue and is a key part of the Heritage Zone at Dublin Port.

The theme for this year’s Dublin Port Art and Engagement programme is ‘Connections: The Port, the City, Arts and Education’. Dublin Port’s plans for the Heritage Zone at the Pumphouse include expanding its use for public exhibitions, events and performances creating a distinct and unique destination in the heart of the working port as part of port-city integration plans up to 2040.

Pictured was a short piece from “Back home to a wonderful time” by ANU productions at The Pumphouse located on Alexandra Rd, Dublin Port as part of Dublin Port Art and Engagement programme 2023 announcement. The theme for this year’s Dublin Port Art and Engagement programme is ‘Connections: The Port, the City, Arts and Education’. DPictured is a short piece from “Back home to a wonderful time” by ANU productions at The Pumphouse located on Alexandra Rd, Dublin Port as part of Dublin Port Art and Engagement programme 2023 announcement. The theme for this year’s Dublin Port Art and Engagement programme is ‘Connections: The Port, the City, Arts and Education’ Photo: Conor McCabe

The Art and Engagement programme has been underway since mid-2022. It includes completed art and design outputs, such as large-scale projections incorporating live and still imagery as well as workshops led by experienced artists with pupils from St. Laurence O’Toole Primary School and second-level art students from Ringsend College.

Under a comprehensive programme of future work established artists and students, will participate in short residencies, and performances, including theatre and music - designed and customised for the Pumphouse context. These have been developed in partnership with theatre companies, ANU and Fishamble, as well as with Students from the National College of Art & Design (NCAD), UCD’s School of Architecture, the Design and Material Culture Course at NCAD as well the Sean O’Casey Community Centre’s Art Group and teenage members of the East Wall Youth Centre.

Julie Crowe and Matthew Williamson performing a short piece from “Back home to a wonderful time” by ANU productions at The Pumphouse located on Alexandra Rd, Dublin Port Julie Crowe and Matthew Williamson performing a short piece from “Back home to a wonderful time” by ANU productions at The Pumphouse located on Alexandra Rd, Dublin Port

Highlights of the current programme include:

Artworks by Transition Students from Ringsend College and ‘Works in Progress’ Prints and Photographs by 5th Year Students (April 2023). A study group of Transition Year students from Ringsend College are engaged in a new round of workshops with artist Janine Davidson using a range of art media to explore Port - City themes.

‘Mappings of East Wall’, by the Sean O’Casey Community Centre Art Group and artist, Silvia Leoffler (May 2023). These small scale and intimate mappings by members of the Sean O’Casey Centre’s mature art group amount to a creative portrait of the streets, homes and people who constitute the local neighbourhood of East Wall.

NCAD STUDIO+ Programme (May 2023). The Pumphouse is being regularly used as a situated studio space as part of the National College of Art & Design’s STUDIO + programme during which a series of micro-residencies for specific student groups take place.

Temporary Pleasure (Summer 2023) a large-scale architectural installation and event space in the Pumphouse Plaza, to offer new perspectives and appreciations of the work and life of Dublin Port.

States of Independence’ by Smashing Times, International Centre for Arts and Equality (October 2023). Celebrating the stories of ten changemakers from the Decade of Centenaries, and stories of ten changemakers today, told through performances, visual arts, creative billboards and online exhibitions.

The Pumphouse has been developing dynamic theatre and music projects for several years. Previous works at The Pumphouse included ‘Hidden Pianos’ (2018) developed by Artistic Director Máire Carroll with the aim of sharing classical and contemporary music in site-specific locations, ‘The Pumphouse Presents’ (2020), a Winter Festival of Plays commissioned by Dublin Port Company featuring work from Axis Ballymun, ANU productions and Fishamble: The New Play Company, and ‘The Book of Names’ (2021), a hugely ambitious co-production by ANU Productions and Landmark, that plots a singular path through one of the most secretive, contentious, and turbulent times in Irish history.

Barry O’Connell, CEO Dublin Port said, “The use of the Pumphouse is part of Dublin Port’s long-term strategy of connecting Port and City. The ‘Connections’ event reflects the ongoing Port/City Integration process and will see other large-scale heritage and arts projects being developed as areas of the Port are opened for public use. We are excited about this development in the overall context of port development and are committed to ensuring that the Port develops as a thriving community resource.”

Edel Currie, Community Engagement Manager for Dublin Port added, “It has been very positive, over the last few years, to see the theatre and music events, creative residencies and learning workshops develop at the Pumphouse. The engagement with the local schools and Colleges on these artistic works has been enormously positive. The wider appeal of these projects demonstrates the potential for the Pumphouse as a heritage zone in the city Centre. We look forward to the visual arts and performing arts events scheduled over the summer months and into the Autumn of 2023.”

Declan McGonagle, curator of the Pumphouse programme, said, “The Pumphouse is a distinct and unique setting where creative practice meets public experience in the context of a working Port and communities of place interact with communities of interest from further afield. The visualisations and signage tell the story of the Pumphouse its transformation and contempoary use. These visualisations of past and present activities are presented within the Pumphouse, using large scale, immersive projected imagery, a large scale white screen projection and monitors, along with photo-enlarged panels of workshops, participants and artworks. The works have been produced by different participating groups and include interviews with relevant Port staff, artists and academia, workshop members and past Port workers.”

At the Pumphouse Plaza, ANU productions will perform a short piece from “Back home to a wonderful time” on about the last troop ship leaving Berth 18 in December of 1922 starring Julie Crowe (The Stewart Of Christendom, The Gate, 2022), Peter Rothweil (Staging the Treaty, ANU Productions, 2022) and Matthew Williamson (The Book of Names, ANU and Landmark Productions, 2021).

Published in Dublin Port
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The Lord Mayor of Dublin Caroline Conroy, today performed the annual ‘Casting of the Spear’ into Dublin Bay, one the most important symbolic occasions on the Dublin Port calendar. In the process, she confirmed her title as Honorary Admiral of Dublin Port, upholding the memory of a 535-year-old tale.

In 1488, Lord Mayor of Dublin Thomas Mayler rode on horseback out to the city’s boundaries, facing bitter rain and fierce winds. Braving these elements, Lord Mayor Mayler brandished a spear, which he vaulted out into the sea as he went. Each casting of his spear marked a point on Dublin’s eastward boundary, the distance of which into the Irish Sea was determined by the Lord Mayor’s aim and strength.

More than half a millennium later, the face of Dublin Port has changed considerably. Today, it carries nearly two-thirds of all port traffic on the island of Ireland. Beneath all this activity lie the marks of Thomas Mayler cast out when Ireland’s trading relationship with the rest of the world was still in relative infancy.

To commemorate this event, Lord Mayor of Dublin Caroline Conroy cast a spear of her own into Dublin Bay, her first official act as Honorary Admiral of the Port. Modern times have seen successive Lord Mayors take to the water at Dublin Port to earn their honorary title, which they retain for their period in office.

“It is my great pleasure to be confirmed as Honorary Admiral of the Port of Dublin,” Lord Mayor of Dublin Caroline Conroy said, “This ritual has fascinated me for several years. A connection to these colourful aspects of our past remains of great cultural value to all Dubliners. Dublin Port remains ever more vital to our commercial and cultural life in the city and beyond, and I wish it every success in its Masterplan projects over the coming years.”

Dublin Port CEO Barry O’Connell commented at the ceremony: “I would like to thank Lord Mayor Conroy for her participation in this ceremony and for her continued support of Dublin Port. This is a tradition I’m very proud to continue, one which emphasises the strong links between port and city and the importance of history and culture to our local community. It’s astounding to think, with all our advancements in engineering today, that the original boundary of the city was set by one person casting a spear into the sea. We’re currently in the process of developing a range of paths for cyclists and pedestrians running 5.5km across the Poolbeg Peninsula and 16km across the north side of the Liffey. These should allow Dubliners to look out over the full scope of this boundary set by a previous Lord Mayor over 500 years ago.”

Published in Dublin Port
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Dublin Port Company (DPC) has announced that P&O Ferries and Seatruck will move locations within Dublin Port from January 23rd 2023.

The move will see P&O Ferries relocate from existing Terminal 3 (East Wall Road) to Terminal 5 (T5), at the eastern end of the port, replacing Seatruck. Seatruck will relocate its operations from Terminal 5 to a new Terminal 4 (T4), at the western end of the port. The new T4 will be accessed via a new check-in facility on Tolka Quay Road.

This change sees the former Terminal 3 entrance along East Wall Road (opposite the 3Arena) close to HGVs from January 23rd. All HGV traffic for Seatruck (T4) will access the port via Promenade Road, then onto T4 via Tolka Quay Road, and cross over the new Alexandra Road Bridge (the Red Bridge).

All traffic to P&O Ferries (T5) will enter the port via Promenade Road and travel east on New Promenade Road before turning right on to Terminal Road and then left on Alexandra Road Extension. P&O Car Ferry traffic will access T5 via Terminal Road South. 

P&O Ferries is moving to Terminal 5P&O Ferries is moving to Terminal 5

To help all port users with the changeover, temporary digital signage will be in place along key routes within the port estate to direct drivers. The team from DPC will also be on the ground to assist drivers over the coming weeks.

The relocation of P&O Ferries and Seatruck facilitates ongoing development works associated with the Alexander Basin Redevelopment (ABR) Project, and the commencement of works on the MP2 Project; two major strategic infrastructure development projects consented and underway to increase port capacity as planned in DPC Masterplan 2040.

Seatruck is moving to Terminal 4Seatruck is moving to Terminal 4

DPC acknowledges the ongoing support of both P&O Ferries and Seatruck in preparation for the move on January 23rd and is committed to working with both terminal operators to ensure a smooth transition for their customers and all port users.

P&O Ferries and Seatruck will be advising customers of their final sailing times from their original locations, and the first sailing times from their new locations in due course.

Port users can continue to keep up to date on all road and traffic developments at Dublin Port via Twitter. This includes recent changes to the speed limits throughout the north port estate road network which limit speeds to 40Km/h in the port estate and 20Km/h within the terminals as part of Dublin SafePort.

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Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.