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Displaying items by tag: Inland Fisheries Ireland

A Co Galway dairy has been fined €1,000 following a successful prosecution for river pollution by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI).

At a sitting of Ballinasloe District Court on Thursday 1 October, it was heard that on 24 October 2019, IFI staff noticed a discharge of polluting matter entering the Deerpark River from Arrabawn Dairies, Kilconnell, Co Galway.

Results from samples showed higher-than-recommended levels for a number of parameters, including biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), ammonia and suspended solids.

Judge Gearty convicted Arrabawn Dairies under Section 171 of the Fisheries Acts and Section 4 of the Local Government (Water Pollution) Acts.

Fisheries Assistant Inspector Arnold Donnelly gave evidence emphasising the polluting nature of the discharge and that it was particularly unfortunate that the discharge occurred at a time of year when fish spawn in the river.

Judge Gearty fined the company €1,000 and awarded costs of €2,659 to IFI.

David Mc Inerney, director of the Shannon River Basin District at IFI, said: “Pollution events such as this have a very negative impact on water quality which is essential for the health of fish.

“The Deerpark River system is a tributary of the River Suck and holds excellent stocks of wild brown trout, crayfish and brook lamprey. Protection of water quality and habitats is critical to our rivers and fisheries ecosystems.”

Published in Angling

Since 2016, Inland Fisheries Ireland has awarded more than €4 million to over 200 sustainable angling projects across the country.

Now more eligible community groups and angling clubs can apply for the latest round of grant funding available to sustainable fisheries conservation and development projects, with over €1 million announced today (Friday 27 November).

Expressions of interest have been sought under two schemes funded by angler contributions: the €50,000 Midlands Fisheries Funds, which focuses on sustainable works in the midland fisheries permit area; and the €1 million Salmon and Sea Trout Rehabilitation, Conservation and Protection Fund.

To be eligible, applicants must have contributed to the relevant fund through the purchasing of a midland fisheries permit or a salmon and sea trout licence, whether for angling or commercial purposes.

Expressions of interest (that will progress to full applications) will be accepted from this Monday 30 November, and applications and must be submitted before 5.30pm on Thursday 28 January. Decisions on applications and grants will be announced in May next year.

Further information on the grant schemes available and how to apply is available from the IFI website.

Published in Angling

A Co Cork dairy farmer has been fined €8,000 at Midleton District Court following a prosecution taken by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI).

On Thursday 12 November, Brian Duncan pleaded guilty before Judge Patricia Harney to polluting the Douglas River at Garryduff, Dungourney, Co Cork in April 2018.

The court heard that an initial discharge of slurry from his farmyard was followed by further reoccurrences, resulting in a number of court adjournments and hearings to allow completion of court-directed remedial works.

IFI gave evidence that the river had been severely polluted by the slurry discharges, which had rendered the riverine habitat inaccessible to spawning trout and salmon.

Evidence was also given that Duncan was running a large farm with a dairy herd in excess of 1,000 and that he had invested significantly in improving his yard facilities since the initial incident.

Judge Harney convicted Duncan under Section 171 (1) of the Fisheries Consolidation Act 1959 and Section 3 (1) of The Local Government Water Pollution Act 1977, awarding full costs and expenses of €8,139 to IFI.

While noting the remedial works, Sean Long, director of the South Western River Basin District, said: “Livestock manure and other organic fertilisers, effluents and soiled water have the potential to cause devastating effects on our fisheries resource.

“Good farmyard management and using preventative measures helps stop accidental discharges of polluting substances and protects the local environment, which will have a significant and lasting positive impact on valuable wild fish populations and general wellbeing in an area.

“I urge the farming community to remain vigilant to the risk of pollution from yards and slurry tanks. Inland Fisheries Ireland has a confidential hotline number to enable members of the general public to report incidents of water pollution, fish kills and illegal fishing – 1890 34 74 24 or 1890 FISH 24.’”

To prevent waters from being polluted by nitrogen and phosphorus when land-spreading, IFI advises farmers to refer to Good Agricultural Practice Regulations guidance on www.agriculture.gov.ie

Published in Angling

A newly published research paper co-authored by experts in Ireland highlights the importance of ferox trout to the fisheries of Lough Corrib and Lough Mask.

Ferox trout are highly prized by trophy anglers, and Loughs Corrib and Mask have recorded the majority of Irish specimens since angling records began in the 1950s.

The large, long-lived, fish-eating trout are normally found in deep lakes and are believed to be genetically distinct from normal brown trout, having evolved after the last Ice Age 12,000 years ago.

Little was known about the spawning location of Irish ferox trout compared to normal brown trout, and a radio tracking study was initiated in both catchments in 2005.

Local anglers and Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) staff helped catch large ferox trout on both lakes in order to insert radio tags.

The fish were released after tagging and then tracked with help from the Irish Air Corps helicopter unit and by walking spawning streams with a radio tracking antenna to determine in which streams ferox spawned.

Scientists from Inland Fisheries Ireland worked with colleagues at the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research on the data collected in this study.

Results from radio tracking showed that the majority (92%) of ferox trout tagged in Lough Corrib spawned in a single spawning stream, the Cong River, while the majority (76%) of ferox trout tagged in Lough Mask spawned in the Cong canal and Cong River.

These results, as published in the Journal of Fish Biology, indicate that these streams are most likely the principle spawning locations of ferox trout in both lakes.

Dr Paddy Gargan, senior research officer at Inland Fisheries Ireland and lead author on the publication, said: “The occurrence of ferox trout predominantly in single spawning rivers in both catchments highlights the vulnerability of the ferox populations with estimates of their population size thought to be small”.

IFI’s head of research Dr Cathal Gallagher welcomed the findings and said: “It was important that conservation measures, based on this research, have been introduced in the Corrib and Mask catchments continue to protect ferox trout.

“These conservation measures have reduced the number of ferox trout being killed and claimed as specimens and support the conservation of this unique trout.”

Published in Marine Science

A West Cork fisherman has been fined €4,000 plus costs after being found guilty on two counts of illegal fishing and the obstruction of Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) officers.

Evidence in relation to the offences by Donal Healy — with an address in Castletownbere, Co Cork — was given before Judge James McNulty sitting at Bantry District Court on Wednesday 28 October.

The breaches of fisheries legislation occurred on 5 July 2019 off Quarry Point in Co Cork.

IFI officers outlined the facts of the case to the court and how Healy had been observed drift-net fishing with a monofilament net off Quarry Point.

Healy attempted to prevent fisheries officers from boarding his vessel on its return to Blackball Harbour by casting off and pulling away from the pier. But IFI officers managed to board the vessel at sea and seized the illegal 300-metre-long salmon drift net.

Judge McNulty imposed fines of €2,000 for illegal fishing and €2,000 for obstructing the fisheries officers, and Healy was ordered to pay a further €500 in costs to IFI.

Sean Long, director of the South Western River Basin District, said: “I would like to commend the fisheries protection officers’ vigilance, perseverance and continuous commitment to protecting migrating salmon on their journey back to their spawning grounds. Mr Healy’s selfish actions put into jeopardy the very survival of a protected species in Irish rivers.

“This conviction highlights the ongoing issue of illegal netting for salmon and our zero tolerance of this serious environmental crime.

“I urge members of the public to continue to report instances of illegal fishing, water pollution and invasive species by calling Inland Fisheries Ireland’s confidential hotline number on 1890 34 74 24 or 1890 FISH 24.”

Published in Fishing

A total of 35 projects engaged with introducing novices to angling have been granted funding this year to the tune of €140,000.

Applications for the ‘Angling for All’ fund were welcomed by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) from any group in Ireland engaged in encouraging novice anglers, for projects that support governance, education and safety in angling.

Four national projects are receiving funding, along with 31 regional projects including those by the National Coarse Fishing Federation of Ireland (NCFFI), Angling Council of Ireland (ACI), Salmon and Sea Trout Recreational Anglers of Ireland (SSTRAI) and Irish Federation of Pike Angling Clubs (IFPAC).

“The ‘Angling for All’ fund has been oversubscribed, reflecting the interest there is in angling countrywide,” said IFI’s head of business development Suzanne Campion.

“This financial investment of €140,000 will support the angling community directly to help make angling an accessible sport to novice angler of all backgrounds and abilities.

“The fund seeks to break down proven barriers to entering the sport and aims to improve governance, education and safety within angling stakeholder organisations.”

The full list of projects and initiatives receiving funding supported by the Dormant Accounts Fund can be found below:

Organisation Location Project Title Offer amount (€)
Connaught Angling Council Mayo  Angling development 4759.46
Angling Council Ireland (ACI) Nationwide Child Safety, Coaching & Governance The Angling Council of Ireland #whatwedobest 5000
Cornamona and District Anglers Association Galway Inclusive Angling 3300
Weston Anglers Limerick Help the kids and keep the art of fishing alive 4500
Maigue Rivers Trust Limerick Fly Fishing on the Maigue 4867.7
James's Street CBS Dublin Transition Year Fishing Project 4600
Inniscarra Fishing Cork Fishing for All on Inniscarra 5000
Tullamore and District Angling Club Offaly Junior Anglers 2021 2400
SSTRAI Rathcormac Angling Group Cork Rathcormac Angling Hub Cast Programme fly tying for Rathcormac Scout Group 2000
Salmon & Sea Trout Recreational Anglers Ireland Nationwide SSTRAI New Starter Hubs 2021 (equipment) 5000
Macroom Trout Angling club Cork West Muskerry Angling Club 3270
Lough Ree Lanesborough Angling Hub Longford Access and coaching for youth and disabled 5000
St John Bosco Youth Centre Dublin Bosco Fishing Initiative 2100
Youth Action Castlebar Mayo Youth Action Castlebar 2200
Youth Action Ballina Mayo Youth Fishing Initiative 3300
Bannow Bay Sea Angling Club Wexford Shore Fishing for all. 4500
Mountmellick Angling Club Laois Mountmellick Angling for all 4895
Fermoy river youth And amenity group Cork Training for youth and vulnerable adults 4810
Waterford and District Coarse angling club Waterford WDCAC coaching program 4900
St. Pauls youth fishing club Waterford Waterford city youth outreach 4850
Lough Ree Access For All CLG Roscommon Lough Ree Access For All Angling Safaris 5000
Oaklands Coarse Angling club Wexford Oaklands Angling Camps 4900
Deele Community Anglers Donegal Wefish Nature Educates. 4800
Foroige Connect Mayo Foroige Connect 2200
FORUM Connemara Clg Galway Angling for young people with disability 2500
SSTRAI Glanmire & District Salmon & Trout Anglers Association Cork Tibbotstown Reservoir Fishery 3500
Killinarden Angling Initiative Dublin Angling in Dublin Vlog 4000
Irish Federation of Pike Angling Clubs Dublin All Ireland Junior Angling Championships and Novice Angler Coaching 5000
National Coarse Fishing Federation of Ireland Nationwide On-Line Governmence Support for Clubs 4500
Maugherow Sea Angling Club Sligo Establishment of New Sea Angling Club in North Sligo (Maugherow Sea Angling Club) 4000
Silver Anglers Kilcormac Offaly Silver Anglers Future Fishing Development Project 4250
Munster Provisional Council of the Irish Federation of Sea Anglers Cork Munster Juvenile Boat Angling 4992
Inagh River Catchment Management Association Clare Inagh River Youth Angling Initiative 3140
Mullingar Tidy Towns Westmeath Fishing for all Mullingar 3830
Coomhola National School Cork Angling: A Sense of Place 2300
Published in Angling

Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) says it welcomes the Environmental Protection Agency’s new report on urban waste water treatment in 2019.

Published this week, the EPA’s report criticises Irish Water over failure to meet pollution prevention standards at treatment facilities for 19 large towns and cities around Ireland.

Commenting on the report, IFI’s head of operations Dr Greg Forde said: “Continuing untreated discharges to waters around Ireland pose an unacceptable risk to the environment and public health.

“These untreated discharges are preventing the recovery of the biodiversity and ecology of significant rivers, estuaries and also where discharges go direct to the sea.

“It is unacceptable that many rivers are failing to recover due to persistent untreated discharges or overflow discharges where the capacity of treatment plants is inadequate to address growing populations.”

Dr Forde added that IFI is also concerned about the 35 predominantly coastal towns and villages without proper facilities for the treatment of sewage.

“It is not until 2022 that a significant number of these plants will come online,” he said.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, IFI has launched updated guidelines on ‘Planning for Watercourses in the Urban Environment’ which outline an integrated watercourse protection strategy.

Published in Coastal Notes

Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) has launched an update of its guideline document ‘Planning for Watercourses in the Urban Environment’.

It outlines an integrated watercourse protection strategy that has been developed by IFI through consultation with a wide range of experts in the area.

Watercourses including rivers, lakes and streams are an integral part of our environment — and if managed appropriately can significantly improve the quality of life for people living in urban areas, IFI says.

The strategy adopts a ‘four-step’ approach to watercourse protection planning which should not only protect watercourses and their associated riverside zones in urban areas, but also provide other benefits important for the wellbeing of people living nearby.

Watercourses cover 

IFI chief executive Francis O’Donnell emphasises that both “nature-based catchment management” and “a holistic approach to addressing our biodiversity and climate challenges” are crucial for sustainable development going forward.

These updated guidelines approach the issue of planning for watercourses in urban environments from a multi-stakeholder perspective and seek to maximise the significant co-benefits that will arise from adoption of a comprehensive, all-inclusive strategy,” he says.

“These benefits range from better water quality and more resilient and natural ecosystems to the well-established positive effects of nature and green areas for community wellbeing, recreation, health and recovery from serious illness and even reduced levels of antisocial behaviour.

“We hope these guidelines will be a useful resource for all of Irish society.”

Published in Inland Waterways

Improving stocks of wild salmon and trout in the West of Ireland in the goal of a new initiative launched by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI).

Derek Evans writes in The Irish Times about IFI’s partnership with Co Galway angling federation Cairde an Chláir to restore a near kilometre-long stretch of the Abbert River, a tributary of the River Clare.

Earlier this year the two groups signed a memorandum of understanding on the conservation and development of brown trout and salmon and their habitat, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

While the coronavirus pandemic slowed progress over the year, IFI says the project is now at the stage where work on the river can begin — while a similar scheme to restore 8km of nursery streams such as the River Nanny is already under way.

The Irish Times has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling

Inland Fisheries Ireland’s (IFI) education and outreach team have been working with Foróige to get young people angling with the Go Fishing programme.

Due to the latest public health-related restrictions on gatherings, the programme has now evolved into a “blended learning experience” that consists of a weekly online course over four weeks, followed by a local fishing trip.

Participants learn about Ireland’s inland fisheries and the benefits of angling, the biodiversity of our waterways, becoming a steward of our waterways and the environment, and the basics of angling.

IFI says the programme has been piloted with a number of Foróige groups nationwide since July. One of these was in Donegal, where a local Foróige group was taken shore fishing at Buncrana beach on Thursday 27 August.

The young participants learned how to set up a beach casting rod, attach a rig using the improved clinch knot, how to bait up using mackerel, razorfish, lug worm and use bait elastic.

The weather was reportedly “perfect for fishing” and the young anglers caught a number of dogfish. They went home at the end of the day with goodie bags and certificates of awareness having completed their course.

Foróige youth worker Orla Taylor says the IFI sessions were presented “in an engaging and well organised way, telling stories of catches and experiences they have had. This made it very real for the young people.

“The group loved the experience and are looking forward to trying more fishing.”

The online programme is designed for young people aged 12–17. Group numbers for the fishing trip are always in line with the prevailing public health advice, but up to 20 can partake in the online course.

With consideration of the current situation, all fishing field trips will now take place in 2021.

Lorraine O’Donnell, education and outreach officer at IFI, says: “We are delighted to now be able to offer an online course as part of the Go Fishing initiative.

“Being able to offer the course in an online capacity keeps the programme accessible at the current time and also means we are able to offer the programme to organisations like Foróige.

“We would like to invite any youth groups that would be interested in taking part in the new online course to please email [email protected] for more information.”

Published in Angling
Page 1 of 26

Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.

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