Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Newbuild

A new bulk oriented general cargoship for Arklow Shipping took to the water for the first time yesterday as the fifth of six ships was launched by shipbuilder Ferus Smit, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 8,543dwt newbuild (NB.441) bulker was christened in The Netherlands as Arklow Arrow and launched onto the Ems Canal, however due to Covid-19 restrictions the inland shipyard was not open to public.

Ferus Smit is a German shipbuilder that has a second yard located in Westerbroek from where the Arklow A- series 'Arrow' became the first ship to use this name in the ASL fleet.

Arklow Arrow's design is a slightly modified version of the first series of 8,600dwt bulkers of the Arklow B-series also completed by Ferus Smit.

The new design also has an adapted ice class 1A along with a modified bow form and propulsion with a propeller nozzle added. As for the main engine, output has been decreased to 2000kW so to enbable better fuel efficiency.

Following sea trials that will take place in the North Sea, see Arklow Archer' canal transit (following launch in June) the Arrow will join the other A-series ships; Ace, Accord and Abbey which was delivered last year as the leadship.

Likewise of this series the new cargoship is registered at its shipowners Co. Wicklow homeport and will fly the Irish tricolor.

Total hold capacity is 350.000cft and this will see Arklow Arrow be mainly employed in the shipment of corn, wheat and other bulk commodities in European waters.

Published in Ports & Shipping

The intention to purchase a new Multi Role Vessel (MRV) for the Naval Service has been confirmed by the Department of Defence.

This could see the vessel be used as a hospital ship and capable of carrying troops and helicopters for amphibious in addition airborne landings.

A spokeswoman for the department said planning is "underway on this project".

It is envisaged that the MRV (as Afloat reported in 2018) will replace the ageing LÉ Eithne as the Naval Service flagship, and could cost up to €200m.

The new ship is likely to be designed to allow it the capability to carry out numerous different types of missions, not just sea fishery patrols.

Military sources have indicated that it could be used to provide humanitarian aid in times of emergency in Ireland and in other countries where conflicts or climate disaster threaten civilian populations.

It could also be used by gardaí, customs, or the coastguard, where required.

The MRV project is being managed by a civil-military project team and work is ongoing on preparing detailed specification requirements for the ship.

For further reading the Irish Examiner reports.

Published in Navy

Ferry operator Aran Island Ferries has announced it’s on track to make history this summer – by commissioning Ireland’s largest domestic ferry.

The boat, reports GalwayBayFM, will be a 40 metre vessel with space for 400 passengers, which represents a significant boost in capacity over it’s current largest boats, Music of the Sea and Magic of the Sea.

The new vessel will be the sixth boat in the Aran Island Ferries fleet – though full details or a name for the vessel have yet to be revealed.

Afloat.ie adds as for the names of the larger ferries this is in fact their English translation. The names of these vessels are in Irish, Ceol na Farraige (built 2001) and Draíocht na Farraige (1999) respectively.

Each of the 37m Wavemaster monohull craft can carry 294 passengers. 

Published in Ferry

The fourth and final 'W' series of newbuilds for Arklow Shipping was launched earlier this month, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Arklow Wood was successfully launched at the Ferus Smit's shipyard in Leer, Germany.

As Afloat reported a previous sister Arklow Willow was launched last year though the 'Wind' is the first to be used in the owners naming scheme for this series.

The Arklow Wood took to the waters on 3rd April and will fly the Irish flag. As for design the cargoship is an enlarged version of the 8500dwt ships that the shipyard delivered to Arklow Shipping in the past.  The cargoship in comparison with these predecessors has almost twice the carrying capacity of 16,500dwt.

As for propulsion the newbuild is equipped with a 3840kW main engine in order to achieve low fuel consumption.

The design features:
– Main dimensions (Loa X B X T) 149.50 X 19.25 X 8.59 mtr.
– 16500 DWT, 700.000 cft hold volume.
– Iceclass 1A with 3840kW main engine.
– 2 box shaped holds.
– Propeller equipped with a duct for enhanced thrust at lower speeds and reduction of maximum installed propulsion power.

A previous 'W' series of a different design and all since disposed had been the first newbuilds for ASL to be ordered from a shipyard outside Europe, having been built in South Korea. This series however only totalled a trio and all using the same ship names now applied to the new series comprising of leadship Arklow Wave, Wind and Willow.

Another recent newbuild, Arklow Ace launched last month and belonging to the 'A'  series was also built by the same German group but at their Ferus Smit yard at Westerbroek, The Netherlands. The newbuild has recently left the inland yard under the Irish flag. 

The fleet of ASL including its Dutch division totals almost 60 dry-cargo vessels among them deep-sea bulk-carriers. 

Published in Ports & Shipping

The latest and third newbuild of the Arklow 'A' class series which is a bulk orientated general cargoship was launched at a Dutch yard, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Arklow Ace (Nb.439) took to the water for the first time as the third of six such ships so far from the Ferus Smit yard at Westerbroek on Friday.

Arklow Ace was christened for owners Arklow Shipping and at the stern the Co. Wicklow town is given as the port of registry. When the newbuild enters service this Irish flagged vessel will expand the fleet to 57 dry-cargo ships including 17 that are Dutch flagged.

Not only is Arklow Ace a new ship but is a first for ASL having this particular 'A' name suffix along with the previously completed sister, Arklow Accord (launched in November). The first of the series, leadship Arklow Abbey (in July) is an exception as the same name was previously used in a vessel dating to 1981 and sold in 1996.

The design of the A series is a slightly modified version of the first series of the 8600dwt bulkers that Ferus Smit built under the name of the Arklow B series.

A modified bow form and hull is adapted for Iceclass 1A conditions. As for propulsion this sees a propeller nozzle added while the main engine output was decreased to 2000 kW for better fuel efficiency.

This ship has the following characteristics:
– Loa = 119.495 mtr
– Lpp = 116.895 mtr
– B = 14.99 mtr
– D = 9.70 mtr
– T max = 7.160 mtr
– Hold volume = 350.000 cft

When Arklow Ace is delivered into service, the newbuild will be primary employed in typical shipments such as wheat, corn and other bulk commodities throughout European waters.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Arklow Accord is the latest of a new series for ship-owner Arklow Shipping Ltd, however the bulk oriented cargo vessel is also a first for the company to use this ship name, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The launching of newbuild Arklow Accord (Nb. 438) which took place on Friday, represents the second of a six ships using the Arklow 'A' naming scheme. The order by ASL is with shipbuilder Ferus Smit at their Dutch shipyard located in Westerbroek. 

Currently the company have almost 60 vessels including Dutch division Arklow Shipping Nederland B.V. and this milestone is to be exceeded with the roll-out of the Arklow A - series. 

The design of Arklow Accord will see its operations chiefly employed in the shipment of corn, wheat and other bulk commodities in European waters.

The inland yard at Westerbroek, is where Irish flagged leadship Arklow Abbey was also given the customary launched sideways in July and with the newbuild entering service two months later.

According to Ferus Smit, the design is a slightly modified version of the first series of 8600dwt bulkers that the shipyard built under the Arklow B – series. The new design is adapted for iceclass 1A, with modified bow form and propulsion with a propeller nozzle added.

At the same time, the main engine output was decreased to 2000 kW for better fuel efficiency.

Listed below are the basic characteristics of Arklow Accord:
– Loa = 119.495 mtr
– Lpp = 116.895 mtr
– B = 14.99 mtr
– D = 9.70 mtr
– T max = 7.160 mtr
– Hold volume = 350.000 cft

The delivery of the Arklow registered newbuild is due for January 2020.

Published in Ports & Shipping

To those in Cork City this weekend and travelling down J.J. Horgan's Quay may have noticed a sleek new naval arrival making its way upriver to the quay.

According to CorkBeo, the shiny arrival is a new French Naval ship, Rhône. It was only launched this year, so get down to see this while you can!

The newbuild is a support vessel of the French Navy which entered service this year and as Afloat reported in the summer Rhône made a first visit to Ireland. On that occasion it was to the Port of Waterford.

For more on this current call to Cork, click here, before the naval visitor departs the city on Monday morning.

Published in Naval Visits

Scot Explorer became the latest launch for a UK shipping forests products operator, following a christening ceremony that was held at a Dutch shipyard yesterday, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The launch (footage) of newbuild (NB 747) at the Royal Bodewes yard in Hoogezand marked the second of a three-ship order confirmed from Scotline which has its headquarters based in Romford, Kent.

Unlike leadship Scot Carrier launched last year, the latest newbuild of the trio of 4,800dwt sisters, differs having enclosed bridge wings, in order to make manoeuvring easier. The newbuild is due to be completed next month.

As for the final timber products carrier, this newbuild to be named Scot Ranger is scheduled to be delivered at the end of 2020.

Scotline primarily runs liner services throughout northern Europe with regular routes between Sweden, Ireland, Denmark, Germany, Norway and the Baltic States. In addition to those serving the UK, Netherlands and France.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Irish Lights counterpart serving the waters of England, Wales and the Channel Islands, Trinity House has launched a Vessel Replacement Project to commission the design and build of a vessel to replace THV Patricia. The vessel was delivered in 1982 and is reaching the end of its operational life.

The announcement was made at a launch event at Trinity House in London yesterday, during London International Shipping Week (LISW19). Attending the event was Maritime Minister Nusrat Ghani and where a contract notice was issued to the shipbuilding industry to open the procurement process.

The Minister announced her support for the project in July 2019, following a comprehensive Fleet Review that concluded that the three General Lighthouse Authorities of the UK and Ireland (Trinity House, Northern Lighthouse Board and Irish Lights) require seven vessels to deliver their critical aids to navigation service.

The new vessel will look to harness technological and environmental innovation to ensure that Trinity House continues to provide over 600 critical aids to navigation—such as lighthouses and buoys—for ships and seafarers in some of the most dangerous waters in the world, guiding them into safe channels away from hazards and wrecks.

Nusrat Ghani, Maritime Minister, said: “95% of our imports and exports are transported to and from the UK by sea and, with our waters becoming even busier, dealing with incidents quickly and efficiently is more important than ever. This new ship will support the General Lighthouse Authority to help future-proof their fleet and continue to support maritime trade for generations to come.”

Captain Ian McNaught, Executive Chairman of Trinity House, said: “We were pleased to hear that the Maritime Minister was content for us to move the Vessel Replacement Project closer towards the design and build phase. While we must ensure that value for money is central to the design, we will also be looking for new, tested and robust technologies in the vessel design; these technologies will need to offer high performance and resilience and also reduce our environmental impact.”

Published in Lighthouses

A French Navy offshore support and assistance vessel which was commissioned into service earlier this year visited Waterford City over the weekend, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The impressive Loire class or Metropolitan Support and Assistance Building (BSAM) Rhône entered service in January. This call to the 'Crystal City' was a maiden first to Ireland as the 70m newbuild berthed on the Suir at the Frank Cassin Wharf.

This part of the port on the Co. Kilkenny side was where Bell Lines lo-lo terminal was located before shifting downriver to Belview, the current main terminal of the Port of Waterford.

BSAM Rhône entered service in January as the second of pair following leadship BSAM Loire that form part of the unarmed support ships serving the French Navy. The newbuild built in Brittany at the Piriou shipyards of Concarneau was developed in a programme named the Kership. The joint venture was created in 2013 by Piriou (55%) and DCNS (45%).

The newbuild which has a displacement of 2960 tons has a propulsion system derived from two diesel engines that delivers a speed of 14 knots. A crew consists of 17 sailors in addition to an option for 12 divers.

This morning the naval visitor is scheduled to depart the Suir. 

Published in Naval Visits
Page 1 of 2

Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating