Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Shannon Erne Waterway

Waterways Ireland has advised masters of all craft that emergency channel maintenance operations are taking place on the Shannon-Erne Waterway between Lock 1 at Corraquill and Aghalane Bridge.

The works commenced yesterday, Thursday 7 July, and are expected to continue for two weeks, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

During this operation, mechanical plant will be working onboard a floating pontoon moored in the channel. The navigable channel will remain open and masters should proceed past the works with caution.

Masters and other users are asked to comply with safety signage and heed all instructions from safety personnel who will be in the area.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels and users on the Shannon-Erne Waterway that the pump-out facility at Belturbet in Co Cavan is temporarily out of order.

This is due to a loss of power associated with the construction of the new service block being undertaken by Cavan County Council.

It’s expected that the electrical connection will be re-established in early June, in accordance with the builder’s latest programme of works.

In the intervening period, alternative boat pump-out facilities are available on the waterways at Aghalane, Galloon and Knockninny.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland reminds masters of vessels on the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway that the winter mooring period for these inland waterways ended last Thursday 31 March.

Shannon Navigation Bye-Law No 17(3) now applies, such that vessels should not berth in the same harbour for longer than the statutory period of five consecutive days nor more than a total of seven days in any one month.

Published in Inland Waterways

The 5.5km Ballyconnell-to-Bellaheady Recreational Trail, a partnership venture between Cavan County Council and Waterways Ireland, was officially opened last Friday (25 March).

On hand for the launch were Minister for Rural and Community Development, Heather Humphreys with Cathaoirleach of Cavan County Council, Cllr Clifford Kelly and Waterways Ireland chief executive John McDonagh, among others.

The new 5.5km trail along the banks of the Woodford River on the Shannon-Erne Waterway also provides connectivity to the existing Woodford Village Walk, a key amenity in the UNESCO Cuilcagh Lakelands Geopark.

The project, which will ultimately form part of a broader 54km greenway along the old Cavan-to-Leitrim railway line, received €684,289 in funding from the Department of Rural and Community Development under the Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme.

Additional match funding was provided by Cavan County Council and Waterways Ireland.

Welcoming the opening of the new trail, Cllr Kelly said: “This trail is a wonderful addition to our local tourism product and enhances one of our greatest resources – our stunning natural landscape and our abundant waterways.

“Every 1,000 tourists that visit Cavan help support 14 jobs. The tourism and hospitality sector employs some 3,200 people in Co Cavan and projects such as this will contribute greatly to the recovery and future growth of the sector in the coming months and years”.

In addition to today’s opening, Cavan County Council’s Paddy Connaughton noted that work has recently completed on a second recreational trail along this route: a 6km trail from Belturbet to Corraquil, which was also funded through the Outdoor Recreation Infrastructure Scheme to the value of €500,000.

For more information on the Shannon-Erne Blueway, visit bluewaysireland.org. For more on things to do and places to stay in Co Cavan, visit thisiscavan.ie.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels of issues affecting navigation on the Shannon-Erne Waterway this week.

Following Storm Franklin, the Woodford River was completely blocked to navigation by two partially submerged fallen trees immediately upstream of Old Aghalane Bridge.

In addition, there are high-water levels in all areas of the waterway. Masters should consult with the water patrollers prior to undertaking a passage.

The by-pass current across the navigation on the lower side of Lock 15 is strong and could affect low powered vessels.

Air draft under bridges has been reduced as a result of the high-water levels and masters of craft are advised to navigate with additional caution in the vicinity of bridges.

Elsewhere, users of the Royal Canal towpath in the Maynooth area are advised that the section from Lock 13 at Deey Bridge to Pike Bridge east of Maynooth has been closed due to flooding from a blocked culvert.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it is working with Kildare County Council to resolve the issue as soon as possible and apologises to users for any inconvenience this may cause.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of all craft on the Shannon-Erne Waterway that there is a fallen tree obstructing the navigation arch on the bridge at Foalies Cut, which connects Upper Lough Erne with the River Erne between Belturbet in Co Cavan and Crom in Co Fermanagh.

Masters are requested to follow an alternative route at this time as the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways works to clear the obstruction this week from Monday 7 February.

Published in Inland Waterways

All 16 locks on the Shannon-Erne Waterway will be out of service from today, Friday 24 December to Monday 3 January inclusive.

No lock passage by boat will be possible during this period. Normal service will resume at 9am on Tuesday 4 January.

Waterways Ireland adds that the service blocks at Aghalane and Haughton's Shore are closed until Monday 14 March. The service blocks at Ballyconnell, Ballinamore, Keshcarrigan and Leitrim shall remain open.

All associated land-based and water-based Blueway trails shall remain open, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways confirms.

In other updates: on the Erne System, Bellanaleck slipway is closed until further notice, while on the Shannon Navigation, Clarendon Lock in Co Roscommon will reopen to navigation on Tuesday 4 January following works in preparation for lock gate replacement, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and users of the Shannon-Erne Waterway that tree trimming and hedge cutting will continue at various locations over the winter period.

During these operations until February 2022, mechanical plant will operate on floating pontoons on the water as well as along the banks of the inland waterway.

Masters of vessels will be advised by Waterways Ireland staff when making a passage, and their cooperation is requested at this time.

Elsewhere, on the Shannon Navigation, Waterways Ireland advises that Cleighran More jetty on Lough Allen is closed until further notice due to damage sustained in Storm Barra this week.

Published in Inland Waterways

Boat removals from Ireland’s canals jumped in 2020 — with the total for the year at 150% of the previous four years combined.

The figures were revealed by Minister of State for Heritage, Malcolm Noonan in his response to a Dáil question from Dun Laoghaire TD Cormac Devlin requesting a breakdown of the number of boats removed from rivers, canals and inland waterways between 2016 and 2020.

Across the canals network (and excluding the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway) under the jurisdiction of Waterways Ireland, a total of 45 boats deemed to be in breach of bye-laws were removed in 2020.

This compares to just seven the previous year, 17 in 2018, none in 2017 and seven in 2016 — a total of 31 in the four years leading to 2020.

On the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway, the figures over the last three years were more consistent, with 17 removals in 2020, 12 in 2019 and 15 in 2018. There were no removals on these waterways in 2017 or 2016.

Minister Noonan noted that the rise in removals on the canals last year can be credited to a compliance programme initiated by Waterways Ireland “to remove abandoned, sunken and non-compliant boats, vessels and structures from the canals network”.

He added: “This programme by the agency has resulted in improved water quality, improved compliance, and removed many unsightly boats, vessels and structures from the waterways.”

The Canals Bye Laws 1988 and the Shannon Navigation Bye Laws 1992 provide Waterways Ireland with the powers to remove boats, vessels and other structures that are in breach of the bye-laws.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, a number of live-aboard barge owners on the Grand Canal feared losing their homes under last year’s removal drive.

But they were spared at the 11th hour when Minister Noonan stepped in to promise engagement with Waterways Ireland on a long-term solution.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels that the winter mooring period for public harbours on the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway will commence on Monday 1 November and will end on 31 March 2022.

Masters wishing to avail of winter mooring on these inland waterways are required to pay the €63.50 fee prior to 1 November. Online registration must be made on the Waterways Ireland website HERE.

To apply, the following steps are involved:

  1. Apply online for Winter Mooring at a specific harbour.
  2. Receive email approval/rejection/alternative location of application.
  3. Follow link on approval email when received to pay winter mooring fee online.

Masters are reminded that Bye-law 17 — the “five consecutive days/seven days in one month” rule — continues to apply for masters not availing of winter mooring.

Waterways Ireland says it will be disconnecting its electricity supply points and water supply at public moorings for the winter period. Both services will be reinstated prior to the commencement of the 2022 boating season.

Masters are also reminded that vessels are moored in public harbours at the owner’s risk at all times and may be directed to other harbours as required.

Published in Inland Waterways
Page 1 of 4

Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2022

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating