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Displaying items by tag: Storm

#Weather - Met Éireann has issued a weather warning for tonight (Saturday 22 December) with winds expected to reach up to 110km an hour.

Tonight and tomorrow morning, south-west to west winds are likely to increase in most parts of the country, with mean speeds and gusts that "have the potential to be damaging".

The Irish weather service also reports strong gales on all Irish coastal waters and on the Irish Sea, with winds expected to reach storm force later on coasts from Valentia to Erris Head to Fair Head.

Published in Weather

#STORMS – May Day and the first day of Summer 2012 today brings little in the way of joy for boaters on the east coast of Ireland at least who have suffered early season set backs from gales since the beginning of April. Prolonged storm force winds and big seas have wrecked boats, equipment, jetties and piers along the coast.

Many yachts and boats are now safely sheltered in the capital's marinas at Dun Laoghaire, Malahide and Howth but sadly for other skippers it is too late and the 2012 season lies in tatters.

Today's forecast shows another poor week in prospect and while the weather is to improve for next weekend's bank holiday it is not to the extent that it will be a memorable one with cold northerly winds forecast and temperatures of only 9 degrees until next Tueday at least. It seems hard to imagine that in March Ireland was basking in temperatures in the low 20s.

Storm damage is still being assessed in Skerries and Bray where most of the damage has occurred.

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Yachts lie wrecked on the rocks in North Dublin. Photos: Dean Jacobs

Less than a week since the boats were craned in at Skerries Sailing Club ISORA champion yacht Raging Bull, skippered by Matt Davis, was on the rocks.

ragingbulldeanjacobs

The yacht was among others to be washed ashore in Skerries in north Dublin when moorings apparently broke in the extreme conditions.

In Bray Co. Wickow, no sooner had crews lifted boats in than the crane was back in action lifting Sailing Club yachts out of the harbour again only some were not so lucky.

There is little doubt about the severtiy of the storms that even caused problems in Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin where the yacht club pontoon at the Royal St. George Yacht Club was damaged in the first of the storms.

Amazingly through all of this yacht club racing programmes have been followed without a hitch except for the SB3s scrubbed last Sunday.  Howth concluded its Spring Warmer series, DBSC has had two great Saturday race days and in between gales the ISORA fleet raced 47 miles from Dun Laoghaire to Wicklow and back.

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Damage to yacht club pontoons inside Dun Laoghaire harbour

The new harbour in Greystones was also tested this month and there were many onlookers. The consensus appears that it s been well built but over-topping (where waves can crash over the top of the brekwaters) might make berths in the new marina basin inhospitable when the marina is eventually installed there.

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Waves crash over the new harbour walls in Greystones in the first week of April

We are documenting the damage to boats causd by the gales. If you have photos or videos please send them to [email protected]

Published in News Update
Tagged under

#SHIPPING - The transfer of hazardous cargo from the stricken tanker at the entrance to Belfast Lough has been delayed yet again due to winds nearing hurricane strength.

The Belfast Telegraph reports that the Genmar Conpanion - which was redirected to Belfast after reporting a cracked hull en route from Rotterdam to New York - will remain sheltering off the Copeland Islands until the weather improves.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the ship-to-ship transfer of 54,000 tonnes of vacuum gas oil was originally scheduled to take place on 31 December last, but the task was pushed back as the receiving ship, BW Seine, was delayed by weather in the North Sea.

It had then been hoped to begin the transfer early yesterday with the receiving ship's arrival, but the strong storm-force winds that have increasingly battered Ireland in the last 36 hours put paid to those plans.

Ship-to-ship transfers can take place in wind speeds of up to 35 knots, but yesterday the wind speed in Belfast Lough was reported as more than double that.

Hugh Shaw, the NI Secretary of State's representative for maritime salvage and intervention, told the Belfast Telegraph: "As soon as we have a window to do the ship-to-ship transfer safely we will take it.

"Winds have been dropping a bit, but it looks unlikely the operation will take place on Wednesday."

Published in Ports & Shipping

#WEATHER - Ireland has been warned to brace for further strong winds set to sweep across the country today (4 January),

The Irish Times reports. Winds reaching near hurricane speeds have affected coastal communities in the north and northwest, peaking at a remarkable 168km/h in Donegal.

Thousands of euro worth of damage was caused when the roofs of traditional thatched cottages at Cruit Island in west Donegal were blown away.

But the west and east have also been hard hit, with storm-force gales exceeding 100km/h uprooting trees and disrupting electricity supply.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, ferry services on the east coast have been severely affected. Irish Ferries cancelled two fast ferries from Dublin to Holyhead yesterday, and today's early Jonathan Swift sailings between Dublin and Holyhead were also cancelled.

Met Éireann expects wind speeds to be lower today, but could still reach 90-120km/h in some areas.

The Irish Times has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Weather

#SURFING - British surfer Jayce Robinson wasn't about to let the largest wave ever recorded off Ireland's shores go by without giving it a shot.

And as Sky News Online reports, he was captured doing exactly that on Tuesday afternoon.

The Cornish surfing pro told the website: "It was definitely the biggest barrell I've ever surfed.

"I was a little nervous but I didn't have time to think about it - it's almost like a car crash, you don't know what's happening."

Robinson rode the giant wave for 20 seconds before the lip crashed down and knocked him off his board.

His surfing partner Lyndon Wake, who towed him to the swell at Mullaghmore Head, said: "It's always a worst case scenario when your tow partner wipes out. Lucky he managed to come out the other side OK."

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, storm force winds off the coast of Donegal produced monster rollers of over 20 metres (over 60 feet) in height detected in Donegal Bay.

Mullaghmore Head will once again welcome the world's top big wave surfers for the second annual Tow-In Surf Session in the New Year.

Published in Surfing

#STORM – Members of the public have today been urged to heed the advice of the Irish Coast Guard as Met Eireann has forecast very windy or stormy conditions today with winds gusting 100 to 140km/hr, strongest along the North coast.

A severe weather alert and gale warning has been issued by Met Eireann as west to southwest gales or strong gales are forecast to continue this afternoon on all Irish coastal waters and on the Irish Sea, with storm force winds for a time on coasts from Erris Head to Rossan Point to Fair Head. Squally showers or thunderstorms will give some wintry falls of sleet and snow especially on hills but at some low levels also. The showers will be most frequent in the North and West with blizzard-like conditions on some hills.

Severe weather such as this brings not only high winds, but the risk of heavy downpours and the potential for spot flooding. The Coast Guard strongly advise the public not to go out on exposed coasts, cliffs, piers, harbour walls, beaches, promenades or any other coastal areas during the inclement weather. Huge waves can be whipped up by high seas. These waves can pose hazards to anyone close to the shoreline.

Wintry showers are forecast to continue tonight in the North, Northwest and Southwest overnight with falls of sleet or snow. Showers will be isolated elsewhere. The wind will moderate and it will be very cold with lowest temperatures of plus 2 to minus 2 degrees with some frost and icy patches. Manager of the Irish Coast Guard, Declan Geoghegan said: "Do not attempt to cross at fast running river or flood water fords as they may be stronger and deeper than you think. Flooded urban areas may contain many hazards, not least of which include submerged open manholes and downed power lines. The combination of tides, forecasted gale warnings for the next day or so, high sea conditions and swollen rivers may result in very dangerous conditions."

Remember to monitor weather broadcasts when travelling and heed the advice of the RSA on road use during severe weather and high winds.

Specific advice from the Coast Guard today (13 December 2011) is:

· Stay away from the shoreline and do not engage in water sports

· Do not venture out unnecessarily when gale force conditions are forecast

· The public are advised to avoid exposed coasts, cliff paths and coastal areas during inclement weather this week

· Owners of small vessels and fishing vessels in coastal waters should seek shelter and secure them properly with moorings.

If you do see someone in difficulty in the sea, on the shore, cliffs, lakes or rivers dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard.

Published in Coastguard
Tagged under

#WEATHER - The Irish Coast Guard has warned people to stay away from cliff paths and other coastal areas as near hurricane force winds continue to batter the country, the Irish Examiner reports.

As of this morning, Met Éireann was expecting gusts of up to 140 kilometres an hour in Connacht and Ulster.

All Irish coastal areas are expected to experience strong gales. Winds will occasionally reaching violent storm force 11 on coasts from Rossan Point to Malin Head to Fair Head this afternoon, according to meteorologists.

Published in Weather

As predicted in Afloat's online reader poll Howth Yacht Storm (Pat Kelly) has lifted the Irish Cruiser Racer Association's Boat of the Year award at this afternoon's ICRA conference in Dun Laoghaire.

Among other wins, the J109 design counted five firsts in an impressive vistory in class one IRC at this year's ICRA Nationals held in Crosshaven.

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Boat of the Year Storm in winning style. Photo: Bob Bateman

 

 

 

Published in ICRA

Ireland has battened down the hatches because of fears Hurricane Katia would wreak widespread havoc with storm-force winds and giant waves. The Coast Guard has issued a weather alert warning people to stay away from cliff edges. Boaters are also warned of the dangers of walking near exposed quays.

hurricane_katia

Hurricane Katia as seen from the space station

Published in Marine Warning
Page 3 of 4

Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.

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