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Displaying items by tag: seals

Feeding harbour seals could land Howth visitors with a fine for thousands of euro, according to a recent letter in The Irish Times.
Milo Kane writes of a new notice placed near the west pier by harbour officials which "threatens a draconian €5,000 fine on any person feeding seals from the pier".
He also claims that local traders and harbour staff he spoke to could give no "commercial or biological reason" for the ban, which he says will ultimately result in fewer visitors to Fingal.
We're keen to hear from anyone who know the reason behind this new sign in
Howth. Leave a comment below if you know the answer.

Feeding harbour seals could land Howth visitors with a fine for thousands of euro, according to a recent letter in The Irish Times.

Milo Kane writes of a new notice placed near the west pier by harbour officials which "threatens a draconian €5,000 fine on any person feeding seals from the pier".

He also claims that local traders and harbour staff he spoke to could give no "commercial or biological reason" for the ban, which he says will ultimately result in fewer visitors to Fingal.

We're keen to hear from anyone who know the reason behind this new sign in Howth. Leave a comment below if you know the answer.

Published in Dublin Bay
Did you say 'recession'? Heir Island Sailing School is reporting a 'boom', according to its latest press release. Between 2009 and 2010 the sail training activity and generated income of this Sailing School situated at Heir (Hare) Island, West Cork, has largely increased in this extremely difficult year for sports and tourism industry.

The Principal John Moore has discounted all prices by 20 to 30%. All 2009 sailors returned in 2010 and brought friends with them. The French network of the newly appointed Director of Sailing Hugues Traonmilin has brought French families to the island and the French sailors were mixed with the Irish and British children and adults with great success. In addition to a busy summer season, 60 students of a South East College came for the very first time to the Sailing School in March 2010 as part of the Transition Year programme. They were hosted with full board accommodation at the Sailing School Guest house.

Definitely the location of the Sailing School plays a big part in this success story. Heir Island is located in the middle of Roaring Water Bay half way between Schull and Baltimore. Whatever direction you sail from the Sailing School beach, you'll encounter wonderful maritime landscapes and crystal clear waters. The Topaz dinghy fleet may sail to 3 or 4 different sandy beaches on one sailing day. The 3 Dublin Bay Mermaids sailing in flotilla explore the surrounding islands of Castle Island, Sherkin Island, the 3 Calves Islands and of course the Carthy's Islands to visit the seals colony.

Such a fantastic location has orientated the programme of this Sailing School towards the "Adventure" courses of the Irish Sailing Association. The school offers Adventure 1 & 2 courses as their "speciality" course.

2011 perspectives are already very encouraging with a second college to be hosted in Spring for a 10 day transition programme meanwhile the first one is returning after excellent feedback of the 2010 students and teachers. Being a family run business makes this small company very flexible and the range of their activities covers young sailors from 8 years old to adults, groups and families, on dinghies or on a traditional Heir Island Lobster Boat, and on kayaks if you don't want to sail. Also as a qualified Yachtmaster Instructor, the director of sailing has facilitated individually tailored sail training for yacht owners aboard their own yacht, an option that has proven both practical and successful.

More information HERE.

Published in Marine Trade
20th January 2011

Erris Seals Back in the Wild

Whitecoat seal pups Snowy and Cecil were finally returned to the wild on Tuesday after their original Saturday release was postponed.
The two seals, who were reabilitated by the Irish Seal Sanctuary at Courtown Harbour after being found on the Erris Peninsula last October, were released from Blacksod Point.
Mayo Today has photos of the successful release HERE.

Whitecoat seal pups Snowy and Cecil were finally returned to the wild on Tuesday after their original Saturday release was postponed.

The two seals, who were reabilitated by the Irish Seal Sanctuary at Courtown Harbour after being found on the Erris Peninsula last October, were successfully released from Blacksod Point.

Mayo Today has photos of the release HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife
The family of a drowning victim are exploring the idea that seals could be utilised to recover bodies lost in rivers or at sea, The Clare People reports.
Brian Mooney - father of 31-year-old Brecan Mooney, whose body was never recovered after falling into the River Lee in Cork last November - said he had been in contact with the Irish Seal Sanctuary about the potential for seals to be trained to locate bodies in the water.
“We’re looking at the possibility of training seals to find bodies," he told The Clare People at the inquest into his son's death in Cork last week. "It’s never been done before anywhere, but they think there is a real possibility it could be done.”

The family of a drowning victim are exploring the idea that seals could be utilised to recover bodies lost in rivers or at sea, The Clare People reports.

Brian Mooney - father of 31-year-old Brecan Mooney, whose body was never recovered after falling into the River Lee in Cork last November - said he had been in contact with the Irish Seal Sanctuary about the potential for seals to be trained to locate bodies in the water.

“We’re looking at the possibility of training seals to find bodies," he told The Clare People at the inquest into his son's death in Cork last week. "It’s never been done before anywhere, but they think there is a real possibility it could be done.”

Published in Water Safety
28th November 2010

Grey Seal Gets a Big Send Off

Last week saw the Irish Seal Sanctuary celebrate the release of Debbie, the first grey seal to receive care at the group's Courtown Harbour facility.
Photos of the release in Tramore are available HERE at the Irish Seal Sanctuary's website.
The sanctuary also last week welcomed its latest addition, a whitecoat pup named Pinky from the Belmullet Peninsula in Co Mayo.

Last week saw the Irish Seal Sanctuary celebrate the release of Debbie, the first grey seal to receive care at the group's Courtown Harbour facility.

Photos of the release in Tramore are available at the Irish Seal Sanctuary's website HERE.

The sanctuary also last week welcomed its latest addition, a whitecoat pup named Pinky from the Belmullet Peninsula in Co Mayo.

Published in Marine Wildlife
Page 6 of 6

Coastal Notes Coastal Notes covers a broad spectrum of stories, events and developments in which some can be quirky and local in nature, while other stories are of national importance and are on-going, but whatever they are about, they need to be told.

Stories can be diverse and they can be influential, albeit some are more subtle than others in nature, while other events can be immediately felt. No more so felt, is firstly to those living along the coastal rim and rural isolated communities. Here the impact poses is increased to those directly linked with the sea, where daily lives are made from earning an income ashore and within coastal waters.

The topics in Coastal Notes can also be about the rare finding of sea-life creatures, a historic shipwreck lost to the passage of time and which has yet many a secret to tell. A trawler's net caught hauling more than fish but cannon balls dating to the Napoleonic era.

Also focusing the attention of Coastal Notes, are the maritime museums which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of historical exhibits for future generations.

Equally to keep an eye on the present day, with activities of existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector and those of the energy exploration industry.

In addition Coastal Notes has many more angles to cover, be it the weekend boat leisure user taking a sedate cruise off a long straight beach on the coast beach and making a friend with a feathered companion along the way.

In complete contrast is to those who harvest the sea, using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety poses an issue, before they set off to ply their trade at the foot of our highest sea cliffs along the rugged wild western seaboard.

It's all there, as Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied to the environment from which they came from and indeed which shape people's interaction with the surrounding environment that is the natural world and our relationship with the sea.

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