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A Harbour Seal photographed at Dun Laoghaire Marina on Dublin Bay, Ireland. Also known as the common seal, is a true seal found along temperate and Arctic marine coastlines of the Northern Hemisphere. The most widely distributed species of pinnipeds, they are found in coastal waters of the northern Atlantic and Pacific oceans, Baltic and North seas. Photo: AfloatA photograph of a Harbour Seal taken at Dun Laoghaire Marina on Dublin Bay, Ireland. Also known as the common seal, this species can be found along temperate and Arctic marine coastlines throughout the Northern Hemisphere. They are the most widely distributed species of pinnipeds and can be found in the coastal waters of the northern Atlantic and Pacific oceans, as well as the Baltic and North Seas. Photo: Afloat

Displaying items by tag: rowing

Lurgan’s Linda Blakely aims to cross the treacherous 3,000-mile Atlantic Ocean in a 12-foot boat aptly named Ulster Warrior, reports the Sunday Life.

She will start 2024 attempting to break a world record for a female solo rower, which is 40 days and 19 hours, set by 35-year-old Englishwoman Victoria Evans in 2022. Linda, who will be 50 about halfway through the challenge aims to raise £100,000 for the charity Action Medical Research.

She plans to set off from Gran Canaria to St Lucia in the Caribbean on January 7, weather-permitting, and hopes to arrive in St Lucia 40 days later, where her brother Peter and his family will be there to welcome her ashore.

Linda lives in London, where she runs three homes for young people with special needs. In 2018, she became the first woman in the UK to summit both Everest and Lhotse within a day.

Other accolades are competition in Iron Man challenges and winning a silver medal in European championships in long-distance triathlons with Team GB.

She tells the Belfast Telegraph that her mission is to become the fastest woman in the world to cross the Atlantic alone. She explains: “When I first thought about doing it, the record was 49 days, which seemed to be there for the taking, but then Victoria (Evans) did it in 40 days. She set a tough benchmark. Until this year, I had never rowed before, but I have a great club in London, the Sons of the Thames, who have taken me under their wing and taught me how to row, and I’ve been doing some racing with them.”

More from Sunday Life here

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Ireland's rowing team has made history at the 2023 World Rowing Championships, finishing the competition with four medals and securing seven crews for the Paris 2024 event. This marks the most crews that Ireland has ever qualified for at the World Championships, with only four crews qualifying during the Tokyo cycle. 

Although some crews did not qualify, they still have a chance at the Final Qualification Regatta in May. One of the highlights of the event was Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch's bronze medal win in the men's double. The duo started slow and were at the back of the pack in the first 1000 metres. However, they made a strong comeback and secured the bronze medal, racing right to the line with the Croatian double and coming in just one second behind the Sinkovic's. 

Alison Bergin and Zoe Hyde, the young women's double, also put in a commendable performance, managing to stay at the top of the pack throughout the race and finishing in fourth place. They missed out on a podium finish by just one and a half seconds, but their impressive performance has marked them as a crew to watch in the future. 

This historic week for Irish rowing has seen incredible racing, with the team's eye now firmly set on the Paris event next year. The team's performance has demonstrated that they are on the up, and the future looks bright for Irish rowing.

Day 7 Results

Men's Double A Final -> BRONZE
Women's Double A Final - > 4th

Overall Results
Lightweight Men's Double -> GOLD and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Lightweight Women's Scull -> GOLD
Men's Pair -> BRONZE and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Men's Double -> BRONZE and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Women's Pair -> 4th and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Women's Double -> 4th and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
PR2 Mixed Double -> 5th and PARALYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Lightweight women's Double -> 1st B Final and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
W4- -> 3rd B Final
M4x -> 1st C Final
M4- -> 3rd C Final
LM1x -> 5th D Final

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Irish crews have secured two more medals and one more Paris 2024 qualification on Day 7 of the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia. This brings Ireland's total to seven Paris 2024 qualifications, marking the largest number of qualifications in Rowing Ireland's history.

Lightweight Men's Double Scull World Champions Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan have defended their title for another year, clinching gold with another dominant performance. Despite the Swiss taking an early lead, McCarthy and O'Donovan showed their strength in the second half of the race, crossing the finish line ahead of Switzerland and Italy. This marks their third consecutive World Championship win.

A third consecutive World Championship win for Lightweight Men's Double Scullers Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'DonovanA third consecutive World Championship win for Lightweight Men's Double Scullers Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan

Lightweight Men's Double Scull World defending Champions Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan top the podium at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, SerbiaLightweight Men's Double Scull World defending Champions Paul McCarthy and Fintan O'Donovan top the podium at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia

Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan from Enniskillen secured another medal for Ireland with a bronze in the Men's pair. They led the race for the first half, taking the Swiss and Great Britain by surprise. Although favourites for the gold medal, Tom George and Ollie Wynne-Griffith from GB came back in the third quarter of the race and battled down to the line with Timoney and Corrigan for second place. In the end, Switzerland took the lead, and Ireland just missed out on the surge and had to settle for the bronze medal.

Bronze medalists - Ross Corrigan and Nathan Timoney with coach Nicolo Maurogiovanni and Rowing Ireland High Performance Director Antonio Maurogiovanni Bronze medalists - Ross Corrigan and Nathan Timoney with coach Nicolo Maurogiovanni and Rowing Ireland High Performance Director Antonio Maurogiovanni 

Aoife Casey and Margaret Cremen have qualified the Lightweight Women's Double for Paris 2024, winning the B final. Though nerves were high before they took to the water, Casey and Cremen remained cool and collected, finishing with clear water over the field. They finished the World Championships in seventh place and secured a spot for next year.

Aoife Casey and Margaret Cremen have qualified the Lightweight Women's Double for Paris 2024, winning the B finalAoife Casey and Margaret Cremen have qualified the Lightweight Women's Double for Paris 2024, winning the B final and below pictured with family in Serbia

In the PR2 Mix2x, Katie O'Brien and Steven McGowan took fifth place in the world. After qualifying for the Paralympics earlier in the week, they had a bit of a rough start when they caught a crab in the second half of the race. However, they quickly regained their composure and finished strong.

"This brings Ireland's total to seven Paris 2024 qualifications, marking the largest number of qualifications in Rowing Ireland's history"

Aifric Keogh and Fiona Murtagh just missed out on a podium finish, coming in fourth place. Though they fought hard to get into medal position in the last 500 meters, they were narrowly beaten by crews from the Netherlands, Australia, and Romania.

Eimear Lambe, Sanita Puspure, Imogen Lambe, and Natalie Long finished in third place in the B final of the women's four. Though they were hot on the heels of the crew from Denmark, New Zealand claimed the qualification position in the end.

Finally, John Kearney, Jack Dorney, Adam Browne, and Fionnán McQuillan-Tolan finished in third place in the C final of the men's four. Despite starting from the back of the pack, they showed incredible perseverance in the last 500 meters and finished nearly neck and neck with the Chinese four. Nevertheless, China claimed second position across the line.

Overall, it was an impressive showing for the Irish crews, who proved their strength and skill on the international stage.

Day 7 Results

Lightweight Men's Double A Final -> GOLD
Men['s Pair A Final -> BRONZE
Lightweight Women's Double B Final ->1st and OLYMPIC QUALIFICATION
Women's Pair A Final -> 4th
PR2 Mixed Double A Final -> 5th
Women's Four B Final -> 3rd
Men's Quad C Final -> 1st
Men's Four C Final -> 3rd

Sunday Schedule (IST)

12:39pm - Men's Double A Final
12:54pm - Women's Double A Final

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Siobhán McCrohan, a member of the Tribesmen Rowing Club in Ireland, secured a gold medal in the lightweight women's sculls final at the World Rowing Championships held in Belgrade, Serbia. McCrohan, aged 36, faced stiff competition from Mexican Kenia Lechuga and American Sophia Luwis, but her outstanding performance earned her the top spot on the podium. 

Despite the gruelling conditions in Belgrade, McCrohan executed her race plan to perfection. She paced herself in the early stages of the race while Martine Veldhuis of the Netherlands took an early lead. By the 500m mark, McCrohan had settled into third place behind Veldhuis and Lechuga, with the Dutch women already being reeled in. 

McCrohan improved to second place at the halfway point, sitting on the shoulder of Lechuga, just 0.27 behind the Mexican as Veldhuis was unable to keep pace and dropped out of the reckoning. Luwis then forced her way into the conversation, putting pressure on McCrohan, who kept her cool and stuck to her race plan, waiting for her moment to attack as she, Veldhuis, and Luwis pulled away from the chasing pack. 

McCrohan made her move as the scullers passed the 1500m mark. She upped her work rate and, with 300m to go, overtook Veldhuis, never looking back. With clear, calm water in front of her, she extended her lead in the closing stages, pulling away from Lechuga and Luwis, leaving the Mexican to win the battle for silver. 

McCrohan finished the race in 8:47.96, securing her first world championship gold medal after returning to representing Ireland this summer following a seven-year absence. Although she finished just off the podium in June's European Championships, she claimed world glory in her first season back in the boat, albeit in a non-Olympic class. 

"I only really came back to proper training in the winter of this season, so it's been a good comeback!" McCrohan told RTÉ Sport. "It wasn't so much that I made a decision that I should come back; it was that I couldn't stay away any longer." 

McCrohan's gold medal is a significant achievement for the Tribesmen Rowing Club member, who is traditionally used to the fast-flowing waters of the River Corrib. Although she had to face offshore winds in Belgrade, she took them in her stride, saying, "We all have to row in the same conditions, so it's worth noting that the race just takes longer." 

McCrohan's victory adds to the success of the Irish team at the World Rowing Championships. Both the men's and women's double sculls crews secured their boats' places at Paris 2024 for Ireland.

Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch finished just over a second behind the Croatian boat in their semi-final, while Alison Bergin and Zoe Hyde were also second, closely behind Americans Kristina Wagner and Sophia Vitas. 

While Jake McCarthy finished fifth in the lightweight men's single sculls D Final, McCrohan's gold medal will undoubtedly be a highlight of Ireland's performance at this year's championships.

Watch the World Rowing Championships on Saturday and Sunday from 12 pm on the RTE News Channel and RTE Player.

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Three Irish rowing crews have qualified for the A and B finals at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia, and secured their spots at the Paris Olympics next summer.

Irish Women's Pair Aifric Keogh and Fiona Murtagh. With a second-place finish, the two Galway rowers are into the A Final. Murtagh and Keogh have shown good speed throughout this Championships and will be leaving it all on the line this Saturday in the hopes of making it on to that podium. at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, SerbiaIrish Women's Pair Aifric Keogh and Fiona Murtagh. With a second-place finish, the two Galway rowers are into the A Final. Murtagh and Keogh have shown good speed throughout this Championships and will be leaving it all on the line this Saturday in the hopes of making it on to that podium. at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia

Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh put in an impressive performance to secure a women's pair spot for Ireland. The duo finished second in their semi-final, just behind the Romanian pair of Roxana Anghel and Ioana Vrinceanu.

22 year old Nathan Timoney and 24 year old Ross Corrigan have been on top form this week and have today qualified a men's pair for Ireland at Paris 2024. Timoney and Corrigan grew up rowing together with Enniskillen Royal BC in Fermanagh and are putting themselves up there with the top crews here at the World Championships. Ireland went out hard and held second position right from the start. With South Africa hot on their heels coming into the final sprint, they took it up another gear finishing with the fastest final 500. Their second place result sends them through to Saturday's A Final where they'll race the best of the best.22 year old Nathan Timoney and 24 year old Ross Corrigan have been on top form this week and have today qualified a men's pair for Ireland at Paris 2024. Timoney and Corrigan grew up rowing together with Enniskillen Royal BC in Fermanagh and are putting themselves up there with the top crews here at the World Championships. Ireland went out hard and held second position right from the start. With South Africa hot on their heels coming into the final sprint, they took it up another gear finishing with the fastest final 500. Their second place result sends them through to Saturday's A Final where they'll race the best of the best.

Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan also secured a men's pair spot for Ireland at Paris 2024. The pair came in second in their semi-final, with South Africa hot on their heels in the final sprint.

Reigning Olympic and World Champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy have secured a spot at Paris for the lightweight men's double. Making it look easy, O'Donovan and McCarthy held their composure through the first half of the race, passing the first marker in fifth place and the halfway mark in second place. Relying on their incredible strength and fitness, they were able to focus on their own race and one by one came through the other crews. In the end they finished with clear water ahead of the field with Czechia and Norway coming in behind them to take the remaining two spots to the A Final.Reigning Olympic and World Champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy have secured a spot at Paris for the lightweight men's double. Making it look easy, O'Donovan and McCarthy held their composure through the first half of the race, passing the first marker in fifth place and the halfway mark in second place. Relying on their incredible strength and fitness, they were able to focus on their own race and one by one came through the other crews. In the end they finished with clear water ahead of the field with Czechia and Norway coming in behind them to take the remaining two spots to the A Final

Reigning Olympic and World Champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy secured a spot in the lightweight men's double, dominating their semi-final and finishing with clear water ahead of the field.

However, the lightweight women's double of Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey narrowly missed out on an A final spot and will race in the B final on Saturday.

Eimear Lambe, Sanita Puspure, Imogen Magner, and Natalie Long finished in fifth place in the women's four, sending them through to the B final.

Siobhán McCrohan put in a stellar performance in the lightweight women's scull, winning her A/B semi-final and securing a place in the A final.

Tribesmen's Siobhán McCrohan is into the lightweight women's scull A Final after a win in her A/B Semi. Handling the tough conditions like a pro, McCrohan sailed over the waves and held a consistent speed throughout the race. Moving into the leading position in the third quarter, there was no looking back as she continued to pull away from the other crews. She will race the A Final tomorrow afternoon where she will be looking for a place on the podium.Tribesmen's Siobhán McCrohan is into the lightweight women's scull A Final after a win in her A/B Semi. Handling the tough conditions like a pro, McCrohan sailed over the waves and held a consistent speed throughout the race. Moving into the leading position in the third quarter, there was no looking back as she continued to pull away from the other crews. She will race the A Final tomorrow afternoon where she will be looking for a place on the podium.

Siobhán McCrohan in the lightweight women's scull at the World Rowing Championships in Bled, Slovenia

Jake McCarthy will compete in the D final of the lightweight men's scull against New Zealand, Norway, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Finland.

All six crews have done Ireland proud, and rowing fans will be eagerly anticipating their performances in the A and B finals.

Day 5 Results (Irish interest)
Women's Pair A/B Semi 2nd -> A Final and Olympic Qualification
Men's Pair A/B Semi 2nd -> A Final and Olympic Qualification
Lightweight Men's Double A/B Semi 1st -> A Final and Olympic Qualification
Lightweight Women's Double A/B Semi 4th -> B Final
Women's Four A/B Semi 5th -> B Final
Lightweight Women's Scull A/B Semi 1st -> A Final
Lightweight Men's Scull A/B Semi 6th -> D Final

Friday Schedule (IST)
9:45am - Men's Double A/B Semi
9:55am - Women's Double A/B Semi
12:05pm - Lightweight Men's D Final
13:15pm - Lightweight Women's A Final

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Irish rowers are making waves at the ongoing World Rowing Championships in Serbia, with three more crews advancing to the A/B Semi-finals and one step closer to the Paris 2024 Olympics.

The lightweight men's double of Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy left no doubt in the quarterfinals, finishing in style with clear water ahead of the remaining boats. This win ensures their spot in the A/B Semis tomorrow with the fastest time.

Irish M2 pair Ross Corrigan and Nathan Timoney at the World Rowing Championships in SerbiaIrish M2 pair Ross Corrigan and Nathan Timoney at the World Rowing Championships in Serbia

Birthday boy Nathan Timoney and his pair partner Ross Corrigan also secured a place in the top 12 men's pairs, while the men's double of Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch also advanced to the A/B Semis.

The men's double of Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch advanced to the A/B Semis at the World Rowing Championships in SerbiaThe men's double of Philip Doyle and Daire Lynch advanced to the A/B Semis at the World Rowing Championships in Serbia

Skibbereen's Jake McCarthy finished fifth in the quarterfinal of the lightweight men's scull, sending him through to the C/D Semi-final. However, it was not enough to secure him a place in the A/B Semis.

Jake McCarthy finished fifth in the quarterfinal of the lightweight men's scull, sending him through to the C/D Semi-final at the World Rowing Championships in SerbiaJake McCarthy finished fifth in the quarterfinal of the lightweight men's scull, sending him through to the C/D Semi-final at the World Rowing Championships in Serbia

The Irish crews will face tough competition from Mexico, Poland, Norway, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Norway, Spain, Croatia, New Zealand, and Germany in the upcoming rounds. With windy conditions forecasted for tomorrow, the race schedule has been moved forward to ensure fair competition.

The Irish rowers have a bright chance to qualify for the Paris 2024 Olympics, and the upcoming races promise to be exciting for Irish fans.

Wednesday Results (Irish interest)
Lightweight Men's Scull Quarterfinal 5th -> C/D Semi
Lightweight Men's Double Quarterfinal 1st -> A/B Semi
Men's Pair Quarterfinal 2nd -> A/B Semi
Men's Double Quarterfinal 2nd -> A/B Semi

Thursday Schedule (IST)
8:35am - Women's Pair A/B Semi
9:05am - Men's Pair A/B Semi
9:25am - Lightweight Women's Double A/B Semi
9:35am - Lightweight Men's Double A/B Semi
10:05am - Women's Four A/B Semi
11:35am - Lightweight Women's Scull A/B Semi
14:25pm - Lightweight Men's Scull C/D Semi

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Galway Rowing Rowing Club rowers Katie O'Brien and Steven McGowan have secured Ireland's first boat for the upcoming Paralympic Games in Paris 2024.

The duo competed in the PR2 mixed double at the World Rowing Championships and emerged victorious, earning the sole qualifying position for the 2024 Paralympics.

It's been 11 years since Ireland has had a crew compete in the Paralympics, with the PR3 mixed coxed four in London 2012. But O'Brien and McGowan's inspiring performance has ensured that the country will be represented once again next year.

Katie O'Brien had been unable to find a double partner prior to the Tokyo Olympics, but she finally realized her dream at this year's World Championships. Meanwhile, Steven McGowan, who only picked up the sport less than two years ago, has made remarkable progress to compete at the level he is now.

The Irish duo had a strong start in their heat and were right in the mix with World Cup III bronze medallists Michal Gadowski and Jolanta Majka of Poland. The 2022 World Champions, Ukraine, were unable to keep up with the pace that was set and struggled to move into the top grouping. With only one crew to progress straight into the A Final, O'Brien and McGowan had to make a move to put themselves in the lead spot. And through the third 500m, Ireland was the fastest boat on the water, pushing their bow ahead of Poland. In the end, O'Brien and McGowan secured the ticket to Paris, leaving no chance for their competitors to catch up.

Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh, another Galway pairing, also performed remarkably in the women's pair repechage. With an incredible start, they led the field by over two seconds by the first 500m mark. Italy's Aisha Rocek and Alice Codato tried to catch up with Fiona and Aifric, but they failed to break their lead. With their first-place finish, the Irish duo qualified for the A/B Semis on Thursday morning.

However, the men's four of John Kearney, Jack Dorney, Adam Murphy, and Fionnán McQuillan-Tolan missed out on the A/B Semis. They will race the C Final after finishing fifth in their repechage. The crew had a promising start, sitting in second place through the halfway point. But all the crews stayed in contention, and coming into the last quarter, Ireland had moved back to fifth place. There wasn't enough left to push into the top three for a spot in the A/B Semi.

In the men's quad, Brian Colsh, Andrew Sheehan, Ronan Byrne, and Konan Pazzaia had a fourth-place finish in their repechage, missing out on the A/B Semi. As the race progressed, Ireland made their way closer to the top three, and in the final 500m, they were the fastest boat on the water. But it wasn't enough to edge them ahead of the American crew.

Overall, it was a great day for Irish rowing, with O'Brien and McGowan securing the first boat for the country in the 2024 Paralympics. The country will be looking forward to more success in the coming days of the World Rowing Championships.

Day 3 Results (Irish interest)

PR2 Mixed Double Heat 1st -> A Final and Paralympic Qualification
Women's Pair Repechage 1st -> A/B Semi
Men's Four Repechage 5th -> C Final
Men's Quad Repechage 4th -> C Final

Wednesday Schedule (IST)
11:43am - Lightweight Men's Scull Quarterfinal
11:50am - Lightweight Men's Double Quarterfinal
12:18pm - Men's Pair Quarterfinal
12:53pm - Men's Double Quarterfinal

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Seven Irish crews were afloat for the second day of the 2023 World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia, with impressive performances across multiple events.

The women's pair of Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh secured a place in the repechage after finishing second in their heat, while Cork's Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey advanced directly to the A/B Semi of the lightweight women's double.

Cork's Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey were racing in the second day of the 2023 World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, SerbiaCork's Margaret Cremen and Aoife Casey were racing in the second day of the 2023 World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia

Alison Bergin and Zoe Hyde won their heat in the women's double, securing a place in the A/B Semi and giving themselves a chance to qualify for the Paris 2024 Olympics.

The women's pair of Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh secured a place in the repechage after finishing second in their heatThe women's pair of Fiona Murtagh and Aifric Keogh secured a place in the repechage after finishing second in their heat

The women's four team of Eimear Lambe, Sanita Puspure, Imogen Magner, and Natalie Long also made it through to the A/B Semi, finishing third in their heat.

However, the men's four and quad teams will need to fight their way through the repechage to progress.

Despite finishing sixth in their heat, John Kearney, Jack Dorney, Adam Murphy, and Fionnán McQuillan-Tolan will race again in the repechage for a chance to make the A/B Semi.

Similarly, the men's quad of Brian Colsh, Andrew Sheehan, Ronan Byrne, and Konan Pazzaia finished sixth in their heat but will have another opportunity to qualify for the Semi in the repechage.

Lightweight sculler Jake McCarthy of SkibbereenLightweight sculler Jake McCarthy of Skibbereen

Skibbereen's Jake McCarthy secured a place in the quarterfinals of the lightweight sculler event after winning his repechage.

Day 2 Results (Irish interest)
W2- Heat 2nd -> Repechage
LW2x Heat 2nd -> A/B Semi
W2x Heat 1st -> A/B Semi
W4- Heat 3rd -> A/B Semi
M4- Heat 6th -> Repechage
M4x Heat 6th -> Repechage
LM1x Repechage 1st -> Quarterfinal

Tuesday Schedule (IST)
9:30am - PR2 Mix2x Heat
10:40am - W2- Repechage
11:15am - M4- Repechage
11:36am - M4x Repechage

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Skibbereen rower Jake McCarthy is into the repechage of the men's lightweight scull after a fifth place finish in his heat on day one of the 2023 World Rowing Championships in Serbia.

Right up until the final 200 metres McCarthy and the sculler from Belgium were sitting bowballs apart, fighting for that fourth place position for a ticket straight into the quarterfinals. Coming to the line it was Marlon Colpaert of Belgium that was able to hold on to the momentum and take that final spot. Jake races again tomorrow afternoon for a place in the quarterfinals.

Siobhán McCrohan (Tribesmen RC) is into the A/B Semi's of the lightweight women's scull at the World Rowing Championships in BelgradeSiobhán McCrohan (Tribesmen RC) is into the A/B Semi's of the lightweight women's scull at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade

Siobhán McCrohan (Tribesmen RC) has cruised into the A/B Semi's of the lightweight women's scull with a second place finish in her heat. The race was reduced to a four boat race due to the Individual Neutral Athlete Anastasiia Liubich failing to make weight prior to racing. With two boats to progress through to the A/B Semi finals Siobhán made her mark early on in the race, opening up the initial lead. Going with her was the Romanian sculler and after the two created a significant gap to the remaining boats they settled into the race. Siobhán is up next on Thursday morning for the A/B Semi.

Olympic champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy had a solid performance in the heat of the lightweight men's double at the World Rowing Championships in BelgradeOlympic champions Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy had a solid performance in the heat of the lightweight men's double at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade

Paul O'Donovan and Fintan McCarthy are back in the winning spirit with a solid performance in the heat of the lightweight men's double. Taking the lead from the start of the race, there was no catching the 2022 World Champions. New Zealand had a good race moving from fourth to second, but with each 500m the Irish double continued to increase their lead. They race again on Wednesday for the quarterfinals.

An impressive race from the Enniskillen duo of Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan sends them straight through to the men's pair quarterfinals. Hitting a low of 40 strokes per minute in the first 500m Ireland went out hard, placing themselves in the top two with 2022 World Silver Medallists Spain. Through the middle of the race Timoney and Corrigan challenged Spain, moving into the lead of the race.

Enniskillen duo of Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan are straight through to the men's pair quarterfinals at the World Rowing Championships in BelgradeEnniskillen duo of Nathan Timoney and Ross Corrigan are straight through to the men's pair quarterfinals at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade

It was only in the last sprint that Spain picked up their boat speed and came through Ireland beating them by just 1.19 seconds.

Irish rowers Philip Doyle (Portora BC) and Daire Lynch (Clonmel RC) are into the men's doubles quarterfinals at the World Rowing Championships in BelgradeIrish rowers Philip Doyle (Portora BC) and Daire Lynch (Clonmel RC) are into the men's doubles quarterfinals at the World Rowing Championships in Belgrade

Philip Doyle (Portora BC) and Daire Lynch (Clonmel RC) are into the men's doubles quarterfinals with a second-place finish in their heat. It was the American double that led from the start but there was only just over a second separating the top four crews to the first marker. Doyle and Lynch sat in third position until they made their move on the French double coming into the final 400 meters. The French crew, including reigning champion Hugo Boucheron, could not catch Ireland on the line.

Day 1 Results (Irish interest)
LM1x Heat 5th -> Repechage
LW1x Heat 2nd -> A/B Semi
LM2x Heat 1st -> Quarterfinal
M2- Heat 2nd -> Quarterfinal
M2x Heat 2nd -> Quarterfinal

Monday Schedule (IST)  (Irish interest)
9:28am - W2- Heat
9:49am - LW2x Heat
10:25am - W2x Heat
11:21am - W4- Heat
11:35am - M4- Heat
12:24pm - M4x Heat
15:47pm - LM1x Repechage

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Sunday, September 3, marks the beginning of the 2023 World Rowing Championships in Belgrade, Serbia. This is the first opportunity for the rowers to qualify Ireland for the 2024 Paris Olympics.

This year, Rowing Ireland has 28 athletes competing across 12 boat classes. This is the largest number of athletes representing Ireland at a World Rowing Championships.

At last year's Championships, Ireland won four medals; LM2x Gold, PR2 W1x Gold, LW2x Bronze and W2x Bronze.

Jake McCarthy picked up rowing in 2012 after twin brother Fintan joined Skibbereen RC. A major highlight in Jakes's rowing career was in 2016 when he and Fintan made it to the A Final of the European Championships in the LM2x. Jake last raced at the 2019 World Championships where he finished 8th in the LM4x.Jake McCarthy picked up rowing in 2012 after twin brother Fintan joined Skibbereen RC. A major highlight in Jakes's rowing career was in 2016 when he and Fintan made it to the A Final of the European Championships in the LM2x. Jake last raced at the 2019 World Championships where he finished 8th in the LM4x.

Jake McCarthy (Skibbereen RC) will be the first down the course for the heat of the lightweight men's scull. If McCarthy can finish in the top four boats he'll go straight into the quarterfinal, avoiding the repechage. He faces World Cup III silver medallist, Artur Mikolajczewski from Poland and the Austrian sculler Lukas Reim who won the B Final of the same event. This is Jake's first appearance at a World Rowing event since the 2019 World Championships where he finished second in the B Final of the lightweight men's quad.

World Cup III silver medallist, Siobhán McCrohan (Tribesmen RC) has had an impressive season so far picking up a medal in Lucerne and placing fourth at the European Championships in Bled. There has been a mix of athletes on the podium for the lightweight scull in 2023, and with the 2022 World Champion and 2023 European Champion from Romania, moving into the lightweight double, the single scull event is wide open. Two crews progress to the A/B Semi with the remainder going to the repechage. Keep an eye on Gianina Van Groningen, the new sculler for Romania. Groningen finished 6th at the Tokyo Olympics in the lightweight double and raced in the Romanian eight that won bronze at World Cup III.

Reigning World Champions, Paul O'Donovan (UCC RC) and Fintan McCarthy (Skibbereen RC) are back in the lightweight men's double and they're going for gold. At World Cup III in Lucerne they were narrowly beaten on the line by the French double. Just .09 of a second separated the two boats. After their four week training camp in Banyoles they're ready to go again. With four crews to qualify it's likely the Skibbereen boys will bypass the repechage and head straight into the quarterfinals.

Nathan Timoney began rowing with Enniskillen Royal BC in 2015. In his junior years, he represented Ireland at the Coupe de la Jeunesse in the JM2-. Nathan is currently doing a business degree in University Belfast and competing for their rowing team. He was selected for last year's U23 World Championships where he won bronze in the men’s fourNathan Timoney began rowing with Enniskillen Royal BC in 2015. In his junior years, he represented Ireland at the Coupe de la Jeunesse in the JM2-. Nathan is currently doing a business degree in University Belfast and competing for their rowing team. He was selected for last year's U23 World Championships where he won bronze in the men’s four

Nathan Timoney (Queen's University Belfast BC) and Ross Corrigan (Portora BC) race the men's pair tomorrow afternoon. They made their debut in the pair in July at World Cup III, where they finished sixth in the A Final. They have been drawn against Spain in tomorrow's heat, who beat them by less than a second in 8the World Cup final. Again four crews go through to the quarterfinals from the heat.

The men's double of Philip Doyle (Portora BC) and Daire Lynch (Clonmel RC) won bronze in Lucerne and finished in fourth place at the European Championships earlier in the year. The USA double of Benjamin Davison and Sorin Koszyk came second in World Cup II so they're a double to watch but with four crews to qualify for the quarterfinals, Doyle and Lynch are in a good place.

On Monday the women's pair, lightweight double, four, double and the men's four and quad will hit the water for their heats.

Sunday Schedule (IST)
10:08am - LM1x Heat
11:12am - LW1x Heat
11:19am - LM2x Heat
12:01pm - M2- Heat
12:50pm - M2x Heat

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For all you need on the Marine Environment - covering the latest news and updates on marine science and wildlife, weather and climate, power from the sea and Ireland's coastal regions and communities - the place to be is Afloat.ie.

Coastal Notes

The Coastal Notes category covers a broad range of stories, events and developments that have an impact on Ireland's coastal regions and communities, whose lives and livelihoods are directly linked with the sea and Ireland's coastal waters.

Topics covered in Coastal Notes can be as varied as the rare finding of sea-life creatures, an historic shipwreck with secrets to tell, or even a trawler's net caught hauling much more than just fish.

Other angles focusing the attention of Coastal Notes are Ireland's maritime museums, which are of national importance to maintaining access and knowledge of our nautical heritage, and those who harvest the sea using small boats based in harbours where infrastructure and safety pose an issue, plying their trade along the rugged wild western seaboard.

Coastal Notes tells the stories that are arguably as varied as the environment they come from, and which shape people's interaction with the natural world and our relationship with the sea.

Marine Wildlife

One of the greatest memories of any day spent boating around the Irish coast is an encounter with Marine Wildlife. It's a thrill for young and old to witness seabirds, seals, dolphins and whales right there in their own habitat. And as boaters fortunate enough to have experienced it will testify, even spotting a distant dorsal fin can be the highlight of any day afloat. Was that a porpoise? Was it a whale? No matter how brief the glimpse, it's a privilege to share the seas with Irish marine wildlife.

Thanks to our location in the North Atlantic, there appears to be no shortage of marine life to observe. From whales to dolphins, seals, sharks and other ocean animals, the Marine Wildlife category documents the most interesting accounts around our shores. And we're keen to receive your observations, your photos, links and video clips, too!

Also valuable is the unique perspective of all those who go afloat, from coastal sailing to sea angling to inshore kayaking to offshore yacht racing, as what they encounter can be of great importance to organisations such as the Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG). Thanks to their work we now know we share the seas with dozens of species who also call Ireland home. But as impressive as the list is, the experts believe there are still gaps in our knowledge. Next time you are out on the ocean waves, keep a sharp look out!

Weather

As an island in the North Atlantic, Ireland's fate is decided by Weather more so than many other European countries. When storm-force winds race across the Irish Sea, ferry and shipping services are cut off, disrupting our economy. When swollen waves crash on our shores, communities are flooded and fishermen brace for impact - both to their vessels and to their livelihoods.

Keeping abreast of the weather, therefore, is as important to leisure cruisers and fishing crews alike - for whom a small craft warning can mean the difference between life and death - as it is to the communities lining the coast, where timely weather alerts can help protect homes and lives.

Weather affects us all, and Afloat.ie will keep you informed on the hows and the whys.

Marine Science

Perhaps it's the work of the Irish research vessels RV Celtic Explorer and RV Celtic Voyager out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of Marine Science for the future growth of Ireland's emerging 'blue economy'.

From marine research to development and sustainable management, Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. Whether it's Wavebob ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration, the Marine Science category documents the work of Irish marine scientists and researchers and how they have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

Power From The Sea

The message from the experts is clear: offshore wind and wave energy is the future. And as Ireland looks towards the potential of the renewable energy sector, generating Power From The Sea will become a greater priority in the State's 'blue growth' strategy.

Developments and activities in existing and planned projects in the pipeline from the wind and wave renewables sector, and those of the energy exploration industry, point to the future of energy requirements for the whole world, not just in Ireland. And that's not to mention the supplementary industries that sea power projects can support in coastal communities.

Irish ports are already in a good position to capitalise on investments in offshore renewable energy services. And Power From The Sea can even be good for marine wildlife if done properly.

Aside from the green sector, our coastal waters also hold a wealth of oil and gas resources that numerous prospectors are hoping to exploit, even if people in coastal and island areas are as yet unsure of the potential benefits or pitfalls for their communities.

Changing Ocean Climate

Our ocean and climate are inextricably linked - the ocean plays a crucial role in the global climate system in a number of ways. These include absorbing excess heat from the atmosphere and absorbing 30 per cent of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity. But our marine ecosystems are coming under increasing pressure due to climate change.

The Marine Institute, with its national and international partners, works to observe and understand how our ocean is changing and analyses, models and projects the impacts of our changing oceans. Advice and forecasting projections of our changing oceans and climate are essential to create effective policies and management decisions to safeguard our ocean.

Dr Paul Connolly, CEO of the Marine Institute, said, “Our ocean is fundamental to life on earth and affects so many facets of our everyday activities. One of the greatest challenges we face as a society is that of our changing climate. The strong international collaborations that the Marine Institute has built up over decades facilitates a shared focusing on our changing ocean climate and developing new and enhanced ways of monitoring it and tracking changes over time.

“Our knowledge and services help us to observe these patterns of change and identify the steps to safeguard our marine ecosystems for future generations.”

The Marine Institute’s annual ocean climate research survey, which has been running since 2004, facilitates long term monitoring of the deep water environment to the west of Ireland. This repeat survey, which takes place on board RV Celtic Explorer, enables scientists to establish baseline oceanic conditions in Irish waters that can be used as a benchmark for future changes.

Scientists collect data on temperature, salinity, water currents, oxygen and carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean. This high quality oceanographic data contributes to the Atlantic Ocean Observing System. Physical oceanographic data from the survey is submitted to the International Council for the Exploration of the Seas (ICES) and, in addition, the survey contributes to national research such as the VOCAB ocean acidification and biogeochemistry project, the ‘Clean Atlantic’ project on marine litter and the A4 marine climate change project.

Dr Caroline Cusack, who co-ordinates scientific activities on board the RV Celtic Explorer for the annual survey, said, “The generation of long-term series to monitor ocean climate is vital to allow us understand the likely impact of future changes in ocean climate on ecosystems and other marine resources.”

Other activities during the survey in 2019 included the deployment of oceanographic gliders, two Argo floats (Ireland’s contribution to EuroArgo) and four surface drifters (Interreg Atlantic Area Clean Atlantic project). The new Argo floats have the capacity to measure dissolved ocean and biogeochemical parameters from the ocean surface down to a depth of 2,000 metres continuously for up to four years, providing important information as to the health of our oceans.

During the 2019 survey, the RV Celtic Explorer retrieved a string of oceanographic sensors from the deep ocean at an adjacent subsurface moored station and deployed a replacement M6 weather buoy, as part of the Irish Marine Data Buoy Observation Network (IMDBON).

Funded by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, the IMDBON is managed by the Marine Institute in collaboration with Met Éireann and is designed to improve weather forecasts and safety at sea around Ireland. The data buoys have instruments which collect weather and ocean data including wind speed and direction, pressure, air and sea surface temperature and wave statistics. This data provides vital information for weather forecasts, shipping bulletins, gale and swell warnings as well as data for general public information and research.

“It is only in the last 20 years, meteorologists and climatologists have really began to understood the pivotal role the ocean plays in determining our climate and weather,” said Evelyn Cusack, Head of Forecasting at Met Éireann. “The real-time information provided by the Irish data buoy network is particularly important for our mariners and rescue services. The M6 data buoy in the Atlantic provides vital information on swell waves generated by Atlantic storms. Even though the weather and winds may be calm around our shores, there could be some very high swells coming in from Atlantic storms.”