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Displaying items by tag: Dingle

#Coastal Rowing: Myross carried off the senior men’s title at the All-Ireland Coastal Rowing Championships in Dingle. Sneem won the women’s senior title. Kerry club, Workmen’s, did very well in women’s events, as did Kilmacsimon in men’s. Hundreds of crews competed in the event, which was run alongside Dingle Regatta. The Heritage class gave crews from Dublin a chance to shine. The women from St Michael’s and the men from Dalkey won the senior Heritage titles and the mixed title went to Stella Maris.

All Ireland Coastal Rowing Championships (ICRF), Dingle (selected results; winners)

Men

Senior: Myross

Seine Boat: Sneem

Open Classic: Myross.

Heritage, Senior: Dalkey. Inter: Stella Maris. Novice: Sive. Under-18: Valentia.  

Masters: Kilmacsimon Quay

Intermediate: Kilmacsimon Quay

Novice: Templenoe

Junior: Kilmacsimon Quay

Under-21: Callinafercy

Under-18: Templenoe

Women

Senior: Sneem

Heritage Senior: St Michael’s. Under-18: Callinafercy A.

Open Classic: Castletwonbere

Masters: Workmen’s

Novice: Myross

Junior: Fossa

Under-21: Workmen’s

Under-18: Workmen’s A

Mixed

Senior: Workmen’s B

Masters: Templenoe

Heritage: Stella Maris

Published in Coastal Rowing

Dingle Maritime Weekend, an annual event jointly organised by Kevin Flannery of the town’s renowned Oceanworld, and former Harbour Master Captain Brian Farrell (he played a key role in the establishment of the biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race in 1993), will this weekend offer an intriguing range of sea-related topics in a series of talks and inter-active events – all staged in Oceanworld, and all free writes W M Nixon

With the October Bank Holiday just completed, Dingle – which is Europe’s most westerly port – is seeing a slight change of direction, after a festive long weekend in which the noted Dingle hospitality experience, combined with its musical and entertainment traditions, set a light-hearted tone.

The Dingle Maritime Weekend, while not totally in contrast in that it firmly believes in making visitors welcome, adopts a more educational tone, and gets underway at 1400 hrs on Saturday 3rd November with a talk by Daitihi de Mordha, the former Director of The Blasket Centre from Dun Chaoin in the far west of the Dingle Peninsula, on a shipwreck of 1818 which was the cause of much conflict at the time.

Saturday’s programme is completed at 1530 by piracy historian Des Ekin, whose new book on true-life pirate stories from 30 Irish ports might surprise people as they learn of the murky pasts of what are now notably respectable seaside towns and ports all round our coast.

On Sunday the star speaker at 1130 hrs is noted journalist, broadcaster and local historian Ted Creedon, who presentation will be based around the evolution of the Coastguard Service on the Dingle Peninsula, an area so remote from much of Ireland that inevitably they developed their own very effective ways of dealing with special local conditions.

The still-disputed story of a violent event of the distant past is discussed at 1230 by Dr Conor Brosnan, who has worked as a GP in Dingle for 20 years. “The Massacre at Dun an Oir 1580” was a grisly episode at nearby Smerwick Harbour during the Demond Rebellion in November 1580, and it’s an event which has been analysed in many ways, but is always ripe as the topic for a lively discussion.

It also brings the historical side of the Dingle Maritime Weekend agenda to a close, as the final presentation on Sunday afternoon, 4th November at 1530, is very much for children and about our future, though doubtless, adults will find it of much interest. “How to be an Ocean Hero” by Louise Overy is an interactive talk and multi-themed workshop in which she aims at enticing young people into the exciting world of marine science, which - for the Ireland of today and tomorrow and into the years ahead - becomes ever more important.

Dingle Maritime Weekend 3rd-4th November 2018

All events are at Dingle Oceanworld

Saturday 3rd November 14.00 hrs: DAITHI DE MORDHA: “Bad na nGort nDubh 1818 – Tragedy, Conflict and Loss in West Kerry”.
Saturday 3rd November 15630 hrs: DES EKIN: “The Pirate Trails of Ireland”

Sunday November 4th 1130 hrs: TED CREEDON: "The Evolution of the Coastguard of the Dingle Peninsula, 1821-1922”
Sunday November 4th 1230hrs: Dr CONOR BROSNAN: “The Massacre at Dun an Oir, 1580”

Sunday NOVEMBER 4th 1430 hrs: FOR CHILDREN: LOUISE OVERY: “HOW TO BE AN OCEAN HERO”

Published in Maritime Festivals
Tagged under

#Coastguard - The Irish Coast Guard’s Facebook page has shared video of a dramatic cliff face rescue near Dingle earlier this week.

Dingle Coast Guard and the Irish Coast Guard’s Shannon-based helicopter Rescue 115 joined paramedics at the scene where a person has fallen around 10 metres down the cliff face on Monday 30 April.

Rescue climbers from the Dingle coastguard unit were able to reach the causality and transfer them to the helicopter for treatment at University Hospital Kerry.

Video of the rescue was captured from the water by Jeannine Masset, a longtime fan of Dingle’s resident dolphin Fungie.

Published in Coastguard
Tagged under

#MarineNotice - Dredging works were set to commence this week at Dingle Fishery Harbour Centre and are expected to be ongoing until the end of February 2018.

The works will involve the dredging of the north/south section of the main navigation channel and an area between the breakwaters off the main quay head.

The vessel Grete Fighter (Callsign: OZLP2) and the jack-up barge Yo Yo will be onsite and will maintain a VHF watch on Channel 16/14.

Three Special Mark (monitoring buoy) Fl Y 2s will be in positions 150 meters east, west and south of the north/south channel within the fishery harbour centre.

The Grete Fighter will be transiting to an approved dumpsite east of Beenban Head marked by four special marks.

Port hand marks and leading lights will be affected during the course of the works.

For safety reasons, mariners are requested to proceed slowly and with caution when in the vicinity of the dredging vessels in the fishery harbour centre and to give the works a wide berth.

Contact details and co-ordinates of the dump area are included in Marine Notice No 53 of 2017, a PDF of which is available to read or download HERE.

Published in Fishing

Dingle today is closely associated with superb hospitality, good food, the sporting entertainment of the biennial Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race, and the eternal sense of the nearby presence of the mighty Atlantic in one direction, and majestic mountains soaring to the peak of Mount Brandon in the other. Thus it is easy to overlook the fact that this remote yet spirited and independent port has a long history of interacting with the sea for fishing, international trade, and other intriguing activities writes W M Nixon.

The annual Dingle Maritime Weekend in the October Bank Holiday Weekend has been running for six years now to increase awareness of Dingle’s often colourful maritime past. It was established by Kevin Flannery of Dingle Oceanworld and former Harbour Master Captain Brian Farrell (whose tour of duty did so much to bring the harbour to its present healthy state), and the idea is to exlore aspects of that rich heritage, and how it relates to Dingle’s fascinating maritime environment today.

 

dingle poster final2

It’s held at the Oceanworld Aquarium and admission is free for three special talks spread in civilized style between the Saturday afternoon and early Sunday afternoon. Thus it’s a user-friendly format which means you can combine the usual multi-activity Dingle holiday weekend with some digestible maritime information. But of course with the varied audience which it usually attracts, all sorts of post-presentation conversations can happily arise. 

Dingle Maritime Weekend Programme, 28th and 29th October 2017 at Oceanworld Aquarium

SATURDAY 28th OCTOBER 14:00hrs

'The coast of Kerry in the 16th and 17th centuries: trade, ships, piracy and plunder.'
by Dr Connie Kelleher

The talk will draw on sources such as the High Court of Admiralty Papers, State Papers and other contemporary sources to illustrate episodes when the expansion of maritime empires meant that the diversity of goods traded encouraged smuggling, piracy and corruption. It will show that harbours like Dingle, Ventry and Valentia, rather than being remote, formed part of a network central to this global development in commercial shipping, colonial enlargement and associated growth in opportunistic plunder.

DR CONNIE HELLEHER is a member of the State Underwater Archeology Unit in the National Monuments Service Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht. Connie is a graduate of UCC with an MA in maritime archaeology and a PhD from Trinity College Dublin on the history and archaeology of piracy in Irish waters in the early 17th century. As a commercially trained diver, her work with the NMS is broad and focuses on the protection of Ireland's underwater cultural heritage. She is visiting lecturer in underwater archaeology in the Archaeology Dept UCC and is a Board member of the international advisory council on underwater archaeology. With several papers and chapters published on piracy in Irish waters, she is currently putting the final edit to her book: “Ireland's Golden Age of Piracy”.

SATURDAY 15:30 hrs
Irish Antarctic Expedition.

PADDY BARRY will give an illustrated talk on the Irish Antarctic Expedition which followed the survival route of Shackleton & Tom Crean by sea in a small boat and then over the mountains of South Georgia.

tom crean3The national hero from the Dingle Peninsula – Tom Crean in the Antarctic.

Tom Crean came from Annascaul on the Tralee to Dingle road, and is one of the Dingle Peninsula’s most internationally-noted historic figures (another is film star Gregory Peck).

Paddy Barry is a Civil Engineer, now retired, who has, during his working life, taken many 'career breaks' to sail to out of the way places, while at the same time somehow maintaining domestic relations on the home front. He lives in Monkstown, Dublin and has worked, apart from Ireland, in the UK, the USA, Malawi and Ethiopia. His first 'big' trip was to America, in the Galway Hooker ' Saint Patrick', followed in the same boat by journeys to Spitsbergen and later to North West Greenland.

paddy barry4High latitudes voyager and explorer Paddy Barry will celebrate the Dingle Peninsula’s links to Tom Crean

In a very much smaller boat he was Skipper of the Irish Antarctic team which followed in the wake of Shackleton's small boat journey. In 2001 he was Expedition Leader of the team who traversed the North West Passage in the vessel 'Northabout'.

Paddy in his sailing boat Ar Seachrán escorted Camino Thar Sáile on its first year of voyaging across the Irish Sea and the Channel to Europe.

Paddy’s talk will be followed by the Kerry Launch of his newly published autobiography, “So Far, So Good – An Adventurous Life”. Available to purchase here.

SUNDAY 29th October 12:30hrs

Smuggling in Dingle in the Eighteenth Century
Speaker Dr Conor Brosnan

DR CONOR BROSNAN will discuss smuggling in Dingle in the eighteenth century. He will explore the reasons, sources, methods and people involved in what was known as Free Trade. He will talk on the methods the authorities used to suppress smuggling and the legacy it left.

Dr Conor Brosnan is a local GP and a member of Dingle Historical Society. He has a deep interest and knowledge of the Dingle area and its history.

Published in Maritime Festivals

#MarineNotice - Site investigation works are being carried out at Dingle/An Daingean Fishery Harbour Centre in Co Kerry, according to the latest Marine Notice from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport.

The works involve the drilling of multiple boreholes at locations, subject to minor variations, as indicated by the co-ordinates and map included in Marine Notice No 37 of 2016, a PDF of which is available to read or download HERE.

Drilling was expected to begin yesterday (Monday 5 September) and will finish on or around Friday 28 October, weather permitting.

A jack-up barge will be moved to the various borehole locations by the tug Samson (Callsign ZQVL6) and will remain on site overnight during the operations.

All appropriate lights will be displayed by the barge at night. Radio navigation warnings will be transmitted on VHF Channel 16 throughout the works.

Published in Irish Harbours

#Fungie - Dingle's resident dolphin Fungie has sustained a significant wound below his dorsal fin, as the Irish Examiner reports.

The deep cut, likely inflicted by a visiting boat's propeller, was noticed yesterday (Friday 3 June) by fans of the popular marine wildlife attraction who's delighted locals and visitors alike in Dingle for more than 30 years.

However, Fungie lovers have been urged not to panic – as the famous bottlenose has healed well from similar injuries before, and has already returned to frolicking with boaters in Dingle Harbour.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife

#Surfing - A new documentary following two American descendants of the 'King of the Blaskets' as they surf the waves of their ancestral homeland will have its world premiere in Dingle next weekend.

The Crest will be screened as part of an eclectic programme at the Dingle International Film Festival at 6pm on Saturday 19 March at the Blasket Centre (Ionad an Bhlascaoid Mhóir), and again on Sunday 20 March at 2pm in the Phoenix Cinema.

Directed by Mark Covino, whose last film was the award-winning music documentary A Band Called Death, The Crest follows the exploits of cousins Andrew Jacob and Dennis 'DK' Kane as they trace their shared ancestry back to the Blasket Islands.

A rare stronghold of traditional Irish culture over the centuries, the rocky island chain is where their great great grandfather once presided as 'An Rí' - the king of the islands.

One of his responsibilities to the isolated community was to row the treacherous Atlantic seas to the mainland on the Dingle Peninsula for supplies.

His was a seaworthiness that seems to have carried on through the generations, as both Jacob and Kane are surfing enthusiasts to the professional level.

It's only natural, then, that they would explore their bloodline by putting themselves in their regal ancestor's shoes – or rather waters.

See the trailer for The Crest below:

Published in Surfing

#MarineNotice - The latest Marine Notice from the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (DTTAS) advises that a wave measuring device has been installed on the seabed at Dingle Fishery Harbour Centre.

The wave study is being carried out by the Marine Engineering Division of the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine and is expected to be ongoing until early September 2015, weather permitting.

For safety reasons, mariners are requested to keep a sharp lookout and to proceed slowly and with extreme caution in this vicinity. Fishermen are requested to take great care when dredging near the location of the device and keep a wide berth.

A yellow floating marker buoy with a special mark beacon has been installed to indicate the location of the device. A photograph of what the buoy looks like in the water and the co-ordinates of its placement are included in Marine Notice No 29 of 2015, a PDF of which is available to read or download HERE.

Published in Marine Warning

#D2D –  When the crew of Anthony O'Leary's Antix began collating weather predictions at mid-week for the approaching Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race writes W M Nixon, they found themselves in the happy position of being told on Thursday that when the wind expectations were combined with the boat's known performance capabilities, they might be looking at breaking the 24 hours for the dash to Dingle.

Quite. As of 1600 hours this afternoon (Saturday June 13th), we're looking at the dribble to Dingle. The two leaders – Lee Overlay Partners and Antix – are within a couple of miles of each other well seaward off Cork Harbour, and making a less-than-stellar two to four knots while turning slowly to windward in a local sou'westerly.

Antix continues to lead the fleet on handicap while Lee OP is eighth in IRC. But when things get as slow as this, the little guys somewhere astern are making hay just sitting still, so the lead which Antix has held virtually from the start could easily evaporate.

However, this year the boat has had her performance maximized for lighter conditions, so the slightest little bite to the breeze could see her getting ahead of Lee OP and holding on to her overall lead. That said, if the underlying northerly comes in again after the day's sea breeze effect has waned along the Cork coast, the Cookson 50 could be back in business.

Twenty-two miles astern, as of time of writing George Sisk's Farr 42 Wow is next in line, churning merrily along on course in a private breeze at better than 4 knots, while her closest contender, the Power Smiths' J/122 Aurelia, has lost most of her wind after an excellent race until now, and is headed off almost to a southerly course, while barely registering one knot.

Mike Murphy's characterful twin-ruddered JPK 9.60 Alchimiste continues to have a cracker of a race, lying second on IRC after Antix, but like the leader now obliged to turn to windward as the summer sou'wester works its way along the coast.

Colm Buckley and Simon Knowles have been putting in an impressive performance in the two-handed division which they lead by quite a margin with the Elan 340 Blue Eyes, on top of which they're lying eight overall in IRC, and have many larger fully crewed boats well astern of them on the water.

rev2.jpg
Captains Cool.....Colm Buckley and Simon Knowles with the Elan 340 Blue Eyes knew that it would be a mistake to mix it with the rest of the fleet in the thick of a potentially messy start, so they held back and started with room to spare........Photo: W M Nixon

rev3.jpg
.....but soon Blue Eyes was in perfect trim and going well, and already had closest two-handed rival Joker (David Gibbons) put in place astern. Photo: W M Nixon

They've done well sailing two-handed in the Dingle Race before, and at last night's inevitably messy running start, it was noted that the two guys stayed well out of the crowd to make a very conservative start. Yet they soon had themselves up and running in good order with spinnaker setting perfectly, picking off one boat after another until by the time the fleet was off the Wicklow coast, they were comfortably leading the two-handed division, and were even in the frame in the fully-crewed sector.

Signing off, it's noted that Lee OP and Antix are back on course for the Old Head of Kinsale and making better than four knots, but whether this is a temporary breeze or a return of the overall slack northerly remains to be seen. Either way, we won't be seeing a new course record with D2D 2015. But although tomorrow may seem some local southwest winds, the gradient is not expected to draw properly from the south until Monday afternoon, by which time everyone should be long since finished.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle
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Marine Science Perhaps it is the work of the Irish research vessel RV Celtic Explorer out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of marine research, development and sustainable management, through which Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. From Wavebob Ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration these pages document the work of Irish marine science and how Irish scientists have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

 

At A Glance – Ocean Facts

  • 71% of the earth’s surface is covered by the ocean
  • The ocean is responsible for the water cycle, which affects our weather
  • The ocean absorbs 30% of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity
  • The real map of Ireland has a seabed territory ten times the size of its land area
  • The ocean is the support system of our planet.
  • Over half of the oxygen we breathe was produced in the ocean
  • The global market for seaweed is valued at approximately €5.4 billion
  • · Coral reefs are among the oldest ecosystems in the world — at 230 million years
  • 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast in Ireland
  • Ocean waters hold nearly 20 million tons of gold. If we could mine all of the gold from the ocean, we would have enough to give every person on earth 9lbs of the precious metal!
  • Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world – Ireland is ranked 7th largest aquaculture producer in the EU
  • The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean in the world, covering 20% of the earth’s surface. Out of all the oceans, the Atlantic Ocean is the saltiest
  • The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean in the world. It’s bigger than all the continents put together
  • Ireland is surrounded by some of the most productive fishing grounds in Europe, with Irish commercial fish landings worth around €200 million annually
  • 97% of the earth’s water is in the ocean
  • The ocean provides the greatest amount of the world’s protein consumed by humans
  • Plastic affects 700 species in the oceans from plankton to whales.
  • Only 10% of the oceans have been explored.
  • 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year, equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic into the ocean every minute.
  • 12 humans have walked on the moon but only 3 humans have been to the deepest part of the ocean.

(Ref: Marine Institute)

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