Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

Displaying items by tag: Frostbite

#dmycfrostbites – With both XCWeather and Windfinder forecasts suggesting similar conditions for 15:00, northerly winds of 20 knots with gust to 27/28 knots, air temperatures of 5/6˚, but, ironically sunny conditions, the organisers of today's DMYC Frostbites pulled the plug on the Dun Laoghaire dinghy racing series writes Cormac BradleyN over A flies from the DMYC flagpole for yet another week!

Published in Dublin Bay

#fireball – Irish National Fireball Champions, Barry McCartin & Conor Kinsella (IRL15114) made their Frostbite debut in Dun Laoghaire yesterday and utterly dominated proceedings, leading from start to finish and putting three-quarters of a lap between themselves and the chasing pack at the finish writes Cormac Bradley.

Eight Fireballs initiated Series 2 of the Frostbites, hosted by Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club and they enjoyed lighter and more fickle conditions than were forecast for the day. The Windfinder app was suggesting 12 knots of SSW, but the weather station adjacent to my observation position suggested that the base wind strength was around 6 knots with a highest recorded gust of 10 knots and a direction of 162˚. The air temperatures of the two systems – app and weather station – were consistent at 7˚. Still, after a gap of five weeks, with the last three Sundays of Series 1 lost to adverse weather, the fleet would have enjoyed being on the water in any conditions.   

Again, I missed the start (New Year’s resolution – get there on time!) and arrived as a cluster of Fireballs rounded the first weather mark. Even after a single beat, McCartin & Kinsella had some distance on the fleet. They were followed by Alistair Court & Gordon Syme (IRL 14706), Noel Butler & Stephen Oram (IRL 15061) and Neil Colin & Margaret Casey (IRL 14775). A trapezoid course was the order of the day with a long beat and a shorter top leg between 1 and 2. The weather mark was set just off the ferry gantry with the committee boat anchored off the west pier.

For the second beat, McCartin & Kinsella took a short port tack hitch before setting off on a long starboard leg to the weather mark. What appeared to be a healthy lead on the water as they approached the mark seemed to evaporate, but it was an illusion because on time they were 45 seconds up on the next boat.  Court & Syme were still in second place, followed closely by Louise McKenna & Joe O’Reilly (IRL 14691), with Colin & Casey, Butler & Oram, Frank Miller (IRL 14713), Louis Smyth & Glen Fisher (IRL 15007) and Mary Chambers & Brenda McGuire (IRL 14865) following on.

The leg between 1 and 2 stayed as a tight reach throughout the race and the bottom leg, 3 to 4 was likewise tight but the leg between 2 and 3 saw two different approaches being taken, continue on starboard tack towards the harbour mouth, or gybe and sail a slightly higher line to Mark 3. At Mark 4 the second time the fleet compacted, with the exception of the leaders who at this stage were in a “world of their own”. The tactic now appeared to be to tack earlier rather than later as the boats which went too far left found themselves in lesser breeze.

At Mark 1 for the third time, the lead was out to 2 minutes, the length of the leg between 1 and 2. The chasing pack seemed to have an established order with the sequence being Butler, Court, Colin, McKenna, Smyth, Chambers & Miller. However, for the balance of the race this group of seven had a persistent game of snakes and ladders before the finishing order was confirmed.

There were two elements to the beat now – stay in breeze and stay on starboard tack for as long as possible, taking the port hitch when the wind allowed. This meant that the fleet generally stayed inside the box created by the four marks of the course.

At the next rounding of the weather mark the sequence, apart from the leaders, who now had a two leg lead, was Colin, Butler, McKenna, Court, Miller, Chambers, Smyth.  However, at Mark 3 they compacted again and in the process Chambers had the “door shut” on her, forcing her to drop spinnaker and tack to round the mark.

By the next rounding of the weather mark, Colin had got ahead of Butler, but his approach to the mark was interrupted by starboard tacked boats approaching the same mark. This allowed Butler to close but not pass Colin. McKenna and Court also rounded in close company followed by Smyth, Miller and Chambers, now slightly adrift due to her travails at the previous rounding of mark 3.  By mark 2, Butler had taken Colin.

As the afternoon progressed, staying in wind became the primary challenge. On the last lap, Colin sailed on past mark 2 even though both McKenna and Court who had gybed at mark 2 seemed to have gained the upper hand on the water by this manoeuvre. However, he managed to sail “a circle route” to 3 and by staying in better breeze got his third place back again.

DMYC Frostbites 2014/15: Series 2, Round 1; 4th January 2015.

1

Barry McCartin & Conor Kinsella

15114

RStGYC

2

Noel Butler & Stephen Oram

15061

NYC & DMYC

3

Neil Colin & Margaret Casey

14775

DMYC

4

Louise McKenna & Joe O’Reilly

14691

RStGYC

5

Alistair Court & Gordon Syme

14706

DMYC

This result gave Barry & Conor the day’s Frostbite Mugs.

The DMYC clubhouse also hosted the prizegiving for Series 1 which had not taken place in December due to the last three races being abandoned due to adverse weather. DMYC Calendars were the prizes for the Series.

DMYC Frostbites 2014/15: Series 1, Overall (No discards).

Pts.

1

Kenny Rumball & Brian Byrne

15058

Irish National Sailing Club

5pts

2

Noel Butler & Stephen Oram

15061

National Yacht Club &

Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club

17pts

3

Conor & James Clancy

15113

Royal St. George Yacht Club

21pts

Kenny Rumball was not in attendance to receive his prize as he was in Australia returning the boat in which he finished seventh in Class and 12th overall (IRC) in the 2014 Rolex Sydney to Hobart Race. He raced with two other Irish sailors with strong Fireball connections – Barry Hurley and Kenny’s younger brother Alexander.

In other Irish Fireball related news, Conor Byrne was in 25th overall, after two races, in a fleet of 124 Tasars at their World Championships in Australia. Two other Fireball “connections” are also in action at this event; Chris Payne & Heather McFarlane were 15th overall after the same two races (and they won the Practice Race) and Ben Schulz was lying in 35th overall. 

Published in Fireball
Tagged under

#frostbites – After the baptism of fire from the morning's DBSC Turkey Shoot racing series, it was never a sure thing that the DMYC Frostbite Series would go ahead writes Kenneth Rumball. As predicted at approximately 12:15 the code flags N over A were hoisted above the DMYC on the West Pier in Dun Laoghaire. However a number of the younger sailors from the Irish National Sailing School had already gathered in the INSS Clubhouse and were keen to get out sailing after seeing the performance of their coaches in the breeze on the previous week. Knowing the condition from the morning racing, INSS manager Kenneth Rumball assisted by Glyn Williams and Alexander Rumball allowed the 9 keen young sailors to take out three squibs with a reef in to practise their starts and do a few short races inside the harbour.

Motoring out in the INSS launch which was to act as a committee boat for the day, there were a number of Laser Dinghies out sailing and also Shane McCarthy in his Solo dinghy despite the frostbite series being cancelled. In all there were 8 Lasers and the Solo. With Kenneth already planning on setting up a triangular course, and holding races for the Squibs, we invited the Lasers and the Solo to a separate start where we ran three races for the gang. Kenneth even jumped into the Solo for race number three to get a taste for the single-hander.

Our juniors in the Squib fleet used the conditions to build on their starting techniques which they have been struggling with in the PY class of the Frostbite series. The three boats crewed by three persons each soon shook out the reefs after conditions in the harbour were considerable more tame than the Turkey Shoot in the morning. Lorcan Tighe and his gang were dominant in the squibs, notching up three wins!

Sean Craig was consistently at the front if not helped slightly by his enthusiastic starting attitude. Great racing inside the harbour for the gang with lots of photos available on the INSS Facebook page here

Sail No. Race 1 Race 2 Race 3 Race 4 Cumulative
188347 1 4 1 2 8
171694 2 1 3 5 11
5302 6 5 2 1 14
200143 5 2 4 3 14
190317 7 3 5 4 19
177854 4 7 6 6 23
190745 3 6 7 9 25
165639 9 8 8 7 32
177891 8 9 9 8 34

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

#frostbites – For the second Sunday in succession DMYC frostbites was cancelled due to strong winds. 

N over A is flying from the DMYC flagpole (at 12:32) with a confirming Facebook post that Frostbite racing is cancelled again - too gusty writes Cormac Bradley.

Contrary to my report last week, there is racing on the programme next Sunday - as advised/confirmed in the NoR and SI.

But for today there will be no water borne action!!

From my office view Dublin Bay is deceptive - it is an offshore breeze so the water is flat, but there are "catspaws" of harder wind skirting across the water. Further out there are whitecaps though they are not particularly big. XCWeather had been forecasting 16 knots with gusts in the mid-twenties.

It is a bright day with grey clouds over this part of the Bay with a brighter skyline to the north and east. A rainbow has just appeared over Poolbeg to the West!

TV time then? Scarlets v Ulster in Champions Cup Rugby or Utd v Liverpool in the Premier League!!

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

#fireballsailing – Seven Fireballers headed out to the bay on Sunday afternoon for race 5 of the DMYC Frostbite series, a race in the bay gave the fireballs a chance to stretch their legs on a longer course but with the spring tides in play, some tidal calculations were needed at all the turning marks of the course. Watching the PY fleet start before, it was clear a conservative start was needed and after waiting for our turn, all seven fireballs got away cleanly with no OCSs to mention, a rare time with Irish Fireballers.

Given the shifty conditions, the first beat was almost a fetch to the weather mark and most of the fleet tacked on to port almost instantly after the start, the Clancy brothers 15113 mastered the start line and took a dominant role on the left handside of the fleet. Neil Colin and Margaret Casey 14775 went out towards the right hand side while most of the fleet kept towards the middle of the course.

At the top mark, the Clancy brothers had held their lead and rounded first, followed by Colin/Casey, then Rumball/Byrne 15058 followed hot by Butler/Oram 15061. A quick hoist saw Rumball/Byrne overtake Colin/Casey on the top reach and then set off in hot pursuit of the Clancy brothers. By the first gybe mark of the trapezoid the Clancy brother still held their lead. Up the next beat Rumball/Byrne had closed the gap while Butler/Oram had managed to overtake Colin/Casey.

Round two of the course saw some good match racing between Rumball/Byrne and the Clancy brothers with Rumball/Byrne only managing to gain first place on the next upwind leg. The race continued with little place changing from here on as far as this writer can tell.

The finishing order is below with mug winners on the day of Louise McKenna & Hermine O'Keefe.

1. Kenneth Rumball Brian Byrne

2. Conor Clancy/James Clancy

3. Noel Butler/Stephen Oram

4. Luke Malcolm/Harry O'Reilly

5. Louise McKenna/Hermine O'Keefe

6. Neil Colin/Margaret Casey

7. Mary Chambers/ Brenda Mcguire

Published in Fireball
Tagged under

#fireball – The third Sunday of the 2014/15 Frostbite Series saw the fleet break out of the constraints of Dun Laoghaire harbour and race offshore yesterday writes Cormac Bradley. My interaction with the fleet afterwards suggests that the dominant feature of the day was the big sea running outside the harbour, which combined with a light-ish breeze, gave everyone a bit of a challenge.
A five lap trapezoid course was set with a separate weather mark for the Fireball fleet. My contacts also suggested that there was a lot of place changing going in the bottom half of the fleet, but couldn't offer a "blow by blow" account of what was going on ahead of them.
However, I was told that for the second week in a row, a member of the fairer sex became detached from her boat and had to be rescued by her (female) crew. Well done Hermine! The previous week, in zero wind, another all lady team capsized while they floated around waiting for the wind to fill in..........which it never did. Oops, Mary & Brenda!
As I was not present to watch the racing and with it being offshore I might have had difficulty anyway, a detailed account of the racing is not available! Apologies!
However, I can surmise that with a finishing order of;
1. Kenneth Rumball & Brian Byrne INSC 15058
2. Conor & James Clancy RStGYC 15113 (adopted number)
3. Noel Butler & Stephen Oram NYC 15061
There would have been lots of fun and games at the front end of the fleet. Neil Colin admitted to being asleep at the start with his watch being a minute out, so he and Margaret (14775) spent the rest of the race catching up.
Alistair Court & Gordon Syme were pleased to find that their efforts had resulted in a 4th place finish.
With Rumball & Byrne also winning the first round race, yesterday's Frostbite Mugs went to the Clancy Brothers.
Irish Fireballers are reminded that the Class Prize-giving takes place on the last Friday of November, the 28th, in the National Yacht Club. In addition to awarding prizes for the season-long Traveller's Trophy, there are a number of Class Awards to be handed out – The Asterix Trophy, The India Trophy, The Captain's Trophy, The Lady's Trophy & The Liam Bradley Trophy. It is also an evening where the season-long post-mortems take place.
Hope to see you there! Please let a committee member know if you will be in attendance

Published in Fireball
Tagged under

#lasersailing – Thirty seasoned Laser sailors were greeted with a Westerly at 8knots at Howth Yacht Club for the second race of the 40th Laser winter series, slightly calmer conditions than last week! The Race Committee had their work cut out for them as both the wind and fleet were making things difficult.

After a General Recall, the fluctuating wind delayed the restart and eventually stabilized from a SW direction. Taking no prisoners, the RC went with a Black flag and needless to say managed to catch one over the line early! Half of the fleet went left and the other right. Things started to get tricky at the top mark with the boats from the right just edging out those from the left. A bunch that included Daragh Kelleher, Ian McSweeney, Oliver Keenan, Ronan Cull, Dave Quinn and Mike Evans all rounded in quick succession. Those who stayed to the left of the run or up tide managed to make some good gains and round the LW mark in good position. Sailors jockeyed for position throughout the race as picking up the little puffs and shifts on the beat made for tight tactical racing.

Ronan Cull was the one and only sailor falling foul of the Black Flag, leaving Dave Quinn to take the bullet ahead of Oliver Keenan.

Race 2 got underway in lighter conditions after the wind veered back to the West. A clean start this time, and a last minute right hand shift biased the committee boat for the start. Some boats headed left, but the leaders came in from the mid-right once again! Dave Quinn and Troy Hopkins took the lead around the WW mark with the fleet in hot pursuit. Darrell Reamsbottom showed some great pace on the light air reaches to pull up to third by the Leeward mark, and eventually climbed to first early on into the second beat.

Heart Rates began to rise as the Race Committee shortened the course and sailors could see the finish line at the WW mark. The three boats left of centre were looking pretty good until Darragh Sheridan put in a "Brilliant Performance" (best of luck Daragh with the new book) on the last beat to throw the cat amongst the pigeons leading a bunch of boats in from the right in slightly better breeze. The wind died in the final third of the beat, and Ronan Cull showed good speed in the home straight to take the win. Closely followed by Oliver, Daragh, Darrell and Dave, who were only separated by a mere boatlength on the finish line.

Race 1 - Standard fleet:

1. Dave Quinn

2. Oliver Keenan

3. Ian McSweeney

4. Darrell Reamsbottom

5. Darragh Kelleher

Race 2 - Standard fleet

1. Ronan Cull

2. Oliver Keenan

3. Daragh Sheridan

4. Darrell Reamsbottom

5. Dave Quinn

Published in Laser

#frostbites – Dun Laoghaire harbour was quite a soggy scene when a downpour hit the DMYC Frostbite fleet just before the scheduled start of proceedings and whatever wind there might have been was killed off shortly thereafter writes Cormac Bradley.
From a waterside location, just on the seaward side of the Dun Laoghaire marina, the committee boat started off at the mouth of the harbour and progressively moved inshore until it was just to the west of the gantry for the HSS ferry. A substantial fleet of Lasers, RSs, IDRAs and nine Fireballs floated around the committee boat until, just after 14:30, three blasts of the starter's horn brought proceedings to a close.
By that stage the atmosphere was starting to improve, the rain had disappeared off to sea but stillness descended to replace it. The air temperature wasn't bad at 10˚, but the fleet would have a long sail home.

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

#dmyc – Online entry for the popular and long running DMYC dinghy frostbite series is now open. Racing in the for 2014 - 2015 series will take place each Sunday on Dublin Bay or inside Dun Laoghaire Harbour from 2nd November 2014 right through to 22nd March 2015.

First gun is at 1357 hours, and classes will include PY, Laser, RS (200 & 400), and Fireballs.

The DMYC says entries are limited to 120 maximum on a first come first served basis!

View the NOR and enter online here

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

#Laser - The final weekend of the Dun Laoghaire Laser Frostbite was a real cracker, as the high winds of the morning moderated around midday and the sun came out.

The race officer set his usual trapezoid with the windward mark just off the west pier, making for a shifty last third of the beat, and the 16 Lasers that made the start looked forward to a longer than usual five-lap race.

The pin end was marginally favoured, and the beat was a little one-sided, meaning that most boats soon tacked onto port for the long fetch across the harbour.

The fleet sailed hard up the first beat, hiking in a way that you only ever see on the last weekend of a series. At the windward mark it was Richard Harding who managed to nip round first ahead of Dwyer and a significant group containing David Cahill, Graham Elmes and Alan Hodgins. 

The first reach was tight and gusty, and the bear away at the end was dangerous. Harding led down the first run with Elmes and then Cahill threatening. At the leeward mark it was Harding from Cahill and Elmes.

The wind remained shifty and there were opportunities to make ground if you could pick the right spot to take the short hike across on starboard, but the large part of the upwind section involved thrashing though the short chop at the entrance to the harbour.

At the front Harding gradually extended from Cahill. Elmes and Hodgins had a close battle for a couple of laps with Elmes finally getting the jump on Hodgins.

From a series perspective, Harding needed to take two points from Cahill to take overall honours. But although Elmes threatened, he never quite got onto the transom of Cahill, who sailed hard to retain his second place in the final race, and win the Frostbite Series overall by one point from Harding.

At the prize giving there was general agreement that the Frostbite had been a great success. All those involved, from the race officer to the safety crews to the bar staff at the DMYC were warmly thanked for all the hard work that they had put in to making the event such a success.

Published in Laser
Tagged under
Page 4 of 7

Marine Science Perhaps it is the work of the Irish research vessel RV Celtic Explorer out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of marine research, development and sustainable management, through which Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. From Wavebob Ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration these pages document the work of Irish marine science and how Irish scientists have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

 

At A Glance – Ocean Facts

  • 71% of the earth’s surface is covered by the ocean
  • The ocean is responsible for the water cycle, which affects our weather
  • The ocean absorbs 30% of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity
  • The real map of Ireland has a seabed territory ten times the size of its land area
  • The ocean is the support system of our planet.
  • Over half of the oxygen we breathe was produced in the ocean
  • The global market for seaweed is valued at approximately €5.4 billion
  • · Coral reefs are among the oldest ecosystems in the world — at 230 million years
  • 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast in Ireland
  • Ocean waters hold nearly 20 million tons of gold. If we could mine all of the gold from the ocean, we would have enough to give every person on earth 9lbs of the precious metal!
  • Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world – Ireland is ranked 7th largest aquaculture producer in the EU
  • The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean in the world, covering 20% of the earth’s surface. Out of all the oceans, the Atlantic Ocean is the saltiest
  • The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean in the world. It’s bigger than all the continents put together
  • Ireland is surrounded by some of the most productive fishing grounds in Europe, with Irish commercial fish landings worth around €200 million annually
  • 97% of the earth’s water is in the ocean
  • The ocean provides the greatest amount of the world’s protein consumed by humans
  • Plastic affects 700 species in the oceans from plankton to whales.
  • Only 10% of the oceans have been explored.
  • 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year, equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic into the ocean every minute.
  • 12 humans have walked on the moon but only 3 humans have been to the deepest part of the ocean.

(Ref: Marine Institute)

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Car Brands

subaru sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton dob
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton

quantum sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
sellingboat sidebutton

Please show your support for Afloat by donating