Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Marine Institute Banner Advert

Displaying items by tag: Royal Canal

Waterways Ireland advises that site investigation works will take place on the Royal Canal towpath east of Phibsborough until next Wednesday 10 March.

These investigate works have been classified as critical infrastructure works so they will continue over the current period of increased COVID-19 restrictions.

The towpath will remain open but Waterways Ireland says users should exercise due care and caution when passing any vehicles or plant machinery along the path.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland notifies towpath users that sections of the towpath on the Lough Owel feeder of the Royal Canal from Mullingar Harbour to Fish Farm at Cullion will be closed periodically from today, Monday 8 February, until Friday 19 February for essential maintenance works.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises towpath users that site investigation works have commenced on the Royal Canal towpath between Phibsborough and Ashtown and will continue until March 2021.

Dublin City Council have classified these as part of critical infrastructure works so they will also continue over the current period of increased Covid-19 restrictions.

The towpath will remain open but users should exercise due care and caution when passing any vehicles or plant machinery along the path.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises users of the Royal Canal in Dublin that there will be no boat passages possible on the inland waterway at the 12th Lock in Castleknock from Monday 7 December until the end of January due to works to replace a breast gate at the lock.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises users of the Royal Canal between Leixlip and Maynooth in Co Kildare that there will be no boat passages permitted from next Monday 23 November until the end of January 2021 due to deep gate replacement and associated works on Lock 13 at Deey Bridge.

Published in Inland Waterways

Refurbishment of the Longford Canal and the extension of the Grand Canal Greenway from Daingean to Edenderry are two of the projects that will be funded from a €63.5m allocation for greenways in 2021.

Transport Minister Eamon Ryan and Minister of State Hildegarde Naughton today (Monday 9 November) confirmed the funding for a range of greenways across the country.

Minister Ryan said the funding “is the highest single year amount ever allocated to greenways”.

“Indeed, it nearly equals the total amount originally allocated for the four years 2018-2021 (€53m) and shows the commitment of this Government to providing a step-change in the way in which we fund walking and cycling,” he said.

Among the inland waterways projects in the list is the €172,000 refurbishment of the Longford Canal spur of the Royal Canal, with improved infrastructure being provided along its cycleway.

In Co Offaly, €3.1 million has been allocated to fund the extension of the Grand Canal Greenway from Daingean to Edenderry, with another €1.66 million for the stretch between Daingean and Lough Boora, west of Tullamore.

“By the end of next year it will be possible to cycle the greenway the whole way from Edenderry to Lough Boora, over 50km worth of cycleway,” Minister Ryan said.

Minister Naughton added that a new greenway bridge across the River Shannon in Athlone would be funded from a €8.1 million allocation to the Galway-to-Dublin Greenway.

Published in Inland Waterways

Owners of boats without permits on the Barrow Line of the Grand Canal and the Barrow Navigation face the removal of their vessels by Waterways Ireland later this month.

They are among the boats in contravention of bye-laws that will be taken from these inland waterways from Monday 26 October.

Others include vessels that appear abandoned, are double moored and/or causing obstruction (sunk) or are deemed to be or likely to cause a hazard to navigation, as per the Canal Act 1986 (Bye-Laws) 1988.

Owners of boats on the Royal Canal have been similarly advised of plans to remove non-permitted, abandoned or obstructing vessels from Monday 9 November.

Similar to last month’s planned boat removal on the Grand Canal, affected vessels have been stickered with warning notices, given suitable access, and owners — where known — have been contacted, Waterways Ireland says.

This story was updated on Wednesday 14 November with additional details about Royal Canal boat removals.

Published in Inland Waterways

Navigation in or out of the Dublin on the Royal Canal is currently suspended until the completion of works on three separate lock gates.

Waterways Ireland says repair and upgrading works are required at Lock 12 in Castleknock, Lock 10 in Ashtown and the Spencer Dock Sea Lock.

Passage through the city on the Northside inland waterway will remain closed until such time as these works are completed and the locks are again operational.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters and users of the Royal Canal that canoe polo events will take place in the vicinity of the harbour in Mullingar this weekend, 27-28 September and the following Sunday, 4 October.

Boat movements in the area will be restricted on the inland waterway for the duration of the events. Masters of vessels should navigate the area with caution and comply with guidance from marshals.

Further information may be obtained from Mullingar Harbour Canoe Polo at 086 244 62 20.

Published in Watersport

Waterways Ireland advises that emergency works on the Royal Canal embankment in Westmeath will continue until the end of this month.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the inland waterway between the 34th and 35th locks, at Balroe and Ballynacarrigy respectively, was closed for emergency repairs following poor weather at the end of August.

These repair works will now continue until Monday 28 September and navigation in this section will not resume before that date.

Published in Inland Waterways
Page 1 of 8

Marine Science Perhaps it is the work of the Irish research vessel RV Celtic Explorer out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of marine research, development and sustainable management, through which Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. From Wavebob Ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration these pages document the work of Irish marine science and how Irish scientists have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

 

At A Glance – Ocean Facts

  • 71% of the earth’s surface is covered by the ocean
  • The ocean is responsible for the water cycle, which affects our weather
  • The ocean absorbs 30% of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity
  • The real map of Ireland has a seabed territory ten times the size of its land area
  • The ocean is the support system of our planet.
  • Over half of the oxygen we breathe was produced in the ocean
  • The global market for seaweed is valued at approximately €5.4 billion
  • · Coral reefs are among the oldest ecosystems in the world — at 230 million years
  • 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast in Ireland
  • Ocean waters hold nearly 20 million tons of gold. If we could mine all of the gold from the ocean, we would have enough to give every person on earth 9lbs of the precious metal!
  • Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world – Ireland is ranked 7th largest aquaculture producer in the EU
  • The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean in the world, covering 20% of the earth’s surface. Out of all the oceans, the Atlantic Ocean is the saltiest
  • The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean in the world. It’s bigger than all the continents put together
  • Ireland is surrounded by some of the most productive fishing grounds in Europe, with Irish commercial fish landings worth around €200 million annually
  • 97% of the earth’s water is in the ocean
  • The ocean provides the greatest amount of the world’s protein consumed by humans
  • Plastic affects 700 species in the oceans from plankton to whales.
  • Only 10% of the oceans have been explored.
  • 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year, equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic into the ocean every minute.
  • 12 humans have walked on the moon but only 3 humans have been to the deepest part of the ocean.

(Ref: Marine Institute)

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating