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Displaying items by tag: Shannon Navigation

Waterways Ireland has suspended the five-day mooring rule until late October in the wake of the country’s move to Level 3 coronavirus restrictions.

As of this past Wednesday 7 October, the rule — which prohibits vessels from mooring in one spot for more than five days — has been suspended across Ireland's inland waterways for a three-week period until Tuesday 27 October, at which point restrictions will be reviewed.

Shortly after this, the winter mooring period commences on Sunday 1 November and owners of vessels can apply for permits at the Waterways Ireland website.

All locks, bridges and facilities on the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway remain open at the scheduled times with the exception of Portora Lock in Enniskillen, which will be temporary closed to boat traffic from 9am to 5pm next Wednesday 14 October for essential maintenance.

Masters of vessels and waterways users in the Republic are also reminded that in accordance with Level 3 restrictions, non-essential travel outside your home county is not allowed at present.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels that low water levels exist on the upstream approaches to Meelick and Victoria Lock on the Shannon Navigation.

Water levels are currently up to 39cm below summer levels in these areas due to a draw-down from the open sluices at Meelick Weir, similar to the advisory from July of this year.

Masters of vessels, particularly those with deep drafts, are advised to navigate with additional caution and to remain within the navigation at all times.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and water users on Lough Derg to proceed with caution moving in or out of Mountshannon as the green navigation marker for the western side of Cribby Island is currently off station.

Lough Derg has seen a rise in rescue callouts to cruisers in distress over recent weeks amid a boom in the Shannon cruiser hire industry driven by late summer ‘staycations’ on the waterways, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Inland Waterways

Instream works to install floating jetties downstream of Roosky Bridge on the Shannon Navigation have begun this week and will continue until Wednesday 30 September.

Waterways Ireland advises that delays to bridge lifts and lock operations on the inland waterway are to be expected during the six weeks of works.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland and Fáilte Ireland are encouraging staycationers to ‘make a break for it’ on the Shannon Navigation this summer.

And the latter has compiled a list of all currently open places to eat along with things to see and so along the waterway.

The visitor services directory for the Shannon Navigation is available HERE.

Published in Aquatic Tourism

Waterways Ireland advises masters and users of the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway that locks will be operating at summer hours from this coming Monday 20 July.

Locks on the Shannon Navigation will operate from 9am to 8.30pm Mondays to Saturdays, and 9am to 6pm on Sundays. On the Shannon-Erne Waterway, the hours are 9am to 8pm daily. (See below for contact details for each lock.)

The passage fee will continue to be waived until further notice. However, a smart card will be required to operate locks on the Shannon-Erne Waterway at all times; these may only be purchased in advance from Waterways Ireland’s online shop or from designated retail outlets along the waterway.

Work is also ongoing to reopen the service blocks - toilets and showers — at all locations along both waterways. Each is undergoing deep cleaning before reopening, and a comprehensive daily cleaning rota is being set up.

Reopening is on a phased basis with blocks at Lough Key and Carrick-on-Shannon the first to open on Monday.

It’s expected the rest — including Boyle Harbour, Dromod Harbour, Drumshanbo Lock, Portrun, Lecarrow, Ballinasloe, Scarriff and Killaloe — will be reopened throughout the week, with all service blocks abatable by Friday 24 July.

Users must comply with coronavirus protocols and HSE guidelines at all times when making use of these facilities.

Shannon Navigation lock-keepers are available at the following numbers (all +353):

  • Lough Allen Canal – 071 964 1552
  • Clarendon Lock - 071 966 7011
  • Albert Lock - 071 963 7715
  • Rooskey Lock - 071 963 8018
  • Tarmonbarry Lock - 043 332 6117
  • Athlone Lock - 090 649 2026
  • Poolboy Lock - 090 964 4938
  • Victoria Lock - 057 915 1359
  • Portumna Bridge - 090 974 1011
  • Ardnacrusha - 061 344 515
  • Sarsfield Lock - 087 797 2998

Should any assistance be required on the Shannon-Erne Waterway, use the following contacts:

  • Lock 1 - +44 286 7748976
  • Ballyconnell Waterway Patroller - +353 87 2603662
  • Ballinamore Waterway Patroller - +353 87 2602478
  • Kilclare Waterway Patroller - +353 87 2603663
  • Lock 16 - +353 87 2608569
  • Carrick-on-Shannon Office - +353 71 9650562

 For further information on the reopening of the navigation please visit www.waterwaysireland.org

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels that low water levels exist on the upstream approaches to Meelick Weir and Victoria Lock, north of Portumna on the Shannon Navigation.

Water levels are currently up to 45cm below summer levels as weir boards are out at Meelick Weir, which creates a draw-down of water levels in the area.

Masters of vessels, particularly those with deep drafts, are advised to navigate with additional caution and to remain within the navigation at all times.

Published in Inland Waterways

Locks will reopen for longer and winter mooring will end on the Shannon Navigation from Monday 29 June, Waterways Ireland has announced.

Following this past week’s changes in the wake of phase two of Ireland’s coronavirus recovery roadmap, daily lock operating hours will be extended to 6pm on the Shannon.

As previously reported, electricity and water services have been reconnected, and normal pump-out facilities are available.

However, Waterways Ireland service blocks will remain closed for the time being across its network of inland waterways.

And the five-day mooring rule will be in force from Monday 29 June. Boaters to not need to travel to move their vessel before this date.

Waterway users, whether on the water on on towpaths, are reminded to continue observing social distancing protocols — at least two metres from other people — and to stay within 20km of home until travel restrictions are relaxed with the start of phase three.

Waterways Ireland has provided updated roadmaps for reopening in the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland respectively.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels that drilling and site investigation works will take place on the Shannon Navigation in the vicinity of Athlone Marina from this Wednesday 27 to Monday 31 May.

The drilling will take place from a barge. A safety boat will be in attendance at all times. Master of Vessels are requested to proceed with additional caution when in the vicinity of the works.

The advisory comes as water levels across the entire Shannon Navigation are currently classed as at or below ‘ordinary summer levels’ which requires extra caution, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Inland Waterways

​The public consultation on the draft Shannon Tourism Masterplan and Environmental Report will close at 4pm this coming Wednesday 22 April.

Members of the public can review all the documents online and make their submission through the online survey.

The list of documents available to view are an Executive Summary, the draft Shannon Tourism Masterplan, a baseline study for the Masterplan, the Environmental Report, and AA Screen Report and Natura Impact Report.

This consultation is the next stage in an 18-month process to create a definitive document to support the development of tourism along the Shannon corridor.

Led by Waterways Ireland, with Fáilte Ireland, the steering group and working groups engaged representatives from Cavan, Leitrim, Roscommon, Longford, Offaly, Galway, Tipperary, Clare, Westmeath and Limerick county councils – which are all stakeholders in the longest of Ireland’s inland waterways.

Published in Inland Waterways
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Marine Science Perhaps it is the work of the Irish research vessel RV Celtic Explorer out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of marine research, development and sustainable management, through which Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. From Wavebob Ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration these pages document the work of Irish marine science and how Irish scientists have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

 

At A Glance – Ocean Facts

  • 71% of the earth’s surface is covered by the ocean
  • The ocean is responsible for the water cycle, which affects our weather
  • The ocean absorbs 30% of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity
  • The real map of Ireland has a seabed territory ten times the size of its land area
  • The ocean is the support system of our planet.
  • Over half of the oxygen we breathe was produced in the ocean
  • The global market for seaweed is valued at approximately €5.4 billion
  • · Coral reefs are among the oldest ecosystems in the world — at 230 million years
  • 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast in Ireland
  • Ocean waters hold nearly 20 million tons of gold. If we could mine all of the gold from the ocean, we would have enough to give every person on earth 9lbs of the precious metal!
  • Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world – Ireland is ranked 7th largest aquaculture producer in the EU
  • The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean in the world, covering 20% of the earth’s surface. Out of all the oceans, the Atlantic Ocean is the saltiest
  • The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean in the world. It’s bigger than all the continents put together
  • Ireland is surrounded by some of the most productive fishing grounds in Europe, with Irish commercial fish landings worth around €200 million annually
  • 97% of the earth’s water is in the ocean
  • The ocean provides the greatest amount of the world’s protein consumed by humans
  • Plastic affects 700 species in the oceans from plankton to whales.
  • Only 10% of the oceans have been explored.
  • 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year, equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic into the ocean every minute.
  • 12 humans have walked on the moon but only 3 humans have been to the deepest part of the ocean.

(Ref: Marine Institute)

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