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Displaying items by tag: Skerries

Skerries RNLI rescued two men, a father and son, who had got into difficulty in the water while kitesurfing on Friday afternoon (3 November).

The Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson was launched by the volunteers in Skerries shortly before 4.30pm, following an emergency call to Dublin Coast Guard from a member of the public reporting that several kitesurfers appeared unable to return to shore off the south beach in Skerries.

After rounded the headland of Red Island, almost immediately the crew spotted two men in the water holding on to a kitesurfing board.

The two were helped aboard the lifeboat, where the volunteers took steps to protect them from the elements and assessed their condition.

With both men showing early signs of hypothermia, an ambulance was requested to meet the lifeboat back at the boathouse. Following an assessment by paramedics, one of the men was transferred to hospital for further monitoring and treatment.

Conditions at the time had a Force 4-5 westerly wind with a slight sea swell and good visibility albeit with fading light.

Speaking about the call-out, volunteer lifeboat press officer Gerry Canning said: “When you get a call to say that someone is in difficulty and they are already in the water, every second counts.

“One of the men commented that he was incredibly relieved to see a big orange boat appear on the horizon as he didn’t think they had much strength left.

“Well done to the people that raised the alarm. It just goes to show, if you see someone in trouble on the water, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard — it can make all the difference.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Fingal County Council, in accordance with the provisions of its bye-laws, has removed a number of small boats which were illegally chained to the railings on Harbour Road in Skerries.

Owners can make arrangements to retrieve their boats on payment of a fine of €150 to Fingal County Council by emailing the Harbour Master at [email protected]. The council says it is prepared to waive this €150 fine for owners who retrieve their boats on or before Monday 23 October.

Any boat not retrieved by Monday 6 November, whether or not the €150 fine has been paid, will be destroyed and the council shall not be liable for any loss to the owner.

Anyone claiming ownership of any particular boat will be required to present to the Harbour Master photographic ID in the form or a driver’s licence, passport or public services card, as well as proof of address in the form of a utility bill, bank statement, letter from an official public body, etc.

Copies of this documentation will be retained by Fingal County Council and may be produced at a later date to An Garda Síochána in the event of any dispute over ownership of a boat being claimed.

Published in Irish Harbours

Skerries RNLI rescued two men and two women on Monday evening (4 September) after their personal watercraft broke down off Portrane beach.

Shortly before 6pm, Dublin Coast Guard tasked the volunteers at Skerries RNLI following receipt of a radio transmission that indicated there may be people in difficulty off Portrane beach.

The radio transmissions had been weak and were over-spoken by other transmissions. However, the watch officers in Dublin Coast Guard accessed their recording system and were able to isolate certain words, including the type of craft and approximate location.

Skerries RNLI’s Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson was launched and the crew plotted a course for the approximate position provided.

Arriving on scene, the crew contacted the coastguard and were informed that no further information had been received. They had just begun to search the area when one of the volunteers spotted the casualty a good distance further out to sea.

As they approached the casualty, they discovered that it was a personal watercraft and an inflatable towing ring, with two men and two women on board. All four were taken on board the lifeboat and assessed.

Despite being adrift for almost an hour, they were all well, albeit beginning to feel cold.

It was confirmed that the craft had suffered a mechanical failure having sucked a foreign object into the propulsion system.

The lifeboat helm decided to tow the vessel to the nearest safe harbour at the slipway by Rush Sailing Club to prevent it becoming a hazard to navigation.

All four casualties and the personal watercraft were brought safely ashore, and the lifeboat made its way back to Skerries where it was recovered to the boathouse and made ready for the next service.

Conditions at the time had a Force 1-2 northerly wind with calm seas and good visibility.

Speaking about the call-out, Skerries RNLI volunteer lifeboat press officer Gerry Canning said: “This was one of those call-outs that highlights that no matter how prepared you are, things can and do go wrong at sea.

“All four were wearing good lifejackets and despite drifting quite a long way out, did the right thing in remaining calm, staying with the vessel and raising the alarm on their VHF.

“There was some really great work here by our colleagues in Dublin Coast Guard in recognising that the initial VHF call was unusual and following it up to get vital information. It was also great work by the crew on the lifeboat in finding a very small target in quite a large sea area.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Skerries RNLI were tasked just before 10pm on Friday night (4 August) following a 999 call to report that two teenagers were stranded on Shenick Island, having been cut off by the incoming tide.

The volunteers in Skerries launched their Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson and proceeded to make their way around the headland at Red Island in Skerries towards Shenick Island.

Arriving on scene, the lifeboat crew quickly spotted the two teenagers on the shoreline on the island. The lifeboat was manoeuvred into shallow water near the bar between the mainland and the island and a crew member made their way ashore.

Having confirmed that no medical assistance was required, the crew member helped the teenagers make their way out the lifeboat and brought to the station where they were given some dry blankets and refreshments to warm themselves while they waited for someone to collect them.

Weather conditions at the time had a Force 2-3 south-easterly wind with a calm sea and good visibility.

This was the second day in a row that the lifeboat was tasked to people stranded on Shenick, having responded to a similar call as they finished training on Thursday evening. In that instance the people made it ashore themselves.

Speaking about the call-out, volunteer lifeboat press officer Gerry Canning said: “When [the teenagers] realised that they had gotten their timing wrong and were not going to get back to shore as the water was getting deeper, they absolutely made the right call in returning to the island and calling for help and we always encourage anyone in difficulty on or near the water to dial 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A team of three Donegal brothers have won the Three Island currach rowing challenge in Skerries, Co Dublin, this weekend.

Simon, Ronan and Michael O Dómhnaill from Gaoth Dobhair had won the race for traditional currachs in 2021, and were determined to regain their title after failing to secure it last year.

The 2023 race course was changed to allow for inclement weather, with the 12 competing boats completing a seven-kilometre trajectory on the leeward side of the three islands off the coast of the north Dublin harbour.

Currach (on right) the brothers from left Michael, Simon and Ronan O’ Domhnaill from Gweedore Co Donegal who won the Three Island challenge in Skerries during the race as they compete with a team from Carlingford LoughCurrach (on right) the brothers from left Michael, Simon and Ronan O’ Domhnaill from Gweedore Co Donegal who won the Three Island challenge in Skerries during the race as they compete with a team from Carlingford Lough Photo: Maxwells

The Skerries Three Island challenge / Dúshlán na dTrí Oileán na Sceirí differs from other regattas, in that it is open to all types of currachaí, including two, three and four-hander boats, with a handicap system being applied.

The race is described as a demonstration of “both athleticism and the many different crafts involved in traditional Irish boats”.

The challenge was hosted by Currachaí na Sceirí, a group of boatbuilding rowers and enthusiasts who have revived the currach racing tradition in the fishing harbour.

It dates back to 1959, when Denis Guiney, founder of Clerys department store, presented a silver cup to the Skerries Currach race.

Captain Paul Lampkin from Skerries as he keeps a watch on participants who took part in the Three Island challenge in Skerries . Pic Maxwell’s Captain Paul Lampkin from Skerries as he keeps a watch on participants who took part in the Three Island challenge in Skerries Photo: Maxwells

Currachaí na Sceirí has built a number of its own currachs, and purchased boats from Cork and Clare.

It also has a North Mayo-style Belderrig currach, which had previously featured in the “Game of Thrones” television series, and “King Arthur”.

The team from Skerries Currach Club from left Dermott Higgins, Anca Marginen, Donal Ruane, Finbar O Connor and Tony Moran from who took part in the Three Island challenge in Skerries Photo: MaxwellsThe team from Skerries Currach Club from left Dermott Higgins, Anca Marginen, Donal Ruane, Finbar O Connor and Tony Moran from who took part in the Three Island challenge in Skerries Photo: Maxwells

As previously reported by Afloat, the Skerries boat, An Béal Deirg, is a five hander 24 foot salmon fishing type of currach, which there is only a handful of worldwide.

In 2002, the National Museum of Ireland commissioned skilled boat-builder Pádraig Ó Duinnín and a team from Meitheal Mara in Cork to construct the Belderrig currach on the grounds of the National Museum of Ireland – Country Life, Turlough Park in Castlebar.

Catriona Ni Mhaidin from Cork as she races to the line to plant their flag, who took part in the Three Island challenge in Skerries Photo: Maxwells Cathriona Ni Mhaidin from Cork as she races to the line to plant their flag, who took part in the Three Island currach challenge in Skerries Photo: Maxwells

Presenting the East Coast Currach Rowing Championship Perpetual Cup to the three Ó Domhnaill oarsmen, newly elected Mayor of Fingal Cllr Adrian Henchy paid tribute to the “magnificent currachaí” and the “phenomenal craftsmanship” involved in the vessels.

The currach team from Carlingford Lough Currach Club Warrenpoint from left Paul Hogan and his wife Miriam and Madonna Jones who took part in the Three Island challenge in SkerriesThe currach team from Carlingford Lough Currach Club Warrenpoint from left Paul Hogan and his wife Miriam and Madonna Jones who took part in the Three Island challenge in Skerries

“And it’s great to see so many people travelling to be part of this event; people coming from overseas and all over Ireland, with competing teams coming from Clare, Cork, Down and Donegal and other counties,” Mayor Henchy said.

“The Three Island Challenge is a wonderful community event, and Skerries is a fantastic town right in the heart of Fingal, and I want to pay tribute to the organisers of the challenge, the Currachaí na Sceirí group, and all the volunteers that made today’s event possible,” he said.

Published in Coastal Rowing
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Skerries RNLI responded on Sunday evening (26 March) to reports that there was possibly a person in distress in the water off the south strand in Skerries.

Dublin Coast Guard tasked the lifeboat volunteers in Skerries shortly before 8pm after a member of the public had dialled 999 to report clothing on the beach in Skerries and a dog running around the beach distressed.

Skerries Coast Guard unit responded to the incident and shortly after arriving on scene spotted an object floating in the water between the beach and Colt Island. With the concern that there may be a person in distress in the water, the lifeboat was requested to investigate the object and carry out a search of the area.

The inshore lifeboat was promptly launched and after navigating around the headland at Red Island was on scene in a matter of minutes.

Liaising with the Skerries Coast Guard unit, the lifeboat began to search the approximate area that the object had been spotted. The volunteer crew soon spotted several semi-submerged lobster pots in the area and reported this back to Skerries Coast Guard unit on the shoreline before continuing the search.

With the area thoroughly searched and no further indications that a person had entered the water, the lifeboat was stood down and returned to station where it was refuelled, washed down and made ready for the next callout.

Conditions at the time had Force 3-4 southerly winds with slight swell.

This was the third callout for Skerries RNLI in a number of days. On Thursday evening (23 March) hey assisted in a multi-agency rescue alongside Dublin Fire Brigade, An Garda Siochana and the Irish Coast Guard’s Dublin-based helicopter Rescue 116 after a car entered the water from the slipway in Skerries.

Then on Saturday (25 March) the volunteers were paged following reports of a swimmer in difficulty near the popular Skerries swimming spot known as the Springers. However, it was confirmed visually by lifeboat operations manager Niall McGrotty that the man did not need assistance and had made his way ashore.

Speaking about the callouts, Skerries RNLI volunteer lifeboat press officer Gerry Canning said: “It’s been a busy few days for our volunteers but they are ready to respond to any call for help, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

“Thankfully in this instance it was a false alarm with good intent and we always encourage anyone who thinks someone may be in trouble on or near the water to dial 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Skerries RNLI towed a razor-clam fishing boat with two men on board to safety on Tuesday afternoon (31 January) after they suffered mechanical failure near Rockabill lighthouse.

The volunteers in Skerries launched the Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson shortly after 1.30pm. They were paged following a notification from Dublin Coast Guard that a fishing vessel had broken down and required assistance near the Rockabill lighthouse.

The all-weather lifeboat from Howth RNLI was also tasked and their volunteers set off from Howth towards the vessel.

Skerries RNLI proceeded towards the position indicated by the stricken vessel, and following a short search of the area quickly located the boat some four miles northwest of Rockabill.

It emerged that the fishers had suffered a major mechanical failure and were unable to make any headway under their own power.

Due to the sea conditions, and the potential hazard to other vessels in the area, the lifeboat helm decided that the safest course of action was to tow the fishing boat back to the nearest safe port in Skerries.

An astern tow was established and the lifeboat proceeded towards Skerries with Howth RNLI standing by and providing escort in case the conditions deteriorated any further or the tow parted.

In the calmer water outside the harbour in Skerries, the fishing boat was taken into an alongside tow before being carefully manoeuvred against the pier.

Conditions at the time had Force 5-6 northwesterly winds with a slight to moderate chop.

Speaking about the callout, Gerry Canning, volunteer lifeboat press officer for Skerries RNLI said: “This was a job well done in challenging conditions by the volunteers here in Skerries and also the volunteers from Howth.

“We would remind anyone going to sea to ensure that they have all the safety equipment they need. And where possible carry a VHF radio as mobile phone signal can be unreliable when you are further from the shore.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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On Sunday 5 February, RNLI volunteers past and present will gather at Skerries lifeboat station in north Co Dublin to lay a wreath at sea and remember six of their colleagues who were lost while on a service in 1873.

On 2 February that that year, the lifeboat from Skerries was capsized while proceeding to the assistance of the schooner Sarah of Runcorn which had got into difficulty off Balbriggan.

Six of the men on the lifeboat were drowned: Patrick Reid, James Kelly, William Fitzpatrick, Joseph Halpin, Richard Cochrane, Albert Fanning.

Speaking about the tragedy, Skerries RNLI chair and local historian Sam Shiels said: “At about 8.45pm, in the pitch dark, it was a very stormy night with snow and heavy winds, when the Skerries Lifeboat and coastguard got the call.

“The lifeboat crew went to the aid of Sarah of Runcorn under sail but as they got close to the listing ship, they pulled in their sails and started to row. So rough was it, that the oars of the lifeboat crew were wrenched from their hands.

“Over the next few hours the crews of both Skerries Lifeboat and Coastguard fought admirably to save the crew. Unfortunately, such was the storm, the heavy seas, that six souls were lost that night.

“Today we honour those souls and the legacy they left behind; 150 years later, the spirit of the volunteers who put to sea to save others is still strong.”

The ceremony is scheduled to begin at 12.30pm on Sunday 2 February at Skerries lifeboat station.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Skerries RNLI were tasked on Saturday afternoon (17 September) after Dublin Coast Guard received reports from kayakers that a fishing vessel had sunk off Loughshinny in north Co Dublin and a man was in the water.

The Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson was launched by the volunteers in Skerries shortly before 3pm when they were asked to investigate reports of a man in the water clinging to debris.

As they were arriving on scene, they received an update that the man had been picked up by another fishing boat from Loughshinny and was ashore safely.

One of the volunteers on board is a local doctor, so the lifeboat proceeded into Loughshinny so that he could carry out an assessment of the casualty. However, no further medical assistance was required.

At the request of Dublin Coast Guard, the crew then located the sunken vessel, a razor fishing boat, and recorded the GPS coordinates before recovering any large debris floating on the surface to prevent any further hazards to navigation.

As the boat was on its way back to the station, one of the volunteer shore crew spotted a member of the public having a medical emergency beside the station.

The woman and her family were brought into the station where the volunteers began to administer first aid and called for an ambulance. The lifeboat arrived back and dropped the doctor on board ashore to help with the emergency in the station.

Skerries Coast Guard unit were also on scene and assisted with the casualty care before managing the traffic for the ambulance and assisting with the recovery of the lifeboat to the station.

Speaking about the callout, volunteer lifeboat press officer Gerry Canning said: “We are very proud of our volunteers for their vigilance and professionalism in two very different but equally stressful situations.

“We also saw another fine example of all the emergency services working together, with volunteers and professionals seamlessly pulling together to try and ensure the best outcome.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Skerries RNLI were tasked on Thursday morning (8 September) following emergency calls to Dublin Coast Guard reporting a small RIB with a person on board in difficulty off Rush beach.

Pagers were sounded shortly after 11.30am and the volunteers quickly launched the Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson.

The lifeboat navigated around the headland at Red Island and through the islands before proceeding towards Rush, around 6km south of Skerries in north Co Dublin.

As they were approaching the area indicated by the concerned caller, the crew obtained a visual on the boat immediately. The lifeboat was positioned alongside the vessel and it was quickly determined that there was nobody on board and that the vessel was securely tied to a mooring.

Dublin Coast Guard on radio were satisfied that it was a false alarm with good intent. The lifeboat was stood down and returned to station in Skerries. Conditions at the time had a fForce 4-5 northeasterly wind with a moderately choppy sea.

Speaking about the callout, volunteer lifeboat press officer Gerry Canning said: “Thankfully in this instance it was a false alarm with good intent. The member of the public was genuinely concerned that someone was in trouble on the water and did the right thing in dialling 999 and asking for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Marine Science Perhaps it is the work of the Irish research vessel RV Celtic Explorer out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of marine research, development and sustainable management, through which Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. From Wavebob Ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration these pages document the work of Irish marine science and how Irish scientists have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

 

At A Glance – Ocean Facts

  • 71% of the earth’s surface is covered by the ocean
  • The ocean is responsible for the water cycle, which affects our weather
  • The ocean absorbs 30% of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity
  • The real map of Ireland has a seabed territory ten times the size of its land area
  • The ocean is the support system of our planet.
  • Over half of the oxygen we breathe was produced in the ocean
  • The global market for seaweed is valued at approximately €5.4 billion
  • · Coral reefs are among the oldest ecosystems in the world — at 230 million years
  • 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast in Ireland
  • Ocean waters hold nearly 20 million tons of gold. If we could mine all of the gold from the ocean, we would have enough to give every person on earth 9lbs of the precious metal!
  • Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world – Ireland is ranked 7th largest aquaculture producer in the EU
  • The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean in the world, covering 20% of the earth’s surface. Out of all the oceans, the Atlantic Ocean is the saltiest
  • The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean in the world. It’s bigger than all the continents put together
  • Ireland is surrounded by some of the most productive fishing grounds in Europe, with Irish commercial fish landings worth around €200 million annually
  • 97% of the earth’s water is in the ocean
  • The ocean provides the greatest amount of the world’s protein consumed by humans
  • Plastic affects 700 species in the oceans from plankton to whales.
  • Only 10% of the oceans have been explored.
  • 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year, equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic into the ocean every minute.
  • 12 humans have walked on the moon but only 3 humans have been to the deepest part of the ocean.

(Ref: Marine Institute)

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