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Displaying items by tag: canoeing

Patrick O’Leary has become European Champion at the Canoe Sprint and Paracanoe European Championships in Poznan -Poland.

Racing in the VL3 Final, Patrick got off to a brilliant start, trading the lead with Adrian Mosquera of Spain, eventually taking the win in a photo finish, 0.1 seconds ahead of Mosquera.

The win comes after a great performance in the qualification round of the VL3, finishing in 3rdplace in his heat on Thursday to qualify directly through to today's final.

VL3 Final O'Leary tops the VL3 Final scoresheet 

Patrick will race tomorrow afternoon again in the final of the KL3 200m, and will hopefully back up this sensational performance with another medal-winning performance. This result will give Patrick great momentum as he closes in on racing in this summers Paralympic Games, where he will again compete in the VL3 and KL3.

Patrick O'Leary Patrick will race tomorrow afternoon again in the final of the KL3 200m

Elsewhere in the Canoe Sprint European Championships, Barry Watkins will compete in the B final of the K1 Men 500m and 1000m. With Jenny Egan contesting the K1Women 200m,500m and 5000m later in the weekend.

Published in Canoeing
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Irish canoeist Jenny Egan has won a silver medal in the 5000m at last weekend’s Canoe Sprint World Cup in Barnaul, Russia. The performance is made all the more impressive coming off the back of a huge disappointment for Egan, missing out on the final Olympic qualification spot just three days previously.

Egan has made a strong statement with a silver medal win, the brilliant performance was backed up by a seventh place finish in the A final of the 200m two days previous.

These back to back fantastic performances came following a huge disappointment in the final Olympic Qualifier, where after making the final to fight for the final qualification spot for Tokyo Jenny finished 9th in the final missing out on the Olympic spot, the spot being ultimately taken by Russia.

Not one to sit back after an upset, Jenny immediately came back to make the 200m final of the World Cup. And even more impressively, took the fight to the 5000m final, coming home in 2nd place, just shy of the gold in a nail-biting sprint finish with the German Paulina Paszek. This will be added to Jenny’s previous Silver and Bronze medals won in her signature 5000m.

Published in Canoeing
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Canoeing's Team Ireland is just home after a European Championships full of tight margins and near misses. An event that truly showed the cruel nature of sport with three incredibly near misses for Olympic Qualifications.

Amid the near misses, there was no shortage of fantastic performances to make these near misses possible, setting up what promises to be a very exciting season of racing for Canoeing Ireland.

The international season for Canoe Slalom got underway on May 6th with the 2021 European Canoe Slalom Championships. Not only an elite level championship this event also acted as the European Continental Olympic Qualifier, with a single Olympic spot up for grabs in each of the 4 categories being contested at the event.

Noel Hendrick competing in the K1 Men divisionNoel Hendrick competing in the K1 Men division

The newly selected Irish Team was filled with proven international performers eager to get into the fight for the final Olympic berths for Tokyo.

The key categories in which Team Ireland was chasing qualification were the K1 Men (Samuel Curtis, Noel Hendrick and Alistair McCreery), the K1 Women (Hannah Craig and Madison Corcoran) and the C1 Women (Michaela Corcoran).

Across all the racing in these categories the tightest by far was seen in the K1 Men, with the Olympic spot coming down to the wire between Noel Hendrick and Krysztof Majerczak of Poland. After a great performance in the qualification rounds Noel Hendrick rose again to the occasion with an even more impressive run the in the semi-finals, laying down a marker for the remaining athletes seeking Olympic qualification to chase.

Athlete after athlete in contention for the Tokyo spot came down and finished behind Noel in the standings, with the agonising wait coming to a close with Majerczak of Poland, the last athlete in the running for the Olympic berth, storming down the course to claim the qualification spot. While the ultimate goal of the Olympic games was not reached, it was nonetheless an extremely impressive performance from the young athlete, making a statement as to his current and future form.

In the Olympic battle for the K1 Women it was the experience of Hannah Craig (London 2012 Olympian) that came closest for Ireland. With Hannah's final placing of 32nd being just 0.8 seconds away from a spot in the semi final, and a chance to race against Naemi Braendle of Switzerland for the final qualification spot.

The C1 Women featured a similar story, with Michaela Corcoran incurring a 50-second penalty to take her out of the running for the Olympic spot in her category.
Outside of the Olympic qualification battle, Irelands already confirmed 2021 Olympian Liam Jegou was top of Irelands C1 Men. Liam showed his hard winter of training with a 10th place in the qualification rounds, going on to suffer penalties in the semi-final to finish in 30th overall for the event. The C1 Men team also put up a valiant fight to defend their silver medal from last years Euros, finishing in 5th place in the final, just one 2 second penalty away from a spot on the podium.


2021 Canoe Slalom European Championships & Olympic Qualifier Full results

K1 Men
Noel Hendrick - 24th Alistair McCreery - 37th Samuel Curtis - 44th

K1 Women
Hannah Craig – 32nd Madison Corcoran – 34th

C1 Women
Michaela Corcoran - 35th

C1 Men
Liam Jegou – 30th Robert Hendrick – 32nd Jake Cochrane – 38th

Published in Canoeing
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Northern Ireland Canoeist Jake Cochrane won a bronze medal in the C1 Men Final earlier this month at the first race of the 2021 Pyrenees Cup, an ICF ranking series held in northern Spain and southern France.

The full-time Canoe Slalom athlete from Jordanstown showed great pace all weekend, starting with third in the qualification round, and carrying the momentum to his medal-winning performance with a clean run of 93.70 seconds in the final.

Also in action was 2012 Olympian Hannah Craig, who showed the strength of the Irish Team this year, making the finals of the K1 Women, finishing ninth.

The Pyrenees Cup is a series of races held in southern France and northern Spain, attracting a very high level of competition with international racers from all over Europe using the series to get their first start line of the year.

Published in Canoeing
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Paddlers from all disciplines and backgrounds were honoured last night at the 2021 Canoeing Ireland Awards. At the virtual ceremony, Awards were presented for a diverse range of achievements across paddlesports in 2020. While 2020 was a difficult year for all sports, Canoeing Ireland was lucky that some athletes had the opportunity to compete internationally, and to have a small number of domestic events around the country.

In a challenging year, it was even more important to celebrate achievements and to mark the passion and hard work which was put into keeping things afloat.

Canoeing event of the year - Canoeing event of the year - The 10k charity paddle winner was chosen by public vote

At the ceremony itself, Awards were presented across six categories –

  • Community Impact Award. For work promoting our sport while having a positive impact on the local community. Winner – Martina Slevin. Martina has been a driving force behind creating opportunities for women to participate in paddlesports, facilitating training courses for women, and running brilliant charity events.
  • Team of the Year. The best team performance from the 2020 competition season. Winner – C1 Men Canoe Slalom Team. Awarded for the incredible performance at the 2020 European Championships where the team took home a silver medal. Irelands first in Team racing.
  • COVID Response Award. For outstanding service to the sport in facilitating a safe return to activity. Winner – Shane Henderson. Shane voluntarily rolled out a COVID hygiene training programme for Canoeing Ireland members as well as producing COVID screening questionnaires for use in clubs across the country.
  • Athlete of the Year. The outstanding athlete from the 2020 season. Winner – Liam Jegou. Liam's historic World Cup Gold Medal at the ICF World Cup in Pau was the deciding factor in the awarding of Athlete of the Year. The first Gold Medal won by an Irish Athlete in the C1 Men category.
  • Event of the Year. While every event held in 2020 was an achievement in its own right, Event of the Year was awarded to the event which best captured the passion for paddlesports. The winner was chosen by public vote. Winner – Rape Crisis 10K Charity Paddle. In aid of Rape Crisis Midwest, this event also acted as an opportunity to get people out on the water for their first time in a boat. The organisers also hosted a series of pre- event courses for women and beginner paddlers.
  • Volunteer of the Year. The most popular and highly contested category each year, this award is presented to a volunteer who has best served our sport through their passion, selfless work, and continued commitment to our sport. Winner – Patricia McCormack. Patricia has been a long serving volunteer in Canoe Polo. Patricia is a founding member of Kilcock Canoe Polo Club, has served on the Canoe Polo National Committee and has many times travelled with the National Team as coach and manager. After her own diagnosis with cancer, Patricia launched the ‘Mahon Cup’, a fundraising event for cancer charities which brought together women polo players of all ages for a fun day of competition.

Canoeing volunteer of the yearCanoeing volunteer of the year - Patricia McCormack

The opportunity to celebrate the wins from a roller-coaster year in 2020 was enjoyed by both the organisers and attendees. 2021 is shaping up to be an even bigger and better year for paddlesports, promising a lot more to celebrate when the 2022 Awards roll around.

Published in Canoeing
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Liam Jegou made Irish canoeing history today taking Ireland’s first-ever World Cup Gold medal in the C1 Men category.

In the final of the ICF World Cup in Pau, France, Liam put down a run of 100.35 seconds to take the top spot and secure his first-ever World Cup medal, 0.73 seconds ahead of the Czech Republic’s Vaclav Chaloupka.

This medal performance followed brilliant racing during the whole competition, with Liam also posting the fastest time in Friday's qualification event, and producing further composed racing to finish in sixth in the semi-final and secure his final spot.

Tokyo 2021 confirmed Olympian Liam Jegou has won Gold at the World Cup in Pau, FranceTokyo 2021 confirmed Olympian Liam Jegou has won Gold at the World Cup in Pau, France

As Afloat reported previously, Liam in the past few years had moved to Pau to train full time so was effectively racing on home water, showing his mastery of this course with consistently fast racing across the whole competition. This outstanding result reflects the hard work the Irish athlete has been putting in all summer in the lead in to next years Tokyo Olympic Games, where Liam is the first athlete to have qualified for Team Ireland at the upcoming Games.

“I’ve been pushing myself really hard now for several years, and all summer, preparing for events like this. So I’m absolutely thrilled to put down a big run like this in the seniors, it means a lot.” Liam Jegou

Hannah Craig

Elsewhere in the World Cup, London 2012 Olympian, Hannah Craig made a great return to competition finishing 13th in the K1 Women's event, narrowly missing out on a spot in the finals. Giving Hannah great motivation to take on her bid to qualify for the Tokyo Games in early next year. In the K1 Men Ireland was represented by junior athlete Tom Morley, getting great experience at World Cup level and paving the way for a bright future.

Published in Canoeing
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This weekend will see Canoe Slalom athletes compete behind closed doors at a World Cup race in Pau, France, where London 2012 Olympian Hannah Craig, and Tokyo 2021 confirmed Olympian Liam Jegou will both be racing for Ireland.

After the massive COVID disruptions for the International canoe slalom community this season, getting the opportunity to once again paddle on the magnificent Pau course will be a moment to savour this weekend and a return to the international circuit.

A few days after having hosted the selections for the composition of the French team for the next Olympic Games (from October 7 to 11), the White Water Stadium will once again be the stage of spectacular women’s and men’s races in slalom and extreme slalom.

Canoe Slalom

Canoe Slalom is an Olympic discipline which consists in doing a wild water course almost 400 metres in length as quickly as possible whilst respecting a mandatory route, indicated by gates (18 to 25 maximum). There are two types of gate:

  • Green gates: passed through heading downstream
  • Red gates: negotiated heading upstream

Gates which the canoer touches, or those that are not crossed, are counted as penalties, which add to the finishing time of the course (2 seconds for a touch, 50 seconds for a missed gate).

International categories

  • Men’s kayak single (MK1) and women’s kayak single (WK1)
  • Men’s canoe single (MC1) and women’s canoe single (WC1)
  • Men’s Extreme Canoe Slalom (MCSLX) and Women’s Extreme Canoe Slalom (WCSLX)

Courses involving team events with three boats also exist.

Canoe Slalom is practised on more or less complicated whitewater courses depending on the level of the competition, with a qualifying phase of two rounds followed by a semi-final and a final round.

Published in Canoeing
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Team Ireland is off to a great start at the 2020 Junior & U23 Canoe Slalom European Championships. Held in Krakow, Poland the championships are running from 1st-4th of October.

Day one of racing saw the only Irish competitor in the C1 men category, Robert Hendrick, get the momentum going for the team, putting in an excellent run to qualify through to the semi-final in 7th place.

To continue the success, today the K1 Men U23 team, consisting of Noel Hendrick and Alistair McCreey, both qualified through to Sunday's semi-final. Noel putting in a strong performance to finish 17th in a very competitive race.

This is a fantastic start to the competition for Canoeing Ireland to see 3 of the 4 athletes competition through to the semi-final. Continuing the great run of form the team is seeing in recent years.
Robert Hendrick race on Saturday morning in the C1 Men semi-final, with Noel Hendrick and Alistair McCreey racing on Sunday in the K1 Men.

Published in Canoeing
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Texaco has launched a support for sport initiative which sets aside a fund of €130,000 for distribution to sports clubs on a twenty-six, county-by-county basis, with successful applicants receiving €5,000 each.

At a time when many sports clubs may be experiencing financial strain, the initiative is one that Valero hopes will recognise the important contribution that sports clubs make to communities and throughout Irish society as a whole.

Open to sports clubs across the 26-counties of Ireland – irrespective of sporting discipline, size, membership, age, cultural appeal or gender – it is expected to attract all whose activities, goals and ambitions can, in the view of adjudicators, be materially advanced through the receipt and proper use of funding.

Speaking at the launch of the Texaco Support for Sport initiative, James Twohig, Director of Ireland Operations, Valero Energy (Ireland) Limited, described Irish sports clubs as a unifying element and a focal point for good in our communities. “In our cities, towns and villages, sports clubs are the magnets to which so many of us are drawn, homes-from-home where we meet and enjoy the friendship and camaraderie that sport offers and that all members and supporters share,” he said.

“By offering a new and innovative route to funding, we believe that the Texaco Support for Sport initiative will help uphold the unique values and characteristics that countless numbers of dedicated club members work so hard to preserve, whilst giving new expression to the cherished relationship that exists between the Texaco brand and generations of Irish sports enthusiasts,” James Twohig added.

Adjudication

Leading the adjudication process will be Texaco Support for Sport ambassador, acclaimed broadcaster and former Irish rugby international, Donncha O’Callaghan. “From my knowledge of sports clubs, gained at junior, senior and international level, I know how beneficial the Texaco Support for Sport initiative will be by bringing a much-needed benefit to clubs when it is least expected. Now more than ever, our clubs and volunteers need our support. I am really looking forward to reviewing the online applications, which provides clubs with the opportunity to showcase their importance to their local communities, and then seeing the recipients enjoy the benefit of this great initiative,” he added.

Application

Sports clubs can apply for funding from the Texaco Support for Sport from the 1 October 2020, the only requirement being that they be properly constituted and hold a valid Games & Sports Number (GS Number) issued by the Office of the Revenue Commissioners.

Those wishing to apply are invited to submit full details of their sporting activity, the purpose for which the funding is sought and the use to which it will be put. Full details of the scheme and its operation - together with registration, application, validation, adjudication and terms and conditions - are available to view at www.TexacoSupportforSport.com

Closing date for applications is the 31 December 2020 with adjudication taking place in January 2021.

Published in News Update
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Walking along the riverside in Cork Harbour in the past few days of good weather the harbour waters looked inviting, but as I thought of the pleasure of having the sails up, helm in hand, boat moving through the water, the sound of a bow wave ... the emptiness of the harbour waters told another tale… Along the river walk, I saw boats still lying fenced in.

While Irish Sailing negotiated the difficulties of a return to the water and drafted a plan for discussion with clubs, I pondered over why canoeing had been named as the only waterborne sport included in the initial suggestions for a return of watersports.

So I pursued that with a ‘contact’ of mine, as journalists are wont to have, within the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport. That single-handed sailing was not mentioned surprised me. My ‘source’ told me that canoeing had been considered because it was “a safe, individual sport, hence social distancing would not be a problem.”

So, why not single-handed sailing – Lasers, Toppers, Optimists – even giving younger sailors a chance to get on the water … The response was that ‘crewed yachts’ had been the focus of concern, where ‘social distancing’ could not be observed…

Now, the core of deciding to go afloat in sailing is based on a combination of self-assessment - of safety, responsibility and risk and that has been put forward by Irish Sailing. I understand the problems of ‘close quarters’ aboard a racing or cruising yacht. As the national sailing authority has suggested, however, what about enabling double-handed sailing, households, family sailing, solo sailing. They should surely be considered, otherwise, a season of little opportunity is ahead.

"overall decisions about local sailing are on hold depending upon what arises from Irish Sailing’s updated plan"

From clubs around the South this week the only positive indicator was that the annual Cobh-to-Blackrock Race, always a well-patronised event, has the best prospect of going ahead because it is not scheduled until September. Decisions are awaited in regard to Glandore Classic Boats in July, but the present uncertainty may affect overseas entrants. Calves Week is still scheduled for August, but overall decisions about local sailing are on hold depending upon what arises from Irish Sailing’s updated plan.

Chief Executive Harry Hermon told me that “the anticipation is that we will be able to go afloat to some degree in Phase 1 of restrictions.”

Hopefully, that will happen but, while not being critical of canoeing as a sport, I’d like to see to more recognition from the Department of Sport of the strong support for sailing and its widespread opportunities.

Listen to the podcast below:

Published in Tom MacSweeney
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Marine Science Perhaps it is the work of the Irish research vessel RV Celtic Explorer out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of marine research, development and sustainable management, through which Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. From Wavebob Ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration these pages document the work of Irish marine science and how Irish scientists have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

 

At A Glance – Ocean Facts

  • 71% of the earth’s surface is covered by the ocean
  • The ocean is responsible for the water cycle, which affects our weather
  • The ocean absorbs 30% of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity
  • The real map of Ireland has a seabed territory ten times the size of its land area
  • The ocean is the support system of our planet.
  • Over half of the oxygen we breathe was produced in the ocean
  • The global market for seaweed is valued at approximately €5.4 billion
  • · Coral reefs are among the oldest ecosystems in the world — at 230 million years
  • 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast in Ireland
  • Ocean waters hold nearly 20 million tons of gold. If we could mine all of the gold from the ocean, we would have enough to give every person on earth 9lbs of the precious metal!
  • Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world – Ireland is ranked 7th largest aquaculture producer in the EU
  • The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean in the world, covering 20% of the earth’s surface. Out of all the oceans, the Atlantic Ocean is the saltiest
  • The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean in the world. It’s bigger than all the continents put together
  • Ireland is surrounded by some of the most productive fishing grounds in Europe, with Irish commercial fish landings worth around €200 million annually
  • 97% of the earth’s water is in the ocean
  • The ocean provides the greatest amount of the world’s protein consumed by humans
  • Plastic affects 700 species in the oceans from plankton to whales.
  • Only 10% of the oceans have been explored.
  • 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year, equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic into the ocean every minute.
  • 12 humans have walked on the moon but only 3 humans have been to the deepest part of the ocean.

(Ref: Marine Institute)

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