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Marine Science
Another CGI image angle of newbuild RV Tom Crean, where the aft deck is where all the action is to take place in carrying out a whole host of oceanagraphy marine research using state of the art equipment as outlined below. Note the port of registry is Galway, the newbuild's homeport.
As Afloat first highlighted the Marine Institute's name of RV Tom Crean chosen for the new €25m research vessel due for delivery in Autumn 2022, is to feature a suite of the latest state of the art technology equipment, writes…
Marine Institute Celebrates Women in Science
The Marine Institute is celebrating the International Day of Women and Girls in Science on 11th February 2021, by highlighting the many brilliant women who play transformative and ambitious roles in understanding, exploring, protecting and sustainably managing the wealth of…
Explorers Education Programme Launches ‘We Love the Ocean’ Facts to Inspire Fun Activities at Home
The Marine Institute’s Explorers Education Programme team are getting ready for the season of love by launching a series of fascinating facts about the ocean. “Making personal connections and hearing stories about what we love to do at home and…
Ireland's new 52.8-metre modern research vessel, the Tom Crean
Ireland’s new marine research vessel will be named the RV Tom Crean. Due to be completed in summer 2022, the new state-of-the-art multi-purpose marine research vessel will carry out a wide range of marine research activities, including vital fisheries, climate…
AFLOAT exclusively reveals the ship's name of the Marine Institute's new research vessel is to be the RV Tom Crean, in honour of the Irishman's considerable seafaring and polar expedition achievements in Antractica of more than a century ago.
A Norwegian naval architect consultancy that has designed the Marine Institute's new research vessel, Afloat.ie reveals is to be named RV Tom Crean after the Irish seaman and polar explorer in Antarctica, writes Jehan Ashmore. The name chosen for the…
Students sort shellfish on a previous Science@Sea survey
The call is now open for Marine Institute SMART Research Vessel Bursaries 2021 — but applicants must act fast, as the closing date for the first survey is this coming Tuesday 2 February. This year up to 20 bursaries are…
County Kerry’s Valentia Island is examining the feasibility of combining offshore wind with electrolyser technology to convert water to hydrogen
Using green hydrogen to supply island energy needs is the theme of several projects which Irish offshore communities and universities are involved in. A consortium of Irish islands led by Kerry’s Valentia Island Co-op and Rathlin, Co Antrim is examining…
‘Ireland’s Blubber Book’ — A New Educational Resource for Young & Aspiring Marine Biologists
The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group (IWDG) has announced a new educational resource for young and aspiring marine science experts. Ireland’s Blubber Book: Flukes Junior Vol 1 is a comprehensive workbook on cetaceans – the marine wildlife family comprising whales, dolphins and…
Marine Institute’s 2020 Stock Book Assesses 74 Key Fish Stocks
The Marine Institute’s 2020 Stock Book is now available online and via an interactive online application. Every year the Marine Institute produces an overview of scientific assessments and advice on 74 key fish stocks of interest to Ireland. The Stock…
Diver Owen O'Connell examines the cultch post deployment in south Galway Bay
“Good news everyone”, the natives have returned...” It’s not your average title to a scientific paper, but this one has reason to celebrate - hailing the return of native oysters to Belfast Lough after a century. The paper by Bangor…
Oceans of Online Learning Resources For Home-Schooling Families
Families schooling their children at home during the January lockdown can find a wealth of free online activities and resources from the Marine Institute’s Oceans of Learning series. According to Marine Institute chief executive Dr Paul Connolly, the series “highlights…
Back to the Source: Saving Europe's Biodiversity Starts in the Ocean
A coalition of environmental groups says there are “key marine policy gaps” in the EU’s Biodiversity Strategy 2030. “Tangible and binding” actions must be taken to ensure the proposed biodiversity strategy ensures “the long-term health” of oceans, the group of…
Stella Turk, MBE at work in Shang-ri La, her cottage in Camborne
The work of a marine scientist and conservationist who pioneered a response to the Torrey Canyon supertanker environmental disaster of 1967 has been marked by the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. The late Stella Turk, a leading expert on molluscs…
The Marine Institute Headquarters, at Rinville in Galway
The Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine invites applications from suitably qualified candidates to fill four vacancies on the board of the Marine Institute. Candidates must have demonstrable experience relevant to the work of the Institute in one or…
The European flat oyster Ostrea edulis was last recorded in Belfast Lough in the Victorian era
Marine scientists have been baffled by the unexpected return of wild oysters to Belfast Lough, as the Guardian reports. The threatened shellfish species was last recorded in the Northern Ireland lough in the late 1800s before overfishing destroyed the native population.…
The wave buoy is  deployed in Brandon Bay on the 1, December 2020
A research project led by coastal and ocean scientists in NUI Galway and the Marine Institute involves the deployment of a combination of smart buoys and time-lapse imaging to measure storm impacts and support the development of coastal flood and…

Marine Science Perhaps it is the work of the Irish research vessel RV Celtic Explorer out in the Atlantic Ocean that best highlights the essential nature of marine research, development and sustainable management, through which Ireland is developing a strong and well-deserved reputation as an emerging centre of excellence. From Wavebob Ocean energy technology to aquaculture to weather buoys and oil exploration these pages document the work of Irish marine science and how Irish scientists have secured prominent roles in many European and international marine science bodies.

 

At A Glance – Ocean Facts

  • 71% of the earth’s surface is covered by the ocean
  • The ocean is responsible for the water cycle, which affects our weather
  • The ocean absorbs 30% of the carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere by human activity
  • The real map of Ireland has a seabed territory ten times the size of its land area
  • The ocean is the support system of our planet.
  • Over half of the oxygen we breathe was produced in the ocean
  • The global market for seaweed is valued at approximately €5.4 billion
  • · Coral reefs are among the oldest ecosystems in the world — at 230 million years
  • 1.9 million people live within 5km of the coast in Ireland
  • Ocean waters hold nearly 20 million tons of gold. If we could mine all of the gold from the ocean, we would have enough to give every person on earth 9lbs of the precious metal!
  • Aquaculture is the fastest growing food sector in the world – Ireland is ranked 7th largest aquaculture producer in the EU
  • The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean in the world, covering 20% of the earth’s surface. Out of all the oceans, the Atlantic Ocean is the saltiest
  • The Pacific Ocean is the largest ocean in the world. It’s bigger than all the continents put together
  • Ireland is surrounded by some of the most productive fishing grounds in Europe, with Irish commercial fish landings worth around €200 million annually
  • 97% of the earth’s water is in the ocean
  • The ocean provides the greatest amount of the world’s protein consumed by humans
  • Plastic affects 700 species in the oceans from plankton to whales.
  • Only 10% of the oceans have been explored.
  • 8 million tonnes of plastic enter the ocean each year, equal to dumping a garbage truck of plastic into the ocean every minute.
  • 12 humans have walked on the moon but only 3 humans have been to the deepest part of the ocean.

(Ref: Marine Institute)

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