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Displaying items by tag: Met Eireann

#WaveRecord - The waves just keep getting higher off Ireland's coast!

Following our report in January this year that the M3 weather buoy measured the second highest wave off the West Cork coast comes news of an even bigger swell just a few weeks later.

Met Éireann's Columba Creamer informs us of a maximum individual wave height of 21.91 metres recorded on the night of Monday 23 February.

That's more than two metres clear of the previous record set by the MM3 weather buoy in January 2013, and marks the fourth highest wave recorded across Ireland's buoy network.

But there's more, as Monday 26 January saw Ireland's biggest ever wave – a 23.44-metre whopper – recorded by the M4 buoy off Donegal.

Creamer – Met Éireann's port meteorological officer, who quality controls data streams from Ireland's buoy network – says the four Fugro buoys (labelled M2, M3, M4 and M5) measure significant wave height, individual wave height, swell height, wind wave height, period and direction for each wave type.

Published in Coastal Notes

#Weather - Met Éireann says a Status Yellow weather warning is in effect for Ireland's coastal waters as the remains of Hurricane Gonzalo are set to sweep over the country from tonight (Monday 20 October).

Mariners are warned to take care as southwesterly gusts and gales are expected to develop this evening, turning northwesterly later tonight and bringing with them heavy rainfall and severe squalls in some areas, particularly in the north and northeast.

Published in Weather

#wave – A new maximum wave height measuring nearly 80–feet (23 metres) has been recorded in weekend storms off the coast of Ireland.

Monster waves the height of five double deck buses occurred during last weekend's ferocious storms off the coast of Donegal, the worst for 30 years, according to Donegal news sources.

The M4 weather buoy, located off the Northwest coast, recorded a new maximum individual wave height of 23.4 metres at 15.00 on Sunday 26th January 2014 during the weekend storm that prompted an orange alert by the Coast Guard.

The new wave measurement easily surpasses the previous record of 20.4 metres at the same location in December 2011, according to Met Eireann.

The M4 buoy is one of a new generation of weather buoys with the ability to measure maximum wave height as well as the more usual Significant Wave Height.

The Significant Wave Height is defined as the average height of the highest one-third of the waves and that is what our forecasts of wave height refer to.

In general, the highest wave of all will be about twice the Significant Wave Height.

There was also a record for maximum significant wave height for the M4 buoy of 15.3m at the same time, with the previous record being 14.7m. The all-time record for Significant Wave Height still rests with the M6 buoy of 17.2m.

more from Met Eireann on this story here

Published in Weather
Tagged under

#storm – Met Eireann have issued a 'status red' weather warning for Western and Northwestern counties, Galway, Mayo, Sligo, Leitrim and Donegal.

Storms will develop later today, with strong south to southwest winds expected over those counties, with damaging gusts of 120 to 150 km/h this afternoon and evening. This will also lead to very high seas.

 

Published in Weather
Tagged under

#Weather - Met Éireann has developed a new smartphone app providing up-to-date weather forecasts for those on the go - especially on the water.

The new app features the latest reports, radar information and satellite imagery with both local and provincial forecasts, with specific forecasts tailored to Ireland's sea area and inland lakes, coastal reports and ferry crossings as well as Atlantic charts.

Users can also adapt the app preferences for their specific location and needs, whether you're aiming to go boating in our inland waterways or go fishing off the coast.

The Met Éireann app is now on iTunes to download for the iPhone, and an Android version is also available.

Published in Weather

#MarineInstitute - Keep track on the status of Ireland's coastal waters thanks to the Marine Institute's website, which features live updates from the Irish Marine Weather Buoy Network.

The network is a joint project designed to improve weather forecasts and safety at sea around Ireland. The buoy network provides vital data for weather forecasts, shipping bulletins, gale and swell warnings as well as data for general public information and research.

Data recorded by the six buoys dotted around Ireland's coastal waters, both offshore and far offshore, includes stats on atmospheric pressure, wind speed and direction, wave height and even salinity levels.

The project is the result of successful collaboration between the Marine Institute, the Department of Transport, Met Éireann and the UK Met Office.

Published in Marine Science

#Weather - Met Éireann has issued a 'yellow' weather alert for coastal areas around Ireland today (4 February) as winds are expected to reach speeds of up to 110km/h.

Westerly winds will continue to reach gale force or strong gale force this evening and tonight on all Irish coastal waters and on the Irish Sea.

Severe gusts of 90 to 110 km/h are predicted for Connacht, Donegal and in coastal areas of Munster. Elsewhere winds will gust between 80 and 90 km/hr.

After dark, showers will become increasingly wintry with the possibility of snow and even blizzard-like conditions, especially in the north and west on high ground.

But meteorologists say that any lying snow will melt during the course of tomorrow morning and afternoon as temperatures rise.

Published in Weather

#Weather - The Irish Coast Guard has warned the public to stay away from coastal areas today (Friday 28 December) as high winds are expected to reach speeds of as much as 140km per hour in some exposed areas.

It marks the third weather warning for gale force winds this week, as Met Éireann advises of south to south-west winds developing during the day with gusts of 90-100km per hour.

Exposed parts of Connacht and Donegal are set to face the worst of the storm-force winds, with severe gusts of storm force 10 - 100-140km per hour - expected between 6pm and 9pm on the coast from Slyne Head to Erris Head to Malin Head.

Speaking to The Irish Times, meteorologist John Eagleton suggested the possibility of trees coming down and electrical poles falling as the winds strengthen over the course of the day.

"We will get a blast around the evening time," he said, "and I wouldn't like to be sailing a boat along the west coast during those hours."

Published in Weather

#Weather - Met Éireann has issued a weather warning for tonight (Saturday 22 December) with winds expected to reach up to 110km an hour.

Tonight and tomorrow morning, south-west to west winds are likely to increase in most parts of the country, with mean speeds and gusts that "have the potential to be damaging".

The Irish weather service also reports strong gales on all Irish coastal waters and on the Irish Sea, with winds expected to reach storm force later on coasts from Valentia to Erris Head to Fair Head.

Published in Weather

#WEATHER - Met Éireann has issued a weather warning for much of the Irish coast today (Monday 24 September) as heavy rain and strong northwesterly winds sweep in across the country.

Winds are expected to reach gale force tonight on northwestern, northern and eastern coasts from Erris Head in Mayo to Malin in Donegal to Wicklow Head.

As The Irish Times reports, fishermen in small craft are advised to take caution as wind speeds are set to top force six or higher as the day progresses.

Persistent rainfall in most of Leinster and Ulster may also lead to flash flooding in some areas.

Published in Weather
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Sharks in Irish waters

Irish waters are home to 71 species of shark, skates and rays, 58 of which have been studied in detail and listed on the Ireland Red List of Cartilaginous fish. Irish sharks range from small Sleeper sharks, Dogfish and Catsharks, to larger species like Frilled, Mackerel and Cow sharks, all the way to the second largest shark in the world, the Basking shark. 

Irish waters provide a refuge for an array of shark species. Tralee Bay, Co. Kerry provides a habitat for several rare and endangered sharks and their relatives, including the migratory tope shark, angel shark and undulate ray. This area is also the last European refuge for the extremely rare white skate. Through a European Maritime and Fisheries Fund (EMFF) project, Marine Institute scientists have been working with fishermen to assess the distribution, diversity, and monthly relative abundance of skates and rays in Tralee, Brandon and Dingle Bays.

“These areas off the southwest coast of Ireland are important internationally as they hold some of the last remaining refuges for angel shark and white skate,” said Dr Maurice Clarke of the Marine Institute. “This EMFF project has provided data confirming the critically endangered status of some species and provides up-to-date information for the development of fishery measures to eliminate by-catch.” 

Irish waters are also home to the Black Mouthed Catshark, Galeus melastomus, one of Ireland’s smallest shark species which can be found in the deep sea along the continental shelf. In 2018, Irish scientists discovered a very rare shark-nursery 200 nautical miles off the west coast by the Marine Institute’s ROV Holland 1 on a shelf sloping to 750 metres deep. 

There are two ways that sharks are born, either as live young or from egg casings. In the ‘case’ of Black Mouthed Catsharks, the nursery discovered in 2018, was notable by the abundance of egg casings or ‘mermaid’s purses’. Many sharks, rays and skate lay eggs, the cases of which often wash ashore. If you find an egg casing along the seashore, take a photo for Purse Search Ireland, a citizen science project focusing on monitoring the shark, ray and skate species around Ireland.

Another species also found by Irish scientists using the ROV Holland 1 in 2018 was a very rare type of dogfish, the Sail Fin Rough Shark, Oxynotus paradoxus. These sharks are named after their long fins which resemble the trailing sails of a boat, and live in the deep sea in waters up to 750m deep. Like all sharks, skates and rays, they have no bones. Their skeleton is composed of cartilage, much like what our noses and ears are made from! This material is much more flexible and lighter than bone which is perfect for these animals living without the weight of gravity.

Throughout history sharks have been portrayed as the monsters of the sea, a concept that science is continuously debunking. Basking sharks were named in 1765 as Cetorhinus maximus, roughly translated to the ‘big-nosed sea monster’. Basking sharks are filter feeders, often swimming with their mouths agape, they filter plankton from the water.

They are very slow moving and like to bask in the sun in shallow water and are often seen in Irish waters around Spring and early Summer. To help understand the migration of these animals to be better able to understand and conserve these species, the Irish Basking Shark Group have tagged and mapped their travels.

Remarkably, many sharks like the Angel Shark, Squatina squatina have the ability to sense electricity. They do this via small pores in their skin called the ‘Ampullae of Lorenzini’ which are able to detect the tiny electrical impulses of a fish breathing, moving or even its heartbeat from distances of over a kilometre! Angel sharks, often referred to as Monkfish have a distinctively angelic shape, with flattened, large fins appearing like the wings of an angel. They live on the seafloor in the coastal waters of Ireland and much like a cat are nocturnal, primarily active at night.

The intricate complexity of shark adaptations is particularly noticeable in the texture of their skin. Composed of miniscule, perfectly shaped overlapping scales, the skin of shark provides them with protection. Often shark scales have been compared to teeth due to their hard enamel structure. They are strong, but also due to their intricate shape, these scales reduce drag and allow water to glide past them so that the shark can swim more effortlessly and silently. This natural flawless design has been used as inspiration for new neoprene fabric designs to help swimmers glide through the water. Although all sharks have this feature, the Leafscale Gulper Shark, Centrophorus squamosus, found in Ireland are specifically named due to the ornate leaf-shape of their scales.