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Displaying items by tag: Paul O'Regan

Brexit, Covid-19 and the situation of seafarers who have been unable to take their leave since the pandemic hit – these are just some of the challenges facing harbourmasters in ports around the island.

Cork harbour, which is being transformed with a new all-tide container terminal at Ringaskiddy and a linking motorway, is handling more direct Ireland-France ferry links with three new weekly freight-only sailings by Brittany Ferries.

Covid-19 has hit tourist traffic, but Cork is handling new freight routes including a weekly service to Zeebrugge.

Two new Liebherr post-Panamax size ship-to-shore (STS) container gantry cranes make an impressive sight cutting the Cork Harbour skyline at the Cork Container Terminal (CCT) in the Republic of Ireland. Port of Cork took delivery of the gantry cranes at the terminal in February last year. The cranes improve liners’ schedule reliability and reduce trade costs and inventory holding outlays for shippers.Two new Liebherr post-Panamax size ship-to-shore (STS) container gantry cranes make an impressive sight cutting the Cork Harbour skyline at the Cork Container Terminal (CCT) in the Republic of Ireland. Port of Cork took delivery of the gantry cranes at the terminal in February last year. The cranes improve liners’ schedule reliability and reduce trade costs and inventory holding outlays for shippers

Last year, Independent Container Line (ICL) introduced a new weekly direct service from Cork to North America - providing Ireland with its first direct container service to the US in many years.

The new direct cargo service to the US east coast from Port Of Cork Independent Vision first arrived at the Port last June The new direct cargo service to the US east coast from Port Of Cork Independent Vision first arrived at the Port last June Photo: Port of Cork/Twitter

A recent report - entitled Cork Harbour 2025: Ready to Float - calls for Cork to be earmarked as a renewable energy service hub for the Celtic Sea.

"Plans for the extension of the deepwater berth in Ringaskiddy could add significant capacity to the capabilities on offer in Cork harbour in support of the nascent floating wind boom in the Celtic Sea,” the report by Cork and Cobh chambers of commerce and a number of companies in the renewable energy sector states.

Progress continues on the development of the new Port of Cork terminal with the two new Liebherr post-Panamax size ship-to-shore (STS) container gantry cranes (left) and Pont Aven ferry in berth (right) Photo: Bob BatemanProgress continues on the development of the new Port of Cork terminal with the two new Liebherr post-Panamax size ship-to-shore (STS) container gantry cranes (left) and Pont Aven ferry in berth (right) Photo: Bob Bateman

Port of Cork harbourmaster Capt Paul O’Regan spoke to Wavelengths in the first of an occasional series on ports, and you can hear him below

 
Read more on the Port of Cork in Afloat's dedicated section here and Cork Harbour section here
Published in Wavelength Podcast
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ESB’s 2040 strategy Driven to Make a Difference: Net Zero by 2040 sets out a clear roadmap for ESB to achieve net zero emissions by 2040. 

ESB will develop and connect renewable energy to decarbonise the electricity system by 2040. ESB will invest in the development of new renewable generation, including onshore and offshore wind and solar, and will significantly increase the amount of renewable generation connected to our electricity networks.

ESB will:

  • Deliver more than a fivefold increase in our renewable generation portfolio to 5,000MW.
  • Reduce carbon intensity of generation fleet from 414 to 140gCO2/kWh by 2030.
  • Decarbonise 63% of our generation output by 2030 and 100% by 2040 (up from c20% now).

Offshore wind

ESB know the importance of offshore wind in tackling climate change and delivering net zero. Ireland has a unique capability given its prime location to take advantage of the potential of offshore wind. ESB are working hard to develop offshore wind projects for the benefit of everyone across society in Ireland and the UK. This includes ongoing engagement with marine users and local communities so ESB can deliver these significant projects.

Offshore wind will play a major role globally in our fight against climate change. It will help to replace energy generated by burning fossil fuels with that from a clean, safe and secure renewable energy source. Ireland’s geographic location on the exposed edge of the Atlantic presents us with a significant opportunity to generate electricity from wind – both offshore and onshore.

Power from onshore wind farms currently provide over one-third of Ireland’s electricity needs. But, whilst its marine area is many times the size of its landmass, Ireland’s offshore wind potential is only starting to be realised. ESB have a coastline stretching over 3,000km but only one operational offshore wind farm – Arklow Bank, with a capacity of 25 MW. In contrast, Belgium’s coastline is only 63km long, but it has already developed more than 2,000 MW of offshore wind. In Great Britain, with a coastline four times the length of ours, offshore wind generation now equates to over 440 Arklow Banks, with an installed capacity of 11,0000 MW as of late 2021.

The Irish Government's target to install 5,000 MW of offshore wind capacity in our maritime area by 2030 is set out in the Climate Action Plan 2021. It also has the objective to source 80% of Ireland’s electricity needs from renewables by the same year. In line with this, ESB is applying its professional and proven engineering expertise to the challenges set within the Climate Action Plan.

ESB are committed to playing a strong role in developing Ireland’s offshore wind potential for the benefit of the people of Ireland. This will be done in consultation with marine users and local communities, and with due care for the marine environment.