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Displaying items by tag: Wicklow

Both Wicklow RNLI lifeboats were launched at teatime on Friday evening (14 July) following reports of a dog in the water south of Wicklow harbour.

The alarm was raised by gardaí in Wicklow who were concerned that the dog owners would instinctively try to rescue their pet and risk injury.

At 6.32pm the inshore lifeboat launched and was followed a short time later by the all-weather lifeboat. Both proceeded south to the foot of cliffs at Wicklow Golf Course.

The inshore lifeboat was on scene four minutes after launching in a position 200m south of Travelahawk beach.

In challenging sea conditions, helm Alan Goucher was able to get the lifeboat ashore and locate the dog.

The inshore lifeboat volunteers made repeated attempts to retrieve the dog, but it retreated into caves on the shoreline each time.

Eventually the dog made its own way back up the cliff where it was retrieved by its anxious owners. With the dog back in safe hands, the lifeboat crews were stood down by the coastguard and returned to station.

The call-out was a milestone for trainee Liz Thomas as she went to sea on her first ‘shout’ as an all-weather lifeboat volunteer.

Speaking after the call-out, Wicklow RNLI press officer Tommy Dover said: “We were happy to help and would remind dog owners to ensure to look after their own personal safety and do not get into danger trying to attempt a rescue themselves.

“Always keep your dog on a lead when you’re close to cliff edges or fast -lowing rivers. Don’t go after your dog if they go into the water. If you are worried about your dog, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

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While Wicklow RNLI's volunteer crew were undergoing assessments on Wednesday evening (5 July), they were requested by the Irish Coast Guard to go to the assistance of a 40ft yacht with five people onboard which had lost all power on the Codling Bank.

The all-weather lifeboat Ruth and David Arthur had launched on exercise at 7pm under the command of coxswain Alan Goucher with five crew members and an RNLI assessor trainer onboard.

During the assessment, shortly after 8.30pm the lifeboat was diverted to go to the assistance of the yacht which was losing all power and had three crew who were suffering quite badly from sea sickness.

The assessment was quickly and safely brought to a finish and the crew made their best speed to the casualty near the Codling Bank, some 10 miles to the east of Wicklow Harbour. It was established that the casualty vessel had lost all power, had become unable to use its VHF radio and had no lighting.

Given the loss of power, the seasick crew and closing darkness, the coxswain decided to take the vessel under tow and make way for the nearest safe port at Wicklow Harbour.

Conditions on scene were described as blowing a southwesterly Force 4-5 wind with up to a one-metre swell.

The tow took approximately three hours, with the casualty vessel being safely secured alongside shortly after midnight. The crew of the casualty vessel were brought into the lifeboat station to be looked after while transport was arranged to bring them to their destination.

The incomplete parts of the assessment will now be rescheduled for another date.

Speaking after the call-out, Goucher said: “The crew were incredibly professional. The change in mindset from assessment to rescue happened instantly, allowing for a successful rescue. I look forward to the crew completing their assessments at a future date.”

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Three fishermen were brought to safety by Wicklow RNLI on Tuesday afternoon (27 June), after their 14-metre vessel got into difficulties ten miles northeast of Wicklow harbour.

The RNLI relief fleet all-weather lifeboat RNLB Ruth and David Arthur put to sea shortly before 11.45 am under the command of Coxswain Ciaran Doyle and a volunteer crew, following a launch request from the Coast Guard.

The alarm was raised after the skipper reported that his fishing vessel was fouled in ropes anchored to the seabed near the Codling Bank and required assistance.

Wicklow lifeboat was alongside the fishing vessel one hour after launching. Conditions on scene were wind south southeast force 4-5 with moderate sea.

The lifeboat crew were able to free the fishing vessel from the rope obstruction, but rope remained tangled in the propeller.

Speaking after the callout, Coxswain Ciaran Doyle said: ‘As the vessel was unable to return to port under its own power the only option was to take it in tow.’

A tow line was established at 12.35pm and course was set for Wicklow harbour. The fishing vessel was secured alongside the Packet pier just after 3pm and the three fishermen were landed safely ashore.

The lifeboat returned to station where trainee Nathan ‘O Connor went ashore after completing his first callout as an RNLI volunteer.

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Both Wicklow RNLI Inshore and all-weather lifeboats launched this afternoon (Sunday, 25 June) after the Irish Coast Guard received a distress call on Marine VHF Channel 16, reporting an 8-metre racing yacht had capsized during a squall in Wicklow bay, and one person was trapped under a sail.

The Inshore lifeboat launched at 4.10 pm and was on scene two minutes later. Weather conditions in the area were poor at the time as a thunder and lightning storm with strong gusting wind and rain passed overhead.

Speaking after the call-out RNLI Helm Alan Goucher said: ’As we approached the partially submerged vessel, five people were visible in the water. We recovered four, but the fifth person was tangled in the rigging, so lifeboat volunteer Peter Byrne entered the water and managed to free the person from the obstruction.’

With the five sailors safely onboard the Inshore lifeboat, they were landed ashore at Wicklow lifeboat station and handed into the care of a NAS Paramedic for a medical assessment. Thankfully they required no further treatment.

The all-weather lifeboat under the command of Coxswain Nick Keogh stood by the sinking yacht and placed a marker buoy on the section still visible above water. They were stood down by the Coast Guard shortly after 5pm and returned to station.

Commenting on the callout, Wicklow RNLI Press officer Tommy Dover said:’ This was a fast response by our volunteers today, who assembled and launched within minutes following the pager alert. It was also the first ‘Shout’ for our trainees Derek Byrne and Robbie Quinn as they kitted up on their first callout on the all-weather lifeboat.’

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Wicklow RNLI brought three fishermen to safety on Wednesday Morning (7th June) after their vessel developed mechanical problems twelve miles northeast of Wicklow Harbour.

The all-weather lifeboat RNLB Ruth and David Arthur slipped its mooring at 10.45 am to reports of a fishing boat with engine failure. The lifeboat was under the command of Coxswain Nick Keogh.

The volunteer lifeboat crew located the casualty vessel forty minutes after launching in a position 12 miles northeast of Wicklow Harbour. Conditions on scene were wind from a north easterly direction force 4-5, with moderate choppy seas and good visibility.

After an assessment of the situation was carried out by Coxswain Keogh it was decided a tow was the best option given the casualty vessels engine failure.

The tow was established, and a course set for Wicklow Harbour with the casualty vessel being secured alongside at 1.45pm.

The All-Weather Lifeboat was then made ready for the next callout.

This was the first callout for RNLB Ruth and David Arthur in Wicklow. It is based in Wicklow temporarily while RNLB Joanna & Henry Williams receives some planned maintenance work.

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Wicklow RNLI brought three fishermen to safety on Saturday afternoon (29 May), after their vessel developed mechanical problems three miles east of Greystones Harbour.

The all-weather lifeboat RNLB Joanna & Henry Williams slipped its mooring at 3.43 pm to reports of an angling boat with engine failure. The lifeboat was under the command of Coxswain Nick Keogh.

The volunteer lifeboat crew located the casualty vessel forty minutes after launching in a position four miles east southeast of Greystones Harbour. Conditions on scene were wind from a south easterly direction force 3-4, with moderate seas and good visibility.

After an assessment of the situation was carried out by Coxswain Keogh, it was decided a tow was the best option given the casualty vessel's engine failure.

Speaking after the callout, Nick Keogh said, “As Greystones Harbour was the nearest safe harbour, I decided this was the best place to bring the casualty”.

The tow was established, and a course set for Greystones Harbour with the casualty vessel being secured alongside at 4.53 pm. Greystones Coast Guard unit was also there to help secure the vessel alongside.

At 4.56pm the All-Weather Lifeboat left Greystones, and arrived back in Wicklow Harbour at 5.30 pm where the boat was made ready for the next callout.

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Wicklow RNLI all-weather lifeboat RNLB Joanna and Henry Williams was called out to assist a lone sailor on Thursday afternoon (13 April) after his vessel suffered steering failure.

The lifeboat slipped its moorings from the south quay at 2:50 pm following a crew pager alert and proceeded to sea under the command of Coxswain Ciaran Doyle and a volunteer crew.

Twelve minutes later the casualty vessel was located one-mile south-east of Wicklow Head Lighthouse. Visibility in the area was good with westerly wind force four and moderate sea.

The lone sailor on the 11-metre yacht was on passage from Dublin to Kerry and was passing Wicklow Head lighthouse when the steering failed. He then contacted the Coast Guard and asked for assistance.

Speaking after the callout, Coxswain Ciaran Doyle said, ‘We carried out a quick assessment of the vessel and as it had no steering, the only viable option was to tow the yacht back to Wicklow port. Alan Goucher was also transferred onto the yacht to assist the sailor while the boat was under tow.’

The yacht was secured alongside the East pier just before 4 pm and the sailor was landed safely ashore.

Speaking about the call out, Wicklow RNLI Press Officer, Tommy Dover said: ‘The sailor today was well equipped and was able to contact the Coast Guard for assistance; when going afloat we would remind everyone to check their engine and fuel, always wear a lifejacket or buoyancy aid, and carry a means of calling for help. If you see someone in difficulty on or near the water, dial 999 and ask for the Coast Guard.’

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Getting Wicklow RNLI lifeboat to a casualty and getting them home is the basis of what Lifeboat volunteers do, but when there is an ill or injured person to care for, what kind of training do RNLI have for that?

A group of eleven of volunteer crew took on the challenge of learning the skills, procedures and techniques required to pass the RNLI’s rigorous Casualty Care training course. They gave up approximately 30 hours of their time over the course of two weeks to enable them to complete the training successfully. Wicklow RNLI welcomed Stephen O’Flaherty of RNLI Casualty Care Trainer to the station to conduct the training.

A group of eleven Wicklow RNI crew took on the challenge of learning the skills, procedures and techniques required to pass the RNLI’s rigorous Casualty Care training courseA group of eleven Wicklow RNI crew took on the challenge of learning the skills, procedures and techniques required to pass the RNLI’s rigorous Casualty Care training course

The course is designed to enable crew to provide correct and effective care to a casualty until such time as they can be handed over to the expert care of paramedics or doctors.

Sometimes the care given takes place in hostile and unrelenting conditions adding an extra layer of complexity to the training required by volunteers.

The training revolves around hands on practical applications rather than concentrating on complex theory. The RNLI employ the use of check cards to assist its volunteers in carrying out the proper care. This allows the crew to concentrate on the practical application of Casualty Care without having to try and remember complex procedures in the middle of a difficult rescue.

During the training each crewmember must pass practical and written assessments to demonstrate their own individual skills. The final part of the assessments involves the crewmembers working in pods together to asses and treat a casualty in a practical scenario.

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Three fishermen were brought to safety by Wicklow RNLI on Tuesday evening (21 February) after their vessel developed mechanical problems seven miles south of Wicklow port.

The all-weather lifeboat RNLB Joanna and Henry Williams slipped its moorings at 5.20 pm from the South Quay as darkness fell and put to sea under the command of Coxswain Nick Keogh.

The lifeboat crew located the fishing vessel fifteen minutes after launching five miles east of Wicklow Head. Conditions in the area at the time were wind southerly in direction force 4, with a moderate sea and good visibility.

Coxswain Keogh carried out a quick assessment on the 18-metre vessel, it was found that the steering had locked, and this was preventing the fishermen from getting back to port under their own power. Their only option was to drop anchor and call for assistance.

A tow line was established, and the course was set for Wicklow harbour. The fishing vessel was brought alongside the East pier at 7.20 pm and the three fishermen were landed safely ashore.

Speaking about the call out, volunteer Lifeboat Press Officer for Wicklow RNLI, Tommy Dover said: ‘This was a quick response by the crew this evening, which resulted in three fishermen coming ashore safely. It was also the first ‘Shout’ for Ian Thompson as a new navigator, the role is very important at sea, where time is important and accurate headings are required to ensure the lifeboat gets to a casualty as quickly as possible; we were delighted he recently qualified as an all-weather lifeboat navigator after completing a rigorous training programme.’

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John Sillery, the long-serving Head Launcher at Wicklow Lifeboat Station, has retired after 34 years of dedicated service to the RNLI.

John joined the RNLI on New Year’s Day 1989 as a volunteer winch operator. He was appointed head launcher at Wicklow and took charge on the slip of all launching and recovery activities for the all-weather Tyne class lifeboat RNLB Annie Blaker.

John Sillery Photo: RNLI/Nigel MillardJohn Sillery Photo: RNLI/Nigel Millard

In lifeboat history, John will be remembered for launching the last operation Tyne Class slipway lifeboat in the RNLI fleet, at 1:30pm on Sunday 28 April 2019 to the sound of loud applause, John Sillery, struck the pin which released the Annie Blaker down the slipway and into the water for the final time, ending an era that spanned over three decades at Wicklow and signalling the retirement of the last Tyne class lifeboat from the RNLI fleet.

2019 saw the arrival of the new Shannon class lifeboat at Wicklow and the same year John Sillery received his Long Service Award from the RNLI. This was in recognition for his commitment and dedication to the charity that saves lives at sea.

With the arrival of the new Shannon class lifeboat, John was responsible for launching and recovering operations at the South Quay berth.

To mark John’s retirement, family, friends and lifeboat crew gathered at the Wicklow Golf Club to celebrate his long service as a volunteer

Wicklow RNLI Operation’s Manager, Mary Aldridge paid tribute to John’s commitment over the past 34 years. Flowers were also presented to Maria Sillery, John’s wife, a token to say thank you for supporting John and sharing him with us over the years. Coxswain Nick Keogh also presented John with a specially commissioned lamp in the shape of a lighthouse, a gift from the crew to say thank you.

John Sillery with his wife Maria and family at the retirement party in the Wicklow Golf Club Photo: Tommy Dover/RNLIJohn Sillery with his wife Maria and family at the retirement party in the Wicklow Golf Club Photo: Tommy Dover/RNLI

We are indebted to John for his service at Wicklow RNLI. Since 1989 he has launched the lifeboat countless times that resulted in the saving of many lives along the Wicklow coast.

Second Coxswain Ciaran Doyle best described John during a speech on the night saying “John Sillery was Solid as a rock; he was always the first person to arrive at the station during a shout ready to launch the lifeboat. Thank you for the years.”

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ESB’s 2040 strategy Driven to Make a Difference: Net Zero by 2040 sets out a clear roadmap for ESB to achieve net zero emissions by 2040. 

ESB will develop and connect renewable energy to decarbonise the electricity system by 2040. ESB will invest in the development of new renewable generation, including onshore and offshore wind and solar, and will significantly increase the amount of renewable generation connected to our electricity networks.

ESB will:

  • Deliver more than a fivefold increase in our renewable generation portfolio to 5,000MW.
  • Reduce carbon intensity of generation fleet from 414 to 140gCO2/kWh by 2030.
  • Decarbonise 63% of our generation output by 2030 and 100% by 2040 (up from c20% now).

Offshore wind

ESB know the importance of offshore wind in tackling climate change and delivering net zero. Ireland has a unique capability given its prime location to take advantage of the potential of offshore wind. ESB are working hard to develop offshore wind projects for the benefit of everyone across society in Ireland and the UK. This includes ongoing engagement with marine users and local communities so ESB can deliver these significant projects.

Offshore wind will play a major role globally in our fight against climate change. It will help to replace energy generated by burning fossil fuels with that from a clean, safe and secure renewable energy source. Ireland’s geographic location on the exposed edge of the Atlantic presents us with a significant opportunity to generate electricity from wind – both offshore and onshore.

Power from onshore wind farms currently provide over one-third of Ireland’s electricity needs. But, whilst its marine area is many times the size of its landmass, Ireland’s offshore wind potential is only starting to be realised. ESB have a coastline stretching over 3,000km but only one operational offshore wind farm – Arklow Bank, with a capacity of 25 MW. In contrast, Belgium’s coastline is only 63km long, but it has already developed more than 2,000 MW of offshore wind. In Great Britain, with a coastline four times the length of ours, offshore wind generation now equates to over 440 Arklow Banks, with an installed capacity of 11,0000 MW as of late 2021.

The Irish Government's target to install 5,000 MW of offshore wind capacity in our maritime area by 2030 is set out in the Climate Action Plan 2021. It also has the objective to source 80% of Ireland’s electricity needs from renewables by the same year. In line with this, ESB is applying its professional and proven engineering expertise to the challenges set within the Climate Action Plan.

ESB are committed to playing a strong role in developing Ireland’s offshore wind potential for the benefit of the people of Ireland. This will be done in consultation with marine users and local communities, and with due care for the marine environment.