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Displaying items by tag: Wicklow

#Poulaphuca - The remains of an old homestead submerged by the Poulaphuca Reservoir have resurfaced, as RTÉ News reports.

Images captured by the Garda Air Support Unit in Wicklow clearly show the ruins of a house and a piece of farm machinery.

The ‘island’ was revealed by the retreat of reservoir waters in the recent summer drought that saw remarkable archaeological finds nationwide — as well as an ‘ÉIRE’ sign on Bray Head dating from the Second World War.

The farm was one of a number of properties abandoned before the valley was flooded to create Poulaphuca in 1940.

Published in News Update

#RNLI - A small angling boat with one person on board was towed to safety by Wicklow RNLI after it got into difficulty near Wicklow Head on Wednesday evening (8 August).

The angler had earlier departed from Wicklow Port for a day’s fishing along the coast, but was unable to get the engine into gear to return to the harbour.

The inshore lifeboat launched shortly after 6pm with helm Vinnie Mulvihill and crew David O’Leary and Graham Fitzgerald, and located the drifting craft near Wicklow Head eight minutes later. Weather conditions at the scene were calm with a northerly wind force three.

The angling boat was taken in tow back to Wicklow Harbour and the angler was landed safely ashore.

Elsewhere, Clifden RNLI continued what’s been a busy August when the volunteer lifeboat rescued a boy separated from his kayak at Omey Island earlier on Wednesday afternoon.

The youngster and his friend were holidaying on the island in Claddaghduff with their families, who raised the alarm when one of the boys was seen in the water with his friend trying to help him.

Following the coastguard request after 2.30pm, the Atlantic 85 lifeboat launched from Clifden while the D Class lifeboat travelled by road and was launched at Claddaghduff. Winds were Force 6 and gusting to 7 at the time.

When the Atlantic 85 reached the scene, they found people waving from the eastern shore of the island and saw that the two boys involved had made it ashore to another beach in the area, where some other visitors were assisting them.

Clifden RNLI helm Thomas Davis manoeuvred the lifeboat close to the shore and crew member James Mullen then swam to attend to the boys before reuniting them with their families. They were cold and shaken after the ordeal but otherwise unharmed.

Speaking after the callout, Mullen said: “We were really glad to have been able to assist these lads and their families today and always encourage anyone concerned to raise the alarm as quickly as possible.

“Conditions at sea in this area can change rapidly even for experienced water users and we are always on hand to help where we can.”

The RNLI advise all kayakers to always carry a means of calling for help and to keep it in reach at all times.

More recently, Carrybridge RNLI’s rescue water craft and inshore lifeboat Douglas Euan & Kay Richards, were requested to launch by Belfast Coastguard to assist a man who was disorientated whilst navigating Tamlaght Bay in Upper Lough Erne in the early hours of this morning, Friday 10 August.

And Larne RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat and inshore lifeboat crews recently carried out a training exercise to simulate a casualty care and extraction scenario.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Wicklow RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat Annie Blaker launched shortly after 3.10pm yesterday afternoon (Sunday 22 July) after the skipper of a yacht taking on water called for assistance.

The lifeboat — under the command of coxswain Nick Keogh and with mechanic Brendan Copeland and crew Ciaran Doyle, Terry Silvery, Dave O’Leary and Graham Fitzgerald — was alongside the casualty vessel six minutes after launching, one mile north of Wicklow Harbour.

Crew member O’Leary was transferred onto the yacht to assess the boat and help establish a towline.

The yacht was then towed back to Wicklow Harbour without further incident and the two sailors were landed safely ashore on the East Pier at 3.30pm.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#RNLI - Both Wicklow RNLI lifeboats were launched yesterday (Sunday 1 July) to assist two people on an inflatable dinghy near Brittas Bay beach.

The father and son had set off from the popular tourist beach to fish in a small inflatable dinghy but were carried offshore south around Mizzen Head with the wind and tide, and were having difficulties rowing back to land.

Fortunately, the father managed to get the dinghy ashore on an inaccessible beach after much effort.

Onlookers and family members were unable to get down the cliff to help them, so they waited until the inshore lifeboat came ashore at 5.30pm and was able to pick up the stranded man and son.

They were transferred to the all-weather lifeboat a short time later and assessed by lifeboat first aider Carol Flahive.

The Dublin-based Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 116 was also tasked to the incident.

The two casualties were cold and shaken after their ordeal, but required no further medical assistance. They were landed safely back at Wicklow lifeboat station at 6.30pm and were picked up by relieved family members after having a hot drink.

Speaking following the callout, Wicklow RNLI volunteer lifeboat press officer Tommy Dover said: “We would remind everyone planning an activity at sea to always respect the water. Always wear a lifejacket or buoyancy aid. Always carry a means of calling or signalling for help.

“Check the weather and tide times before you go. Tell someone about your plans - where you intend to go and when you expect to return.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - A busy Bank Holiday Sunday (3 June) for RNLI lifeboat callouts began just after 9am, when Baltimore RNLI was tasked to a yacht that ran aground upriver from the West Cork village.

The vessel, with two on board, got into difficulty while trying to navigate the River Ilen near Old Court. Conditions at the time were described as good but the tide was falling.

Baltimore’s inshore lifeboat, with helm John Kearney and crew members Ian Lynch and David Ryan, arrived on scene at 9.27am.

After assessing the situation and checking the area around the vessel for any further navigational hazards, a tow was established and the yacht was pulled clear.

There was no apparent damage to the yacht and no injuries to anyone on board, so they continued on their journey down the river and the lifeboat returned to station.

Later in the morning, Wicklow RNLI launched to a 13m fishing vessel that suffered engine failure off the Wicklow coast.

The all-weather lifeboat Annie Blaker, under the command of coxswain, Nick Keogh launched shortly before 11am and was alongside the stricken vessel 50 minutes later, near Bray Head.

Conditions on scene had a sea state slight, with a south-westerly Force 3 wind and poor visibility due to fog.

Two lifeboat crew members were transferred onto the fishing vessel to assist with establishing a towline and assess one of the three fishermen on board, who was found to have sustained an arm injury. He received first aid and casualty care from Carol Flahive and Alan Goucher as the vessel was towed back to Wicklow harbour.

The fishing vessel was brought safely alongside the South Quay in Wicklow at 2pm and the injured fisherman was handed into the care of an ambulance crew.

A third callout was at Lough Derg on the Shannon, where a cruiser with two on board had run aground at Tullabeg over lunchtime.

The Lough Derg lifeboat was on scene within minutes as the crew were already in the area on exercise.

Once established that the boat had no structural damage and the two people on board were fine, the vessel was towed into deeper water to allow its journey to continue.

“With the good weather continuing there are a lot more people on the water,” Lough Derg RNLI helm Owen Cavanagh said. “We would always advise to plan any water-based activity well in advance and if out on a boat to make proper preparations for the trip, including taking the correct equipment and keeping a close eye on the surroundings.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Baltimore RNLI carried out a medevac on Saturday night (12 May) from Cape Clear Island off the coast of West Cork.

The volunteer crew were requested to launch their all-weather lifeboat by the Irish Coast Guard at 8.05pm to provide medical assistance and evacuation to a man working on the island.

Arriving in Cape Clear at 8.24pm, the RNLI volunteers transferred the casualty onto the lifeboat and returned him to Baltimore lifeboat station, whee he was handed over to the care of a waiting HSE ambulance crew.

Conditions at sea during the shout were calm with a south-westerly Force 3 wind and half-metre sea swell.

“So far this year medical evacuations make up a high percentage of the call outs for Baltimore lifeboat,” said Kate Callanan, Baltimore RNLI volunteer lifeboat press officer.

“Acting as an ambulance between the islands off the coast of West Cork is a vital service and our volunteer crews are trained to a high standard in first aid and casualty care.

“If you find yourself at sea or on an island in need of medical assistance, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Hours later, Wicklow RNLI’s inshore lifeboat crew were alerted by pager shortly after 3.10pm yesterday afternoon (Sunday 13 May) to assist in the medic of an injured sailor in the town’s harbour.

The sailor was being treated on a yacht by first responders and HSC paramedics at the East pier after he sustained injuries while sailing in Wicklow Bay.

The lifeboat was requested to launch in case the casualty was seriously injured and needed to be evacuated from the yacht to a more suitable location for transfer to an ambulance.

The lifeboat, with helm Alan Goucher and crew Terry Sillery and Paul Sillery, was about to launch when lifeboat operations manager Des Davitt was made aware that the casualty was assisted up a ladder onto the pier after being treated by paramedics, and no further assistance was required.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#MarineWildlife - Twitter user Derek Byrne was bemused by the sight of a large seal being chased from the door of a fishmonger’s as he drove through Wicklow town on Wednesday afternoon.

But for the townsfolk, Sammy the Seal has long been something of a local celebrity — or nuisance, if you ask the staff of The Fishman on South Quay.

They might well be saying that with tongue firmly in cheek, however, given that a sign across the street says ‘seal crossing’ and that T-shirts sporting an image of the gregarious seal can be purchased nearby, as the Guardian reports.

Indeed, Afloat.ie readers may remember when Sammy last appeared here in February 2016 — after one of his regular forays from the River Vartry for fishy snacks as thwarted at the end of an umbrella.

Yet despite the local fondness for Sammy, and the seal’s growing internet notoriety, Alan Hegarty of The Fishman and the adjacent Lighthouse Restaurant warns: “At the end of the day he is a wild animal and we want him to remain that way.”

Published in Marine Wildlife
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#RNLI - Wicklow RNLI’s all-weather and inshore lifeboats launched yesterday afternoon (Sunday 1 October) after a 9m yacht with three people on board was reported to have lost its mast and rigging while racing in Wicklow Bay.

The all-weather lifeboat was alongside the dismasted yacht four minutes after launching at 3.30pm. Three lifeboat crew boarded the yacht and, as a precaution, two children were transferred from the stricken vessel onto the lifeboat.

Meanwhile, the inshore lifeboat crew were tasked with recovering the mast and sail from the sea, which were still connected by rigging to the yacht.

Once the mast and sail were recovered and secured, a tow line was established and the yacht was returned to Wicklow Harbour, where it was safely secured alongside the South Quay. Thankfully no one was injured during the incident.

Conditions at the scene had a westerly Force 3 wind with good visibility and a slight sea state.

The crew on this callout on the all-weather lifeboat were second coxswain Ciaran Doyle, mechanic Connie O'Gara, David O’Leary, Graham Fitzgerald, Vinny Mulvihill, Peter McCann, Joe Hanlon and John Stapleton. On the inshore lifeboat were helm Alan Goucher, Lisa O’Leary and Dean Mulvihill.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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#RNLI - Both Wicklow RNLI lifeboats launched yesterday afternoon (Sunday 24 September) to assist a swimmer in difficulty at Brittas Bay.

The Dublin-based Irish Coast Guard rescue helicopter, the local coastguard shore unit and an ambulance crew were also tasked to the incident at the popular tourist beach.

The first report stated the man was swimming a short distance off the beach, but further reports stated he managed to get ashore.

The inshore lifeboat crew located the man at the South end of Brittas Beach, where they administered initial casualty care and first aid until he was handed over to paramedics.

Speaking after the callout, lifeboat press officer Tommy Dover said: “Thankfully the swimmer was okay after his ordeal and required no further medical attention after being assessed by the paramedics.”

The crew on the callout with the all-weather lifeboat were second coxswain Ciaran Doyle, mechanic Tommy Murphy, Tommy McAulay, David O’Leary, Lisa O’Leary, Kevin Rahill and Terry Sillery. Crew with the inshore lifeboat were helm Dean Mulvihill, Ian Thompson and John Stapleton.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Wicklow RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat launched shortly before 6pm on Saturday evening (9 September) to assist a 13m yacht in difficulties off the Wicklow coast.

The yacht was on passage from Wales to Ireland when the forestay snapped on its mast rigging, some 23 miles off Co Wicklow.

Unable to use their sails in case the mast broke, the yacht’s crew were also low on fuel, which would prevent them from reaching Wicklow Harbour under their own power, prompting the skipper to call the Irish Coast Guard by VHF radio for assistance.

The Wicklow lifeboat Annie Blaker, under the command of coxswain Nick Keogh and with six volunteer crew, was alongside the stricken vessel at 7.20pm. Conditions at the scene were described as sea state moderate, wind Force 5, westerly in direction with good visibility.

A towline was quickly rigged to the yacht and the lifeboat crew began a three-hour tow back towards Wicklow Harbour, where the vessel and its five sailors were brought safely alongside the south quay at 10.20pm.

The crew on this callout were coxswain Nick Keogh, mechanic Brendan Copeland, Ciaran Doyle, Lisa O’Leary, Terry Sillery, Paul Sillery and John Stapleton.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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ESB’s 2040 strategy Driven to Make a Difference: Net Zero by 2040 sets out a clear roadmap for ESB to achieve net zero emissions by 2040. 

ESB will develop and connect renewable energy to decarbonise the electricity system by 2040. ESB will invest in the development of new renewable generation, including onshore and offshore wind and solar, and will significantly increase the amount of renewable generation connected to our electricity networks.

ESB will:

  • Deliver more than a fivefold increase in our renewable generation portfolio to 5,000MW.
  • Reduce carbon intensity of generation fleet from 414 to 140gCO2/kWh by 2030.
  • Decarbonise 63% of our generation output by 2030 and 100% by 2040 (up from c20% now).

Offshore wind

ESB know the importance of offshore wind in tackling climate change and delivering net zero. Ireland has a unique capability given its prime location to take advantage of the potential of offshore wind. ESB are working hard to develop offshore wind projects for the benefit of everyone across society in Ireland and the UK. This includes ongoing engagement with marine users and local communities so ESB can deliver these significant projects.

Offshore wind will play a major role globally in our fight against climate change. It will help to replace energy generated by burning fossil fuels with that from a clean, safe and secure renewable energy source. Ireland’s geographic location on the exposed edge of the Atlantic presents us with a significant opportunity to generate electricity from wind – both offshore and onshore.

Power from onshore wind farms currently provide over one-third of Ireland’s electricity needs. But, whilst its marine area is many times the size of its landmass, Ireland’s offshore wind potential is only starting to be realised. ESB have a coastline stretching over 3,000km but only one operational offshore wind farm – Arklow Bank, with a capacity of 25 MW. In contrast, Belgium’s coastline is only 63km long, but it has already developed more than 2,000 MW of offshore wind. In Great Britain, with a coastline four times the length of ours, offshore wind generation now equates to over 440 Arklow Banks, with an installed capacity of 11,0000 MW as of late 2021.

The Irish Government's target to install 5,000 MW of offshore wind capacity in our maritime area by 2030 is set out in the Climate Action Plan 2021. It also has the objective to source 80% of Ireland’s electricity needs from renewables by the same year. In line with this, ESB is applying its professional and proven engineering expertise to the challenges set within the Climate Action Plan.

ESB are committed to playing a strong role in developing Ireland’s offshore wind potential for the benefit of the people of Ireland. This will be done in consultation with marine users and local communities, and with due care for the marine environment.