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Displaying items by tag: Bundoran

Team Portugal were crowned European Surfing Champions at the final day of Eurosurf 2011 in Bundoran yesterday.
It's the first time the Portuguese have held the title since 1997, which is also when the event was last hosted in the Co Donegal seaside town.
Portugal won three of the seven different categories, with two second-place finishes, one third place and one fourth.
Their surfers fought tooth and nail in a week of competition that was dominated by France, who made a bold statement of intent on the opening day by scoring eight out of the best 15 waves - and led the pack until the closing sessions.
Meanwhile Team Ireland did not finish too badly, placing a respectable sixth in the final tally.
Ashleigh Smith made the biggest mark, narrowly beaten into second place in the women's bodyboarding division by Portugal's Catarina Sousa.
“We’ve been delighted with how the week has gone for Eurosurf," said Eurosurf press officer Shane Smyth. "If we were to draw up a blueprint for a surf competition considering waves, weather and organisation we would have nailed it."
More details of results are available on the Eurosurf website HERE.

Team Portugal were crowned European Surfing Champions at the final day of Eurosurf 2011 in Bundoran yesterday.

It's the first time the Portuguese have held the title since 1997, which is also when the event was last hosted in the Co Donegal seaside town.

Portugal won three of the seven different categories, with two second-place finishes, one third place and one fourth.

Their surfers fought tooth and nail in a week of competition that was dominated by France, who made a bold statement of intent on the opening day by scoring eight out of the best 15 waves - and led the pack until the closing sessions.

Meanwhile Team Ireland did not finish too badly, placing a respectable sixth in the final tally.

Ashleigh Smith made the biggest mark for the Irish, being narrowly beaten into second place in the women's bodyboarding division by Portugal's Catarina Sousa.

“We’ve been delighted with how the week has gone for Eurosurf," said Eurosurf press officer Shane Smyth. "If we were to draw up a blueprint for a surf competition considering waves, weather and organisation we would have nailed it."

More details of results are available on the Eurosurf website HERE.

The BBC News website also has an image gallery of the week's action HERE.

Published in Surfing
The final line-up has been confirmed for Ireland's team at the European Surfing Championships in Bundoran later this week.
Rossnowlagh's John Britton joins his cousin Easkey Britton in the strong squad aiming for Eurosurf gold.
The rest of the team includes two-time Irish national champ Shane Meehan; former Irish Open Champion Stephen Kilfeather; and multiple-time women's body board champion Ashleigh Smith.
Also in the squad are Cain Kilcullen from Enniscrone; open surfer Oliver O’Flaherty; 2008 WSCS Longboard Champion Stephen Kelleher; Irish Student Champion Ronan Oertzen; Bundoran's Shauna Ward; body boarder Darragh McCarter; and Irish team veterans John McCurry and Richie Fitzgerald.
The action kicks off in Bundoran on 23 September with the competition running till 2 October.

The final line-up has been confirmed for Ireland's team at the European Surfing Championships in Bundoran later this week.

Rossnowlagh's John Britton joins his cousin Easkey Britton in the strong squad aiming for Eurosurf gold.

The rest of the team includes two-time Irish national champ Shane Meehan; former Irish Open Champion Stephen Kilfeather; and multiple-time women's body board champion Ashleigh Smith.

Also in the squad are Cain Kilcullen from Enniscrone; open surfer Oliver O’Flaherty; 2008 WSCS Longboard Champion Stephen Kelleher; Irish Student Champion Ronan Oertzen; Bundoran's Shauna Ward; body boarder Darragh McCarter; and Irish team veterans John McCurry and Richie Fitzgerald.

The action kicks off in Bundoran on 23 September with the competition running till 2 October.

Published in Surfing
A new film telling the true story of Hawaiian surfer Bethany Hamilton will have its gala Irish screening following the opening ceremony of Eurosurf 2011 in Bundoran on Saturday 24 September.
Soul Surfer stars AnnaSophia Robb as Hamilton, who lost her arm in a shark attack yet battled against all odds to become a champion again.
The film features an all-star cast including Helen Hunt, Dennis Quaid and American Idol winner Carrie Underwood in her film debut.
The story also has a special connection to Bundoran, as Bethany Hamilton is descended from a well-known family in the area. Bethany even visited the town some years ago to find out more about her heritage.
"We are thrilled to have the gala Irish screening of Soul Surfer as part of the opening festivities for Eurosurf," said press officer Shane Smyth. "Such an inspirational film is bound to inject even more enthusiasm for the competitors taking part in the European Surfing Championships as the contest prepares to kick off.
"Having already seen the film, I can say that viewers are in for a treat – some stunning photography and some awesome surfing.”
The European Surfing Championships take place in Bundoran from 24 September to 2 October.

A new film telling the true story of Hawaiian surfer Bethany Hamilton will have its gala Irish screening following the opening ceremony of Eurosurf 2011 in Bundoran on Saturday 24 September. 

Soul Surfer stars AnnaSophia Robb as Hamilton, who lost her arm in a shark attack yet battled against all odds to become a champion again.

The film features an all-star cast including Helen Hunt, Dennis Quaid and American Idol winner Carrie Underwood in her film debut. 

The story also has a special connection to Bundoran, as Bethany Hamilton is descended from a well-known family in the area. Bethany even visited the town some years ago to find out more about her heritage.

"We are thrilled to have the gala Irish screening of Soul Surfer as part of the opening festivities for Eurosurf," said press officer Shane Smyth. "Such an inspirational film is bound to inject even more enthusiasm for the competitors taking part in the European Surfing Championships as the contest prepares to kick off. 

"Having already seen the film, I can say that viewers are in for a treat – some stunning photography and some awesome surfing.”

The European Surfing Championships take place in Bundoran from 24 September to 2 October.

Published in Surfing
The Financial Times has highlighted Ireland as one of the world's top emerging surfing destinations.
"The quality of Irish surf has been recognised for many years, writes adventure journalist Alf Alderson, "but it’s only recently that it has really taken off as a top destination for everyone from beginner to big wave expert."
Bundoran in Co Sligo gets the biggest props among the west coast's surfing hotspots, boasting a range of surf for everyone from beginners to expert waveriders.
But Ireland's largest waves at Mullaghmore Point also get their due - with its 50 foot swells putting it in league with the best in the world.
The Financial Times has more on the story HERE.

The Financial Times has highlighted Ireland as one of the world's top emerging surfing destinations.

"The quality of Irish surf has been recognised for many years, writes adventure journalist Alf Alderson, "but it’s only recently that it has really taken off as a top destination for everyone from beginner to big wave expert."

Bundoran in Co Sligo gets the biggest props among the west coast's surfing hotspots, boasting a range of surf for everyone from beginners to expert waveriders.

But Ireland's largest waves at Mullaghmore Point also get their due - with its 50 foot swells putting it in league with the best in the world. 

The Financial Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing
Stephen Kilfeather retained his Irish Open Surfing Championship title at last weekend's County Sligo Open.
The 24-year-old Sligo native squeaked past fellow Team Ireland members Cain Kilcullen and Ronan Oertzen to clinch the title for the second year in a row at the final event of the 2011 Irish surfing tour.
“I’m stoked to win it again," said Kilfeather, who also came first at the weekend. "Back to back for two years running is a great achievement.”
He said the competition was “a great warm-up for the European Surfing Championships in Bundoran" next month.
Team Ireland members did well in the overall rankings in Sligo, with John Britton taking the senior title, Ashleigh Smith the women’s body board title, Shane Meehan the Bodyboard title, Easkey Britton the women’s title and John McCurry regaining the longboard title. Team Ireland manager Stevie Burns was also successful, winning the Masters title.

Stephen Kilfeather retained his Irish Open Surfing Championship title at last weekend's County Sligo Open.

The 24-year-old Sligo native squeaked past fellow Team Ireland members Cain Kilcullen and Ronan Oertzen to clinch the title for the second year in a row at the final event of the 2011 Irish surfing tour.

“I’m stoked to win it again," said Kilfeather, who also came first at the weekend. "Back to back for two years running is a great achievement.” 

He said the competition was “a great warm-up for the European Surfing Championships in Bundoran" next month. 

Team Ireland members did well in the overall rankings in Sligo, with John Britton taking the senior title, Ashleigh Smith the women’s body board title, Shane Meehan the Bodyboard title, Easkey Britton the women’s title and John McCurry regaining the longboard title. Team Ireland manager Stevie Burns was also successful, winning the Masters title.

Published in Surfing
A female swimmer was rescued from the sea at Bundoran, Co. Donegal by Bundoran RNLI lifeboat yesterday afternoon. The alarm was raised by a member of the public before 4.00pm. The swimmer was aided by another person in the water off the main beach in Bundoran and then she was brought ashore safely by the RNLI crew.

Commenting after the call out, lifeboat press officer Colm Hamrogue said, "We are delighted that the young swimmer is home safe and sound. We also want to thank the member of the public for calling out the lifeboat. We advise everybody to take care when enjoying the water over the coming summer months. It is important to follow safety advice when taking to the water. 

Irish lifeboat rescue news here

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Tagged under
This Saturday (4 September 2010) Bundoran RNLI lifeboat crew will literally be pushing the boat out to raise funds for the life saving charity.  They will be holding a boat push from Ballyshannon to Bundoran in Donegal and want people to turn out and cheer them on during their 9.5km push.

The boat push will start on Donegal Road in Ballyshannon at noon and members of the lifeboat crew will have buckets with them on the route for people to make a donation.

The fundraising drive comes as Bundoran RNLI recently received a new state of the art Atlantic 85 lifeboat.  The new lifeboat can carry a fourth crewmember and has more room for casualties.  It can also reach speeds of up to 35 knots in responding to an emergency.

Commenting on the fundraiser, lifeboat press officer Colm Hamrogue said, "The lifeboat crew wanted to do something a bit different to raise funds for the station.  Many people have done a bed push but not too many people have done a boat push, which makes sense for a lifeboat station.  Our volunteer crew count on the generous support of the public to ensure that the RNLI can continue to provide all year search and rescue coverage and we hope to get lots of support on Saturday."

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Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Bundoran RNLI lifeboat was called out twice yesterday (Tuesday, 27 July) to two individual callouts in Bundoran, Co. Donegal. The first call out was to three children off the main beach in Bundoran. Two of the children had been taken to shore by local beach lifeguards and the lifeboat brought the third child to shore safety. The three children received first aid and oxygen and then were taken to Sligo General Hospital by ambulance. They were three children from the one family on holiday in Bundoran from Co. Down.

The second callout was to two adults in their mid twenties who were walking on the famous “Rougey Walk” and stepped off the walk, on to the rocks at the Fairy Bridges and with the large swell in the waves, the two persons got into difficulties with their dog. The lifeboat crew assisted the two persons to get back to safe ground on the shore.

Commenting after the callouts, Colm Hamrogue, Press Officer, Bundoran RNLI Lifeboat said, “Thankfully everyone was rescued safely today. It is very important to be fully aware of your surrounding when enjoying sea for the rest of the summer. When you are on the shore and you see something you are not sure of, please do not hesitating in calling the RNLI Lifeboat on 112. It is better to be safe than sorry as we want everyone to have a safe and happy summer.

Related Safety posts

RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Safety News


Rescue News from RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Coast Guard News from Ireland


Water Safety News from Ireland

Marine Casualty Investigation Board News

Marine Warnings

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Page 9 of 9

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

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