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Displaying items by tag: Cork Harbour

We’ve become sadly inured to reports of Denis Doyle’s exquisitely-varnished Crosshaven-built Frers 51 Moonduster of 1981-vintage mouldering mossily in the harsh climate of northern Norway. So when a certain nautically-minded antiquarian bookseller of the Roughty Valley in southwest Kerry mentioned he’d heard from Scandinavia of the super-star of 1974, the Ron Holland One Tonner Golden Apple built in Cork with Bushe family brilliance for Hugh Coveney, we prepared ourselves for bad news.

Not so. After going through a couple of post-Coveney ownerships in the south of England, many years ago Golden Apple went to Denmark. There, she has been much loved and kept in extremely good order thanks to wintering in one of those classy Baltic boat-sheds where the heating comes on if freezing temperatures threaten.

Were it not for the fact that we know so well when she was built, you’d think she was ten years old at most. But this is indeed the boat in which Harold Cudmore properly launched his stellar international sailing career, and he and she made such an impact in the Worlds at Torquay that everyone now tends to remember Golden Apple even though another boat was the actual winner, with Cudmore’s first Ton Class Worlds title coming two years later in 1976 with the Half Tonner Silver Apple - now owned by Conor Fogerty of Howth.

Golden Apple meanwhile - the pioneer of them all - is now a very manageable classic, and for sale at €60,400 – details and more photos here 

Published in Boat Sales
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One year on since completion, the Haulbowline Island Recreational Amenity in the heart of Cork Harbour is the largest project of its kind to date in Ireland.

The Haulbowline Remediation by Cork County Council has transformed the former East Tip site into a 22-acre People’s Park in the middle of the Harbour.

And, as we celebrate the first anniversary of the park, Afloat's 'before' aerial photos below show what an amazing transformation has been carried out by Cork County Council. 

650,000 cubic metres of by-products from steel production were deposited here over a 40-year period650,000 cubic metres of by-products from steel production were deposited here over a 40-year period Photos: Bob Bateman

Haulbowline, home to the headquarters of the Irish Naval Service, was also formerly the location of Ireland’s only steelworks from 1939 until its closure in 2001. 650,000 cubic metres of by-products from the steel production was deposited here over a 40-year period.

The extensive remediation of the site saw the delivery onto the island of over 15,000 HGV loads of material, 47,000 tonnes of rock armour material to protect the shoreline, 180,000 tonnes of subsoil and 37,000 tonnes of topsoil, transforming the site into the scenic landscaped recreational amenity it is today.

As Afloat previously reported, complete with 4kms of fully accessible pathways, a 1 km jogging circuit, playing pitches and seating areas that lend themselves to remarkable views of the harbour and wildlife observation, the island has hundreds of native tree mixes and plants to promote biodiversity.

Published in Cork Harbour

Saturday, January 15th, was day two of Monkstown Bay Sailing Club’s Laser Winter League in Cork Harbour.

A windless morning was in store for the competitors. The bay was calm and clear, and the air had a cold bite. Nonetheless, the ever-popular league had attracted a fleet of sixteen sailors who swarmed the sand quay in the early hours of Saturday morning.

The club hut was surrounded by hustling volunteers who prepared the equipment for the intense racing that was to unfold at Ten O'Clock. With the windward/leeward course set, crash boats launched and sailors dressed, racing could begin.

The first few lasers drifted their way out on a glassy bay. The view of white dinghies on a calm bay was lovely yet unpromising. Alas, the optimism of Race Officer Alan Fehily and his team could not be quenched, and the starting gun went on time.

MBSC Committee Boat and Race Officer Alan FehilyMBSC Committee Boat and Race Officer Alan Fehily

The pin was crowded and it was a battlefield of lasers fighting their way off the start line for race one. The breeze picked up at a slow pace and the competitors sailed their boats with finesse around the course.

Taking an early lead was MBSC’s Ronan Kenneally who took on the shifty conditions at a rapid pace. Only a metre behind was Richie Harrington. The two pushed each other around the course for the duration of the race. Taking first place was Kenneally, closely followed by Harrington across the finish line.

Slightly more breeze filled the course for race two and an increased tidal flow made race tactics difficult. Battling it out for line honours were MBSC sailors Richie Harrington, Chris Bateman and Rob Howe. With an exciting tacking battle towards the finish line, Harrington took first place. Following in second was Bateman. Rob Howe finished in third, nearly overtaking first and second place boats while they battled it out.

Race three was the most difficult of them all. Tidelines and tricky wind conditions gave the competitors a traditional South Westerly Monkstown bay racecourse.

Excelling on all fronts was MBSC’S Paul O’Sullivan, who took an early lead. Untouchable for the duration of the race, he extended away from the fleet, finishing with a big lead. Ronan Kenneally followed in second place with the consistent Rob Howe finishing in third place.

Once again, the sailors were ashore before twelve noon. After putting the boats away, they converged in the Bosun to warm up chilly hands. It was another great morning’s racing on Monkstown Bay thanks to the fine race organisers and competitive sailors.

Published in Laser

Local Laser sailor Chris Bateman emerged as the winner of today's three races of the Monkstown Bay Sailing Club's Yard of Ale Trophy in Cork Harbour. 

The 14-boat fleet braved strong gales for today's series, the first dinghy racing of the new year.

Second overall was Ronan Kenneally with third place going to Sunday's Well Sailing Club's Paul O'Sullivan. 

Monkstown Bay Sailing Frostbites ResultsMonkstown Bay Sailing Frostbites Results 2022

Published in Cork Harbour

On December 26th, Monkstown Bay Sailing Club's (MBSC) annual Christmas event was held on the tranquil waters of Cork Harbour.

On the early Sunday morning, sailors in competitive spirit showed up on time to make the early start of ten o'clock.

The bay gleamed in the winter sunshine as people began to arrive at the Sand Quay. Although the sunrise was a pretty sight, it revealed the harbour to be as still as a pond.

Alex Barry and Fred Cudmore were second in a Pink RS400 Photo: Bob BatemanAlex Barry and Fred Cudmore were second in a pink RS400 Photo: Bob Bateman

Disregarding the light breeze, twelve boats lined up on the start line. Those boats were made up of a mixed fleet; Three 5o5's, an RS400, and the rest of the pack were made up of standard rigged Lasers.

Slight puffs of breeze began to show on the water just in time as the gun went off. This light wind theme continued for all three races.

Tight racing on the bay (Laser to windward is George Kingston, Laser in between Chris Bateman, blue 505 is Anthony Coole and Chris Granby)Tight racing on the bay (Laser to windward is George Kingston, Laser in between Chris Bateman, blue 505 is Anthony Coole and Chris Granby) Photo: Bob Bateman

A very competitive fleet battled it out for their positions. John Downey and Sandy Rimmington's 5o5 dominated throughout the races, showing a turn of speed that put many Laser sailors in their place.

Laser sailor George Kingston (AUS210150) comes off the start lineLaser sailor George Kingston (AUS210150) comes off the start line

The results were set after gently steering their boats around the courses all morning. Winning the Magner Cup was John/Sandy in their 5o5. The RS400 sailed by Alex Barry/Fred Cudmore followed up in second. In third place was Harry Pritchard sailing his Laser.

Brian Jones and Gary Frost in their 5o5Brian Jones and Gary Frost in their 5o5 Photo: Bob Bateman

The racing was tight, on time, and the competition was intense. This is typical of Monkstown Bay and its club. Alan Fehily and his team did very well to finish the three races on time. Alan has never failed to get us in on time, and as promised, everyone was ashore by twelve o'clock.

Ronan Kenneally in a Laser (192703) tacks on to starboardRonan Kenneally in Laser 192703 Photo: Bob Bateman

While the morning was a great success, it is only the start of Monkstown Bay Sailing Club's season. Coming up in two weeks is the beginning of the Laser Winter League, where Laser sailors from Cork and beyond will be treated to the best dinghy racing in Cork Harbour.

5o5 duo Sandy Rimmington (left) and John Downey5o5 duo Sandy Rimmington (left) and John Downey Photo: Bob Bateman

Monkstown Bay Sailing Club's St. Stephen's Day Race 2021 Photo Gallery by Bob Bateman

Published in Cork Harbour

St Stephen’s Day saw the inaugural launch of traditional Currach craft on the Owenabue River at Carrigaline in Cork Harbour.

Members of Naomhoga Corcaigh rowed from Wesley across to the Otter which is atop the plinth in the centre of the town opposite the Gaelic Bar.

It is hoped to make this an annual St Stephen's Day Event and ties in with wider community plans to turn Carrigaline into a beacon for watersports enthusiasts

Government funding is to be sought to drive the project to fruition.

An initial plan drawn up by municipal district council officials, with the help of a blueway expert, was presented to councillors last May which looked at the possible landing and launching sites for the project along the Owenabue river and estuary.

The plan focused on locations such as Carrigaline Community Park, the two bridges close to it, the town's former abattoir site as well as the Drakes Pool/Rabbit Island area.

Naomhoga Corcaigh members in Carrigaline for the inaugural Currach launch Photo: Brendan Nash

Fine Gael councillor Liam O'Connor, who was the first person to suggest the idea of developing facilities in Carrigaline, welcomed the initial report.

He maintained the ideal site to create permanent facilities for the project, such as toilets, changing rooms etc, was in the Drakes Pool/Rabbit Island area. However, he added that additional parking space would have to be created there to facilitate it.

“It's great that the council has expressed an appetite for this. We should look for this (government) funding for a feasibility study to kick-start this project,” Mr O'Connor told the Irish Examiner in May.

Naomhoga Corcaigh's ethos is to provide access to the River Lee and to encourage the sport of traditional Irish rowing with a bit of craic and beagáinín Gaeilge (a little of the Irish language)!​

Published in Cork Harbour
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Monkstown Bay Sailing Club (MBSC) will hold the only race in Cork Harbour over the Christmas period.

This is the annual St.Stephen’s Day event, also a fundraiser for the RNLI.

An early start is planned, with First Gun at 10 a.m., which will require quite a bit of commitment from those planning to sail after Christmas Day celebrations!

“It’s an open event, with a €10 entry fee and all are welcome,” MBSC says.

Published in Cork Harbour

Kinsale yachtsman Alan Mulcahy's recently arrived First Class 8 'Black Magic' yacht has been lost after a fire on board the boat at the weekend. 

The yacht went up in flames and sank off Ringabella, just outside Cork Harbour on Monday afternoon during a scheduled delivery trip back to Mulcahy's home port of Kinsale Harbour in West Cork.

The dramatic scene was witnessed by nearby boats and people on the shoreline.

The smoke plume clearly visible from the shore The smoke plume clearly visible from the shore. See videos below

The yacht had competed in October's recent AIB Royal Cork Yacht Club Autumn Series and this month's O'Leary Insurances Winter League and was due to be lifted out and stored ashore for the winter at Kinsale Boatyard.

Black Magic on fire. Photo: courtesy Cian O'ConnorBlack Magic on fire following a problem with the outboard engine. Photo: courtesy Cian O'Connor

Mulcahy, the only person onboard the boat at the time of the incident, told Afloat that he was approximately an hour into his trip when he heard a bang and saw the vessel's outboard engine on fire.

Mulcahy, who is a very experienced sailor with over 30 years experience and Yachtmaster certification, put out a mayday call via his VHF radio that was answered by a nearby trawler who relayed the message to the Coastguard.

Mulcahy said he made his way to the bow of the boat as flames engulfed the cockpit area.

Fortunately, a nearby 20-foot opening fishing boat, the Annabella, skippered by Mick Hoey and crewed by Cian O'Connor, saw the flames and rescued Mulcahy from the burning fibreglass vessel.

Alan  Mulcahy's recently arrived First Class 8 'Black Magic' that went on fire and sank off the Cork coast Photo: Bob BatemanAlan Mulcahy's recently arrived First Class 8 'Black Magic' that went on fire and sank off the Cork coast Photo: Bob Bateman

Mulcahy said that the yacht sank shortly afterwards. He was then transferred from the Annabella and taken ashore to Crosshaven by a Port of Cork RIB skipped by Kieran Coniry.

Mulcahy expressed his deep gratitude to all involved in the rescue including the Coastguard, the fishermen on board Annabella, the Port of Cork RIB crew and Gary Heslin of the Crosshaven RNLI and the staff and doctors who then assessed him for smoke and fire inhalation.

It is the second incident to befall racing yachts at Cork Harbour this winter, with a J109 ending up on the rocks in the last race of the Royal Cork league as Afloat reported here

• Fisherman Mick Hoey spoke to Joe Duffy on RTE Radio One about how he and crewman Cian saved Yachtsman Alan Mulcahy here

Published in Cork Harbour

Fiona Young's Albin Express North Star leads the IRC White Sails Division of Royal Cork Yacht Club's O'Leary Insurance Winter League 2021 after five races sailed in Cork Harbour.

The Myrtleville helmswoman has a two-point margin after today's race in an ideal northwest sailing breeze at the bottom of a December spring tide.

One time leader, Diamond (Colman Garvey / Kieran Kelleher), is second on nine points from Richard Leonard's Bolero Bandit on 13 points.

Fiona Young's Albin Express North StarFiona Young's Albin Express North Star Photo: Bob Bateman

After a running start from Cage out the harbour to No. 3 buoy the course set by Race Officer Clem McElligott took the fleet on a beat back to Cage and then a harbour course to the finish.

The Tingle family's new X-4 AlpacaFront runner - The Tingle family's new X-4 Alpaca Photo: Bob Bateman

The Tingle family's new X-4 Alpaca led on the water but in their wake were some real boat to boat battles real between Anthony O'Leary's modified 1720 and Nick Walsh's new 1720 entry Breaking Bad. Likewise, there was a good tussle between the overall leader North Star and the quarter tonner Diamond.

Results are here

Day Five O'Leary Insurances Winter League Photo Gallery By Bob Bateman

Published in Royal Cork YC

ICRA Champion 2021 yacht Kaya is heading to Cork Harbour subject to survey, that's according to unconfirmed reports from Crosshaven.

This month's advertisement for the Greystones Harbour yacht (for sale at €145k through Key Yachting) drew an immediate response from interested south coast parties currently looking to upgrade.

As regular Afloat readers will know, the J/122 that took overall honours in her debut Irish season at the ICRAs at Dun Laoghaire and Calves Week in West Cork first sailed in Irish waters in May during ISORA's training races.

Set up for both inshore and offshore racing, the good news is the ready to race boat looks to be staying in the Irish cruiser-racer fleet and not going abroad so it's entirely feasible she could yet be on the June start line for the 2022 Round Ireland Race and July's Cork Week.

Published in Cork Harbour
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Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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