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The Sea Fisheries Protection Authority (SFPA) says that a Spanish-registered fishing vessel was "operating within the waters of Bantry Bay and therefore within Ireland's 12-nautical mile limit" during what Irish fishermen in the South West claim was an attempted ramming incident.

The incident was filmed by the crew of the Irish trawler.

The Irish skipper can be heard on VHF radio telling the Spanish boat to 'stay away from us.'

The CEO of the Irish South and West Fish Producers, Patrick Murphy, called SFPA Chair Susan Steele and asked for immediate action.

Fishermen also called for the Navy to protect Irish fishing boats.

The CEO of the Irish South and West Fish Producers, Patrick MurphyThe CEO of the Irish South and West Fish Producers, Patrick Murphy

"The Sea-Fisheries Protection Authority are aware of a situation that arose when a Spanish registered vessel was encountered by an Irish-registered vessel operating within the waters of Bantry Bay and therefore within the IRL 12-nautical mile limit. The situation continues to be closely monitored by the National Fisheries Monitoring Centre at the Naval Base, Haulbowline," the SFPA said in a statement.

The incident happened on Friday morning, two days after fishermen staged a demonstration in Cork protesting at the dominant quotas held by non-Irish EU vessels in Irish waters.

"This was an attempt to force Irish boats off our own fishing grounds. It is intimidation. Our authorities must take action against this vessel acting extremely dangerously at sea and endangering life," the Chief Executive of the Irish South and West Fish Producers' Organisation, Patrick Murphy, said. "It is appalling. This was a threat to life at sea, so action must be taken against the vessel which tried to do the ramming. The Spanish boat should be arrested and stopped from fishing in Irish waters."

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The Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine Charlie McConalogue T.D., said that Norway unilaterally announced this morning that it would give itself a 55% increase in its share of the Mackerel Stock in 2021. In tonnage terms, this means an increase from 191,843 tonnes to 298,299 tonnes – an increase of 106,456 tonnes for 2021. The Norwegian decision seeks to increase its share of the Mackerel Stock from 22.5% to 35%.

Mackerel has been managed under a UN Coastal States Agreement that involved the EU, Norway and the Faroe Islands for the period 2014 to 2020. Iceland had refused to participate in the management agreement and the three parties set aside a share of the stock for it. In 2021, after Brexit and the UK departure from the EU, the new parties involved have not been able to put a new Coastal States Agreement on Mackerel in place.

Minister McConalogue said, “This declaration by Norway to hugely increase its fishery for mackerel is a direct threat to the sustainability of the mackerel fishery and the future of the Irish pelagic fishing industry. There is no justification for this unilateral, opportunistic and unsustainable move. This is all the more disappointing because it undermines the critically important arrangements for joint management of mackerel by the Coastal States under the UN structure. As the scientific advice sets the sustainable level of fishing each year on mackerel, an increase by Norway means either the stock is overfished or other parties must take a smaller share. Neither option is acceptable.”

The mackerel stock is a widely distributed, migratory fish that inhabits much of the north-eastern Atlantic shelf ranging from south of Ireland and the Bay of Biscay to north of Norway. It is fast swimming forming dense shoals when migrating from its spawning grounds to the south and west of Ireland and migrate to northern waters to feedThe mackerel stock is a widely distributed, migratory fish that inhabits much of the north-eastern Atlantic shelf ranging from south of Ireland and the Bay of Biscay to north of Norway. It is fast swimming forming dense shoals when migrating from its spawning grounds to the south and west of Ireland and migrate to northern waters to feed

Under the EU /UK Trade and Co-operation Agreement, there was a 26% reduction in our mackerel quota within the EU by 2026, with 60% of this reduction applied in 2021. Mackerel remains Irelands most important fishery with a quota for 2021 of 60,849 tonnes valued at approximately €80m and it underpins the important Irish pelagic fish processing industry in the North West. Ireland is the largest Mackerel quota holder in the EU.

Minister Mc McConalogue made clear that; “I am calling on EU Commissioner Sinkevičius to reject completely this unilateral action by Norway to claim a much higher share of the mackerel stock. I am writing to him immediately to ask him to respond without delay to this provocative and irresponsible action. I will ask him to outline what actions the European Commission will take to protect the important EU mackerel fleets and mackerel processing industry. It is vital that the EU Commissioner takes urgent steps to counteract this irresponsible action by Norway. Norway must understand that responsible partners do not get rewarded for such unacceptable action.”

Minister Mc McConalogue added, “Our mackerel fishermen have already taken unacceptable cuts to their share of the mackerel stock under the EU/UK TCA. I am working with them to pursue all avenues to deliver a more equitable burden sharing within the EU. I am very concerned that this action by Norway will add further uncertainty to the mackerel industry already trying to adjust to reduce quotas after Brexit.”

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A flotilla of 73 Irish fishing vessels participated in a mass demonstration yesterday which may be the first in a series of protests, according to industry leaders.

The “Show and Tell” event organised by the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation (IS&WFPO) delivered a letter to the constituency office of Taoiseach Micheal Martin in Cork, seeking direct talks with him.

Vessels from Clogherhead, Co Louth right round to Rossaveal, Co Galway, and including all southern ports, participated – leaving berths up to 24 hours beforehand in some cases to make it to Cork harbour.

“This is the first stage in a campaign, where we want to show the Irish people what is actually happening to our industry,” IS&WFPO chief executive Patrick Murphy said.

80 per cent of the beamer fleet from south coast Irish ports also took part, Murphy noted.

80 per cent of the beamer fleet from south coast Irish ports took part in the Cork Harbour campaign Photo: Bob Bateman80 per cent of the beamer fleet from south coast Irish ports took part in the Cork Harbour campaign Photo: Bob Bateman

The loss of 15 per cent overall of Irish fish quota in the Brexit deal and the reintroduction of an administrative penalty points system were key issues that the event aimed to highlight.

The protest also aimed to emphasise the impact of the recent withdrawal of the EU control plan - which means all fish catches have to be weighed on piers.

The Irish Fish Processors and Exporters Association has called on Irish Marine minister Charlie McConalogue to demand evidence from the EU for what it has described as a “blunt, crude” decision by the EU Commission.

“What makes this unbearable is that all this is happening during a global pandemic, where the Irish fishing fleet was designated an essential service for the continuity of food supply,” Murphy said.

The fleet assembled at Roche’s Point off Cork harbour early on Wednesday and steamed up to Cork Port.

“Fishing crews, mechanics, engineers, oil companies, net manufacturers, shops, supermarkets all supported us –it was a real community event,” Murphy said.

Murphy paid tribute to the Garda, Naval Service and Port of Cork for accommodating the peaceful protest, and to members of the public for supporting it.

“Fishermen are putting themselves before the public, to show them the boats they have, the huge investment, creating jobs, the families with long traditions who face being forced out of fishing,” he said.

“Many businesses throughout the country, through no fault of their own, will not survive the current climate financially,” the IS&WFPO has warned.

“ The countless job losses, financial worries these people have of maintaining mortgage payments and putting food on their tables is unimaginable,” it says.

A photo gallery of the trawler protest at Roches Point is here

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Fishing vessels are steaming up the river Lee to Cork city this morning in protest over serious issues affecting the Irish industry.

A beautiful morning in Cork Harbour has allowed the fleet to assemble at Roches Point in perfectly flat sea conditions.

See photo gallery below

The “Show and Tell” campaign, spearheaded by the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation (IS&WFPO), aims to deliver a letter to Taoiseach Micheál Martin’s constituency office in Turner’s Cross, Cork.

The IS&WFPO says it has the co-operation with the Port of Cork Company and the Garda for the event and is inviting the public to “come and view these vessels, meet the men and women who work these vessels, hear their stories and talk with our representatives”.

The protest fleet assembled off Roches Point, Cork Harbour at 7 am on Wednesday, and a public address will be held at Horgan’s Quay, Cork at 12 noon, before the walk to Turner’s Cross.

 
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Fishermen from the South West Coast will head for Cork Port on Wednesday to "show and tell the crazy scenario" facing their industry.

"We are not being treated fairly by either the EU or the government who are not protecting the natural resource of Ireland to which Irish people should have the major rights," according to their Chief Executive Patrick Murphy.

"Fishermen don't want to be in this situation. It is not what they want to be doing, but they are left with no choice; things are so bad. The fishing industry is a vital part of our coastal economy and we need community support for it," says the CEO.

The planned flotilla will assemble at 7 a.m. on Wednesday at Roche's Point and sail up the River Lee to the city quays.

The 'show and tell event' is being coordinated with the Port of Cork and An Garda Síochána to minimise any disruption to harbour traffic and commercial business.

Listen to Tom MacSweeney's podcast with Fishing Chief Patrick Murphy below and read Afloat's report by Lorna Siggins on the protest here

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Fishing vessels are due to steam up the river Lee to Cork city on Wednesday in protest over serious issues affecting the Irish industry.

The “Show and Tell” campaign, spearheaded by the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation (IS&WFPO), aims to deliver a letter to Taoiseach Micheál Martin’s constituency office in Turner’s Cross, Cork.

The IS&WFPO says it has the co-operation with the Port of Cork Company and the Garda for the event, and is inviting the public to “come and view these vessels, meet the men and women who work these vessels, hear their stories and talk with our representatives”.

The protest fleet will assemble off Roches Point, Cork Harbour at 7 am on Wednesday, and a public address will be held at Horgan’s Quay, Cork at 12 noon, before the walk to Turner’s Cross.

The impact of the loss of 15 per cent overall of quota in the Brexit deal, the reintroduction of an administrative penalty points system, and the recent withdrawal of the EU control plan which means all fish catches have to be weighed on piers are issues which the protest aims to highlight.

The IS&WFPO says that “what makes this unbearable is that this is happening during a global pandemic, where the Irish fishing fleet was designated an essential service for the continuity of food supply”.

“Fishermen were asked to put aside their fears of being hundreds of miles away from medical help if it were needed for the benefit of our people,” it says.

Patrick Murphy, Chief Executive of the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ OrganisationPatrick Murphy, Chief Executive of the Irish South and West Fish Producers’ Organisation

“ One would think that our government should thank us like all others on the front line and recognise our vulnerability as an industry and the importance of maintaining the national fleet,”it says.

“Many businesses throughout the country, through no fault of their own, will not survive the current climate financially,” the IS&WFPO says.

“ The countless job losses, financial worries these people have of maintaining mortgage payments and putting food on their tables is unimaginable,” it says.

“ The vast majority of our members share these worries, but not because they cannot trade or continue the profession that was passed down to them from their fathers and mothers- but because their rights have been stripped away and they now find themselves the pawn on the chessboard of Europe to be sacrificed so larger countries may triumph,” it states.

Minister for Marine Charlie McConalogueMinister for Marine Charlie McConalogue

The organisation welcomes the recent setting up of a ministerial taskforce by Minister for Marine Charlie McConalogue as “some recognition by Government that our industry is on the verge of collapse”.

Listen to Tom MacSweeney's podcast with IS&WFPO Chief Patrick Murphy here

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The Government has been urged not to delay in establishing a formal liaison between marine users including fishermen and the offshore renewable energy industry.

As The Times Ireland edition reports today, the Department of Housing – currently lead agency for marine planning - says it is “acutely aware” of communication issues between the fishing industry and offshore renewable energy.

Draft terms of reference for forming a seafood/offshore renewable energy “working group” are still being worked on, it says.

The National Inshore Fishermen's Association (NIFA) says that liaison and State guidelines should not be “long-fingered” if confrontations are to be avoided.

NIFA has said difficulties have already arisen in the Irish Sea, where one wind energy company “reneged” on its commitment to fishermen.

As a result, several NIFA members had to engage expensive legal advice, NIFA secretary Alex Crowley said.

NIFA is calling for establishment by the State of guidelines for wind energy companies dealing with other stakeholders including the fishing sector.

Sligo fishermen David Downes, who fishes out of Raghley on the east side of Sligo Bay, says that there has been no direct contact by an energy company in relation to its recent application to conduct an offshore wind energy feasibility study off the Sligo, Leitrim and Donegal coast.

Aniar Offshore Array confirmed that it has submitted an investigatory foreshore licence which, if granted, would allow it five years to conduct investigations and assessments of feasible sites for both fixed and offshore wind.

“If the licensing authority decides to grant this application, Aniar Offshore Array will publish all application documents to the website and update all stakeholders of the development,” a company spokeswoman said.

The company confirmed the total area to be surveyed is 1,162.26 km2 off Sligo, Leitrim and South Donegal.

It said it was considering a two-phase project - a first phase involving a static or fixed turbine development of approximately 500 MW situated within 10 to 22 km off the coast, covering an area of approximately 125km2.

The second phase would involve another 500 MW approximately of floating turbines, within 14 to 33 km off the coast and comprising an area of approximately 180km2, the company said.

Downes said this was a substantial sea area and, “even at this stage” consultation with all stakeholders was important, and not just with representative organisations.

The Government is committed to increasing the current target of offshore wind energy from 3.5 gigawatts (GW) to five GW off the Irish east and south coasts by 2030.

It has prioritised the Maritime Area Planning (MAP) Bill – formerly titled the Marine Planning and Development Management Bill – which will issue marine area consents for offshore wind projects.

Minister for Environment and Climate Eamon Ryan has said the legislation would provide for a “ steady predictable phased routine process” of licensing and approving offshore wind.

Read The Times Ireland here

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An environmental group has called on Taoiseach Micheál Martin to separate the State’s Sea Fisheries Protection Agency from control by the Department of Agriculture and the Marine.

As The Times Ireland edition reports today, the Friends of the Irish Environment (FIE) believe EU penalties imposed on the Irish fishing sector are a consequence of the SFPA's lack of independence.

The entire Irish fishing sector is now having to bear the burden of penalties arising from an EU audit of specific breaches which were not sufficiently addressed by Irish authorities, FIE says.

The 2018 EU audit had identified “severe and significant weaknesses in the Irish control system” for the EU’s Common Fisheries Policy, detailing irregularities, including the manipulation of weighing systems in some instances.

Ireland is already negotiating terms of a payback quotas, as the EU auditors found that Ireland had overfished its quota of mackerel by 28,600 tonnes; horse mackerel quota by 8,100 tonnes and blue whiting by 5,600 tonnes between 2012 and 2016.

The EU’s recent decision to withdraw Ireland’s control plan for weighing catches has caused consternation within the industry, as all seafood catches by both large and small vessels now have to be weighed at the point of landing.

Ireland had previously secured a derogation to allow weighing in factories, due to the loss of quality involved in weighing at the pier.

The FIE has published the full EU audit report on its website, and has also written to the National Bureau of Criminal Investigations and to the Criminal Assets Bureau, asking both agencies if they are aware of the audit team’s recommendations in relation to tackling fraud.

SFPA chair Dr Susan Steele,who is due to take up a post as head of the EU’s fisheries control agency in Vigo, Spain in September, said the EU decision on weighing catches at the point of landing is a “clear marker of tougher fisheries controls across the EU”.

However, the Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation (KFO) has said it is “simply flabbergasted” that what it described as “this bewildering move which has such a direct and draconian impact on all aspects of Irish fisheries” could “be considered without any advance notice”.

In its letter to the Taoiseach, the FIE says that that the root cause of the problem is an undermining of the independence of the SFPA by the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine.

Noting the department's “ development priorities”, FIE Director Tony Lowes said the “necessary and appropriate checks and balances incumbent on the department in the exercise of its functions are impossible”.

“The compounding procedures brought against Ireland by the EU are because the SFPA, like the Marine Institute, is administered by the part of the Department of Agriculture also responsible for the promotion of the seafood industry,” he said.

He has urged the Taoiseach to transfer administration and financing of the SFPA to “one of the many non-marine divisions”.

The Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine said it was "not accurate" to suggest it undermined the SFPA's independence.

It said the SFPA's independence is laid down in legislation that is "fully respected", and it said it had also increased the SFPA's budget with further recruitment planned for this year.

Read The Times here

Published in Fishing

Dun Laoghaire Harbour’s strategic location as an EU port in the middle of the Irish Sea may have been overlooked by commercial fishing fleets for years but since Brexit, it appears Belgian fishermen have been quick to see the advantage of the Dublin Bay port.

Not only did two Belgian trawlers take shelter from today’s forecasted south-easterly gale but both 38-metre boats also offloaded catch at the harbour’s number two-berth on the Carlisle Pier.

It brings to four the number of big Belgian vessels using the port this month, more than doubling the sporadic arrival of such visits last year.

Is it a possible positive Brexit spin-off for the Victorian harbour that is itself the subject of its regeneration plans?

The Jasmine alongside at Dun LaoghaireThe Jasmine alongside at Dun Laoghaire

The trawlers, that catch Whitefish, on Cardigan Bay off the Welsh coast used to land in Liverpool but current Brexit arrangements are causing difficulties leading to the requirement for deepwater alternatives.

The six-metre draft of the trawlers is just too deep for other east coast ports (other than Dublin) so Dun Laoghaire Harbour is proving a convenient and well-serviced location.

The Carlisle Pier provides easy access for trucks to take the catch to market. And it's not the only port the Belgians are accessing, they are also landing fish in Cork, according to local sources.

The main fishing grounds of the Belgians are the southern and central North Sea, accounting for 44 per cent of total catches. Other important fishing grounds are the English Channel (26 per cent), the Celtic Sea (18 per cent) and the Irish Sea (8 per cent).

The Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Charlie McConalogue TD, announced this morning details of a €38.3m Capital Investment Package for the ongoing development of Ireland’s publicly owned harbour network including 79 Local Authority Harbours across 12 coastal Local Authorities.

See funding allocations below

In announcing the 2021 programme, the Minister said, “I am delighted to announce this €38.3 million capital investment package in our six Fishery Harbour Centres and 79 Local Authority owned piers and harbours around our coast which underlines the importance this Government places on the contribution of the wider Seafood sector to Ireland’s economy and to rural coastal communities in particular.”

Essential repairs to a fisherman's pontoon has been granted €72,750 and  slipway improvement works were awarded €60,000 at Kinsale Harbour in West CorkEssential repairs to a fisherman's pontoon have been granted €72,750 and  slipway improvement works were awarded €60,000 at Kinsale Harbour in West Cork

The Local Authority programme which forms part of the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marines’ 2021 Fishery Harbour and Coastal Infrastructure Development Programme, whereby the Department co-funds up to 75% of the total cost of approved projects with the Local Authority providing the balance (see table 1 below).

In regard to the Local Authority scheme, the Minister stated, “It was important to me to place added importance on the Local Authority scheme this year and I am pleased to be to in a position to announce an enhanced €4.2 million programme in 2021 to assist Coastal Local Authorities in the repair and development of fishery and aquaculture linked marine infrastructures under their ownership. This year I have redirected savings due to Covid limitations on other projects to increase the monies available to the Local Authorities resulting in a 35% increase in 2020 allocations. Together with funding from Local Authorities, the total amount to be invested in local piers and harbours in 2021 under this scheme comes to €5.6 million.”

 €30,000 has been granted for the installation of a pontoon at the West Pier in Dun Laoghaire Harbour €30,000 has been granted for the installation of a pontoon at the West Pier in Dun Laoghaire Harbour

Minister McConologue went on to say, “The €4.2 million package I am making available this year provides funding for a diverse suite of 79 projects geographically spread across 12 Local Authorities which will improve the amenities provided to the wider Marine community in these coastal areas. It will provide a much needed economic boost to rural coastal communities particularly in these trying times and also make them more attractive to tourists in the longer term. During the pandemic, we have become more aware than ever of the importance of our outdoor spaces and local amenities. The continued upgrading and refurbishment of our local piers and harbours will support local fishers, tourism and will have numerous knock-on benefits for local economies. This again demonstrates our Government’s commitment to rural Ireland.”

New development works are budgeted for at the Fishery Harbour at Howth in County Dublin   New development works are budgeted for at the Fishery Harbour at Howth in County Dublin

Overall, the annual Fishery Harbour and Coastal Infrastructure Development Programme provides funding for safety, maintenance and new development works at the six Fishery Harbour Centres at Howth, Dunmore East, Castletownbere, Dingle, Ros An Mhíl and Killybegs (see Table 2 below).

The primary function of the Fishery Harbour Centres is to underpin the ongoing development of the fisheries and seafood processing sectors, while also facilitating other diverse marine-related activities.

The Minister said, “Critically, this year’s funding for the Fishery Harbour Centres provides for the completion of three strategically important projects in Castletownbere, Killybegs and Howth, delivering an additional 460 metres of berthing space in the respective harbours. These projects have experienced delays as a result of the necessary Covid restrictions. This is in accordance with Action 65 of my Department’s 2021 Action Plan. Additionally, a number of new projects are commencing across the six Fishery Harbour Centres continuing the improvements being made in facilities available to fishermen and other harbour users."

The Minister concluded by saying “All told, €140 million has been invested in the Fishery Harbour Centres between 2010 and 2020, with a further €31 million invested in Local Authority owned marine infrastructure over the same period. This years €38.3 million investment in 2021 will create short term employment in some of the most rural coastal communities during the works, as well as reinforcing the strategies for diversification and to develop an environment for long term, sustainable economic opportunities around our coast.”

Table 1: The 79 approved capital projects across 12 Coastal Local Authorities approved for funding in 2021

County Council

 

Location

 

Works

 

Total Project Cost

 

Grant Aid Approved by DAFM

 

Clare County Council

 

Bournapeaka Pier (Ballyaughan)

 

Pier Repairs

 

200,000

 

150,000

 
 

Seafield Pier, Quilty

 

The installation of a crane to enable the fishermen to safely load and offload their boats.

 

35,000

 

26,250

 
 

Doolin Pier

 

Pier upgrades including installation of additional mooring bollards.

 

73,718

 

55,289

 
 

Carrowmore Slipway, Doonbeg

 

Reconstruction of the slipway wall.

 

30,000

 

22,500

 
 

Seafield Pier, Quilty

 

Repairs to pier

 

5,000

 

3,750

 
 

Doonmore Pier, Doonbeg

 

Provision of floating ramped access platform, to provide easy access between the pier & the floating pontoon platform.

 

35,000

 

26,250

 
 

Carrigaholt (old) Pier

 

Repairs and upgrade to pier

 

32,000

 

24,000

 
 

Carrigaholt (old) Pier

 

Repairs to quay wall

 

10,000

 

7,500

 
 

Seafield Pier, Quilty

 

Repairs to quay wall and slipway

 

25,000

 

18,750

 
 

                                                         Total Clare County Council

 

445,718

 

334,289

 

Cork County Council

 

Kinsale Harbour -  Fisherman's Pontoon

Phase 1

 

Essential Pontoon Repairs

 

97,000

 

72,750

 
 

Keelbeg

 

Safety Improvement Works

 

200,000

 

150,000

 
 

Ballycotton Pier                        

 

Pier Improvement Works:                      

 

60,000

 

45,000

 
 

Ballycrovane Pier

 

Pier improvement works and safety signage

 

55,000

 

41,250

 
 

Kinsale Harbour - Slips  Phase 1

 

Slip Improvement works to various slips and safety signage                                            

 

80,000

 

60,000

 
 

Traavarra

 

Pier Remedial /Safety Improvement Works and safety signage                

 

30,000

 

22,500

 
 

Zetland Pier

 

Safety Improvement Works and safety signage.

 

124,000

 

93,000

 
 

Total Cork County Council

 

646,000

 

484,500

 

Donegal County Council

 

Leenan Slipway

 

Construction of slipway.

 

200,000

 

150,000

 
 

Portnoo Crane

 

Installation of a pier crane and associated works.

 

80,000

 

60,000

 
 

Greencastle

 

Electrical upgrade and installation of CCTV

 

80,000

 

60,000

 
 

Ballyshannon

 

Slipway Repair

 

40,000

 

30,000

 
 

Downings

 

Repair works

 

40,000

 

30,000

 
 

Bunaninver

 

Pier head repairs and provision of signage and railings.

 

30,000

 

22,500

 
 

Binwee (Magheragallon)

 

Pier upgrade works.

 

30,000

 

22,500

 
 

Bundoran Pier

 

Pier repairs and upgrade

 

40,000

 

30,000

 
 

Portnablagh Pier

 

Pier and slipway upgrade, signage railings etc.

 

30,000

 

22,500

 
 

Mevagh

 

Installation of berthing pontoon and access gangway

 

200,000

 

150,000

 
 

Lahardan

 

Breakwater repairs

 

40,000

 

30,000

 
 

Ballywhoriskey

 

New pontoon, anchors and access gangway.

 

40,000

 

30,000

 
 

Total Donegal County Council

 

850,000

 

637,500

 

Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

 

Coliemore Harbour

 

Remedial repairs.

 

100,000

 

75,000

 
 

Traders Wharf, Dun Laoghaire Harbour

 

Water and electrical upgrades

 

45,000

 

33,750

 
 

West Pier, Dun Laoghaire Harbour

 

Installation of  pontoon.

 

40,000

 

30,000

 
 

Total Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council

 

185,000

 

138,750

 

Fingal County Council

 

Loughshinny Harbour

 

Reconditioning and re-strengthening of pavement and sea wall and ancillaries

 

80,000

 

60,000

 
 

Skerries

 

Replacement of existing AToN serving Skerries Harbour, Replacement of existing fenders serving the outer pier at Skerries Harbour

 

70,000

 

52,500

 
 

Balbriggan Harbour

 

Replacement and installation of 3 x ladders serving Balbriggan Harbour

 

40,000

 

30,000

 
 

Total Fingal County Council

 

190,000

 

142,500

 

Galway County Council

 

Inisboffin Harbour

 

Upgrade works, safety works, replace moorings etc.

 

138,984

 

104,238

 
 

Cleggan

 

Repair and upgrading works to pier and crane

 

90,800

 

68,100

 
 

Safety Bundle 1. Aughrusmor, Ard Mór Pier, Kilkieran, Aibhnin, Maumeen, Caladh Feenish, Trawbaun

 

Safety works

 

75,000

 

56,250

 
 

Derryinver

 

Repair works and safety signage

 

50,000

 

37,500

 
 

An tOilean Mór

 

Repair and safety works and safety signage

 

22,000

 

16,500

 
 

Safety Bunde 2. Rinville, Blackweir, Killeenaran, Tarrea, Kinvarra, Parkmore, Newtown Lynch Pier

 

Repair works and safety signage

 

50,000

 

37,500

 
 

Garafin - Rosmuc

 

Repair and safety works and safety signage

 

34,000

 

25,500

 
 

Total Galway County Council

 

460,784

 

345,588

 

Kerry County Council

 

Dún Chaoin Pier

 

Repair works and development of new slipway

 

100,000

 

75,000

 
 

Knightstown Marina

 

Replace breakwater pontoon and electrical bollards at Knightstown Marina

 

145,000

 

108,750

 
 

Dooneen Pier (Feohanagh)

 

Repair works

 

40,000

 

30,000

 
 

Total Kerry County Council 

 

285,000

 

213,750

 

Mayo County Council

 

Porturlin Harbour

 

Improvement works on the Pier/sea wall

 

200,000

 

150,000

 
 

Purteen Harbour Achill

 

Remediation works on slipway and safety improvement works.

 

45,000

 

33,750

 
 

Roigh

 

Remedial works on pier.

 

70,000

 

52,500

 
 

Rinroe Pier, Kilgalligan

 

Safety improvement works, replacement of ladders and railings

 

60,000

 

45,000

 
 

Killerduff Pier

 

Remove rocks and debris from harbour area. Repairs to slipway and breakwater wall.

 

60,000

 

45,000

 
 

Belderrig Pier

 

Safety improvement works, including replacement of the existing winch system, ladders and railings.

 

150,000

 

112,500

 
 

Kilcummin Harbour

 

Repairs to old breakwater wall, and safety works to slipway and pier.

 

100,000

 

75,000

 
 

Mulranny

 

Remedial works to pier / sea wall.

 

150,000

 

112,500

 
 

Total Mayo County Council

 

835,000

 

626,250

 

Sligo County  Council

 

Aughris Pier

 

Repairs to pier.

 

70,000

 

52,500

 
 

Easkey Pier

 

Pier repairs

 

200,000

 

150,000

 
 

Total Sligo County Council

 

270,000

 

202,500

 

Waterford County Council

 

Helvick Pier

 

Pier upgrades

 

200,000

 

150,000

 
 

Tramore North Pier

 

Pier upgrade and remediation works

 

200,000

 

150,000

 
 

Cheekpoint Pier

 

Pier repair, upgrade and remediation works..

 

200,000

 

150,000

 
 

Ballinacourty Pier

 

Pier repairs and small scale dredging.

 

70,000

 

52,500

 
 

Bunmahon Slipway - West Side

 

installation of handrails to existing slipway for health and safety improvements.

 

10,000

 

7,500

 
 

Total Waterford County Council

 

680,000

 

510,000

 

Wexford County Council

 

Kilmore Quay 1

 

Upgrade of power points

 

80,000

 

60,000

 
 

Kilmore Quay 2

 

Repair to Quay walls

 

25,000

 

18,750

 
 

Duncannon 1

 

New Waste Oil Tank

 

20,000

 

15,000

 
 

Kilmore Quay 3

 

Mooring Bollards

 

25,000

 

18,750

 
 

Fethard harbour

 

Public lighting of harbour

 

40,000

 

30,000

 
 

Ballyhack

 

Mooring rings, repointing

 

30,000

 

22,500

 
 

Wexford Harbour 1

 

Remedial works to Ferrybank slipway

 

30,000

 

22,500

 
 

Kilmore Quay 4

 

Access ladder on west pier

 

18,000

 

13,500

 
 

Wexford Harbour 2

 

Power supply on quay

 

60,000

 

45,000

 
 

New Ross Marina

 

Repair works to marina

 

25,000

 

18,750

 
 

Kilmore Quay Marina 1

 

Repair works to marina

 

30,000

 

22,500

 
 

Cahore 1

 

Provide barrier system on slipway

 

20,000

 

15,000

 
 

Killurin

 

Repair of quay walls

 

12,000

 

9,000

 
 

Kilmore Quay Marina 2

 

Painting of marina piles

 

30,000

 

22,500

 
 

Total Wexford County Council

 

445,000

 

333,750

 

Wicklow County Council

 

Inner Dock, South Quay Arklow  and Main Berth on South Quay, Arklow

 

Replacement of fenders with new fendering system.

 

60,000

 

45,000

 
 

South Quay, Wicklow

 

Pier upgrade, safety works and utility upgrade.

 

70,000

 

52,500

 
 

North and South Quay, Arklow

 

Ladder replacement programme throughout Arklow Harbour - Quays and Piers

 

45,000

 

33,750

 
 

South Quay, Arklow Harbour

 

Upgrading works to the slipway at the Inner Dock, South Quay.

 

35,000

 

26,250

 
 

Greystones Harbour

 

Safety works including installation of demarcation buoys and the provision of a swim raft/platform within the public harbour.

 

32,000

 

24,000

 
 

Wicklow Harbour

 

Repairs and surfacing of sections of the slipway.

 

30,000

 

22,500

 
 

Total Wicklow County Council

 

272,000

 

204,000

 

Total Projects Cost

 

5,564,502

 

 

 

Total Grant Aid Approved

     

4,173,377

 

Table 2: The overall Fishery Harbour & Coastal Infrastructure Development Programme 2021

Location

 

Project Description

 

Cost €m

   

Howth:-

 

Middle Pier Berthing Face

Harbour Workshop

Harbour Master & Engineering Office

Harbour Dredging

Other Contractual Commitments

CCTV Upgrade

Fishermans’ toilet & shower facility

No 11 West Pier Building Upgrade

Boat store upgrade

Safety and Maintenance

Disability Access

 

6.00

0.90

0.05

0.20

0.30

0.075

0.15

0.25

0.05

0.30

0.02

   
   

Total

 

8.295

   

Dunmore East:-

 

South Pier/Wharf upgrade work

Site 18 – Replace building

X-Block protection of East Pier breakwater

Industrial Effluent Pipeline

Water Metering

Other Contractual Commitments

Safety and Maintenance

Disability Access

 

0.30

0.25

0.60

0.50

0.40

0.05

0.30

0.02

   
   

Total

 

2.42

   

Castletownbere:-

 

Dinish Island pier extension

Castletownbere Slipway

Mainland Quay Wall repairs

Syncrolift Dredging upgrade works

Water Metering

Re-route Dinish Sewer network

Other Contractual Commitments

Safety and Maintenance

Disability Access

 

6.8

2.00

0.35

0.70

0.50

0.40

0.65

0.35

0.02

   
   

Total

 

11.77

   

Dingle:-

 

Upgrade Marine Facilities Building

Other Contractual Commitments

Safety and Maintenance

Disability Access

 

0.50

0.30

0.30

0.02

   

 

 

Total

 

1.12

   

 

Ros an Mhíl:-

 

Deep Water Quay

Upgrade of Harbour Master offices

Net storage Area

CCTV upgrade

Other Contractual commitments

Safety and Maintenance

Disability Access

 

0.10

0.20

0.10

0.03

0.39

     0.25

0.02

 
   

Total

 

1.09

 

Killybegs:-

 

Smooth Point Pier Extension (Phase 2)

Small Craft Harbour service building

Landing Pier Fendering

Boat Repair Building Extension

Harbour Master stores

Plant & Material storage shed in shipyard

Other Contractual Commitments

Safety and Maintenance

Disability Access       

 

6.50

0.65

0.55

0.07

0.25

0.25

0.02

0.40

0.02

 
   

Total

 

8.71

 

Total FHC’s

 

 

 

33.405

 

 

Cape Clear

 

Safety and Maintenance

Duffy’s Pier remedial works (Phase 2) & road improvement

Disability Access       

 

 

0.04

0.60

0.01

 

 

 

Total

 

0.65

 

Local Authority

 

Local Authority Programme

 

4.2

 

PLBs

 

Piers, Lights and Beacons

 

0.024

 

Total

 

Total 2021 Fishery Harbour and Coastal Infrastructure Development Programme

 

38.279

Published in Irish Harbours
Tagged under
Page 9 of 68

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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