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Displaying items by tag: Inland Fisheries Ireland

#ANGLING - The 30-day public consultation on new regulations for the management of the 2012 wild salmon and sea trout fishery will expire next Thursday, The Irish Times reports.

The new regulations are based on advice from Inland Fisheries Ireland following an assessment of 141 rivers nationwide by the Salmon Standing Scientific Committee.

That assessment recommended that that 43 rivers should open (seven fewer than in 2011); 34 rivers should open for catch-and-release (six more than 2011); and 64 rivers should be closed (one fewer than 2011).

New conservation rules include bag limit for sea trout and a restriction on angling for other species when fishing for salmon on closed rivers.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling
#ANGLING - The public fishing pond at Darndale is "crying out for help" after an infestation of curly weed, The Irish Times reports.
A public meeting to discuss the issue recently heard that the invasive plant has spread throughout the entire pond, making casting all but impossible.
“We have a catchment of some 3,000 youngsters and adults who are deprived of fishing in their locality," said Brian Conneely of Sphere 17 Youth Service. "It’s a sad state of affairs.”
The meeting also heard of a possible solution to the problem, with Dr Joe Caffrey of Inland Fisheries Ireland suggesting a covering of jute or sacking to kill off the weed and allow the growth of native plants - a plan that appears to be working in Lough Corrib.
Costing is the issue, however, with such a jute priced at around €5,000. Maryann Harris of Dublin City Council's parks division said she was exploring grants to fund the project.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

#ANGLING - The public fishing pond at Darndale is "crying out for help" after an infestation of curly weed, The Irish Times reports.

A public meeting to discuss the issue recently heard that the invasive plant has spread throughout the entire pond, making casting all but impossible.

“We have a catchment of some 3,000 youngsters and adults who are deprived of fishing in their locality," said Brian Conneely of Sphere 17 Youth Service. "It’s a sad state of affairs.”

The meeting also heard of a possible solution to the problem, with Dr Joe Caffrey of Inland Fisheries Ireland suggesting a covering of jute or sacking to kill off the weed and allow the growth of native plants - a plan that appears to be working in Lough Corrib.

Costing is the issue, however, with such a jute priced at around €5,000. Maryann Harris of Dublin City Council's parks division said she was exploring grants to fund the project.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling
#INLAND WATERWAYS - Minister for Natural Resources, Pat Rabbitte has announced that a settlement has been reached ahead of a court case over the removal of Clondulane Weir on the River Blackwater in Co Cork.
Lismore Realty Ltd and Lismore Trust Ltd has brought judicial review proceedings against the then minister over the department's direction in 2006 requiring the removal of the weird to allow for the free passage of migratory fish in line with national and European legislation.
The removal of the weir will now proceed folliwng the settlement, which terms that the parties will bear their own costs and Lismore Realty Ltd and Lismore Trust Ltd. will pay all reasonable costs of the removal of the weir, set to take place next summer.
Inland Fisheries Ireland will act as agents of the minister and manage the removal of the structure so as to minimise the impact on flora, fauna and habitat in the river, which is in a designated Special Area of Conservation.

#INLAND WATERWAYS - Minister for Natural Resources Pat Rabbitte has announced that a settlement has been reached ahead of a court case over the removal of Clondulane Weir on the River Blackwater in Co Cork.

Lismore Realty Ltd and Lismore Trust Ltd has brought judicial review proceedings against the then minister over the department's direction in 2006 requiring the removal of the weird to allow for the free passage of migratory fish in line with national and European legislation.

The removal of the weir will now proceed folliwng the settlement, which terms that the parties will bear their own costs, and Lismore Realty Ltd and Lismore Trust Ltd will pay all reasonable costs of the removal of the weir, set to take place next summer.  

Inland Fisheries Ireland will act as agents of the minister and manage the removal of the structure so as to minimise the impact on flora, fauna and habitat in the river, which is in a designated Special Area of Conservation.

Published in Inland Waterways
#ANGLING - The Irish Fly Fair and Angling Show at the Galway Bay Hotel next weekend be "the biggest of its kind in Ireland", hosting the largest number of fly tyers and trade stands from over 15 countries, according to organisers.
The two-day exhibition, now in its second year, will welcome some of the world's top fly tyers and angling celebrities to Salthill.
As with the first event last November, visitors will have the opportunity to learn from the world's best fly dressers and casters, with tuition provided by APGAI Ireland.
Returning angling celebs Hywel Morgan, Glenda Powell, Stevie Munn, Paddy McDonnell, Peter O’Reilly will be joined by newcomer Scott MacKenzie to advise on all aspects of fly fishing.
Among the new events this year is the youth fly tying competition, giving younger anglers a chance to show the pros what they can do.
Experts from Inland Fisheries Ireland, the Wild Trout Trust and many more will also be hosting talks and seminar on various angling-related topics.
And all that is aside from the huge trade aspect of the weekend.
"Building on the success of last year’s show, where business was brisk, the 2011 show has attracted trade from all over Europe who are keen to come to Galway and exhibit to the Irish market," said organiser Grace McDermott.
For more details on the second annual Irish Fly Fair and Angling Show visit www.irishflyfair.com.

#ANGLING - The Irish Fly Fair and Angling Show at the Galway Bay Hotel next weekend be "the biggest of its kind in Ireland", hosting the largest number of fly tyers and trade stands from over 15 countries, according to organisers.

The two-day exhibition, now in its second year, will welcome some of the world's top fly tyers and angling celebrities to Salthill.

As with the first event last November, visitors will have the opportunity to learn from the world's best fly dressers and casters, with tuition provided by APGAI Ireland.

Returning angling celebs Hywel Morgan, Glenda Powell, Stevie Munn, Paddy McDonnell, Peter O’Reilly will be joined by newcomer Scott MacKenzie to advise on all aspects of fly fishing.

Among the new events this year is the youth fly tying competition, giving younger anglers a chance to show the pros what they can do.

Experts from Inland Fisheries Ireland, the Wild Trout Trust and many more will also be hosting talks and seminar on various angling-related topics. 

And all that is aside from the huge trade aspect of the weekend.

"Building on the success of last year’s show, where business was brisk, the 2011 show has attracted trade from all over Europe who are keen to come to Galway and exhibit to the Irish market," said organiser Grace McDermott. 

For more details on the second annual Irish Fly Fair and Angling Show visit www.irishflyfair.com.

Published in Angling
The ESB has made an agreement with Shannon Fisheries Preservation and Development Co to establish the new Shannon Fisheries Partnership, The Irish Times reports.
The new group will comprise representatives from both bodies as well as Inland Fisheries Ireland, and will be independently chaired by former Shannon Fisheries Board CEO Eamon Cusack.
The plan is for anglers, fishery authorities and stakeholders to come together to assist in the management of the River Shannon.
At the group's launch in Athlone recently, Cusack said the partnership was working toward ensuring a sustainable yield of fish.
The ESB has made an agreement with Shannon Fisheries Preservation and Development Co to establish the new Shannon Fisheries Partnership, The Irish Times reports.

The new group will comprise representatives from both bodies as well as Inland Fisheries Ireland, and will be independently chaired by former Shannon Fisheries Board CEO Eamon Cusack.

The plan is for anglers, fishery authorities and stakeholders to come together to assist in the management of the River Shannon.

At the group's launch in Athlone recently, Cusack said the partnership was working toward ensuring a sustainable yield of fish.
Published in Angling
Atlantic salmon have joined four other native fish on a 'red list' of endangered species compiled by the Ireland's fisheries and wildlife agencies.
As the Irish Independent reports, one third of the State's 15 native fish species are considered endangered or vulnerable.
One of the worst hit is the European eel, which was found to be critically endangered.
In a report published yesterday, a number of threats were highlighted such as water pollution, invasive species, overfishing, poor river management and climate change.
According to The Irish Times, the Red List was compiled by scientists from organisations across the island including Inland Fisheries Ireland, the National Parks and Wildlife Service, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and the National Biodiversity Data Centre.
The news comes just a few days after Dublin celebrated the return of wild Atlantic salmon to the River Tolka after more than a century.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Atlantic salmon have joined four other native fish on a 'red list' of endangered species compiled by the Ireland's fisheries and wildlife agencies.

As the Irish Independent reports, one third of the State's 15 native fish species are considered endangered or vulnerable.

One of the worst hit is the European eel, which was found to be critically endangered.

In a report published yesterday, a number of threats were highlighted such as water pollution, invasive species, overfishing, poor river management and climate change.

According to The Irish Times, the Red List was compiled by scientists from organisations across the island including Inland Fisheries Ireland, the National Parks and Wildlife Service, the Northern Ireland Environment Agency and the National Biodiversity Data Centre.

The news comes just a few days after Dublin celebrated the return of wild Atlantic salmon to the River Tolka after more than a century.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling
2nd September 2011

Welcome Boon for the River Moy

The New York Times recently paid a visit to the River Moy in Co Sligo, where angling has experienced a resurgance in recent years.
Since the ban on drift netting off Irish shores in 2007, salmon numbers in the Moy have risen to 75,000 annually, according to Inland Fisheries Ireland.
It's a welcome boon for the River Moy, which also suffered the effects of dregding for agricultural purposes in the 1960s which "cripped much of the integrity of the river’s substrata away, creating the equivalent of a featureless canal through much of its course."
Weirs and spawning gravel in tributary streams have helped the Moy to recover some of its former glory, and the river now welcomes thousands of anglers each year - especially to the top spots in Ballina town centre.
The New York Times has more on the story HERE.

The New York Times recently paid a visit to the River Moy in Co Sligo, where angling has experienced a resurgance in recent years.

Since the ban on drift netting off Irish shores in 2007, salmon numbers in the Moy have risen to 75,000 annually, according to Inland Fisheries Ireland.

It's a welcome boon for the River Moy, which also suffered the effects of dregding for agricultural purposes in the 1960s which "cripped much of the integrity of the river’s substrata away, creating the equivalent of a featureless canal through much of its course."

Weirs and spawning gravel in tributary streams have helped the Moy to recover some of its former glory, and the river now welcomes thousands of anglers each year - especially to the top spots in Ballina town centre.

The New York Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Angling
Some 17 projects have been approved for funding under the Salmon Conservation Fund, The Irish Times reports.
The pilot scheme by Inland Fisheries Ireland is designed to help angling clubs and fishery owners restore salmon stocks in Ireland's rivers.
The successful applicants across 11 counties will receive a share from more than €120,000 derived from salmon licence-holder contributions.
Accepted projects include spawning enhancement, bank protection, fish passage and habitat improvement. Priority was given to rivers below conservation limits.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Some 17 projects have been approved for funding under the Salmon Conservation Fund, The Irish Times reports.

The pilot scheme by Inland Fisheries Ireland is designed to help angling clubs and fishery owners restore salmon stocks in Ireland's rivers.

The successful applicants across 11 counties will receive a share from more than €120,000 derived from salmon licence-holder contributions.

Accepted projects include spawning enhancement, bank protection, fish passage and habitat improvement. Priority was given to rivers below conservation limits. 

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways
Pupils at Donard National School fended off competition from across Ireland to win a coveted prize in the Inland Fisheries Ireland 'Something Fishy' competition for 2011, the New Ross Standard reports.
Wexford footballer Brian Malone presented fifth and sixth class pupils at Donard NS with goodie bags and an award for their entry 'Something Fishy - The Musical', which features songs and dances about the ecosystem of their local River Boro.
Dr Ciaran Byrne, IFI chief executive Dr Ciaran Byrne, who was on hand at the prizegiving ceremony at the Wexford Education Centre in Enniscorthy, commented on all entrants: “You guys are the caretakers of this environment and if you take this message with you today we will have a much better environment in 20 years’ time.”
More than 160 schools and 7,000 children took part this year in the 'Something Fishy' initiative, which is now in its sixth year of encouraging primary schoolchildren to explore different aspects of fish life.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Pupils at Donard National School fended off competition from across Ireland to win a coveted prize in the Inland Fisheries Ireland 'Something Fishy' competition for 2011, the New Ross Standard reports.

Wexford footballer Brian Malone presented fifth and sixth class pupils at Donard NS with goodie bags and an award for their entry 'Something Fishy - The Musical', which features songs and dances about the ecosystem of their local River Boro.

Dr Ciaran Byrne, IFI chief executive Dr Ciaran Byrne, who was on hand at the prizegiving ceremony at the Wexford Education Centre in Enniscorthy, commented on all entrants: “You guys are the caretakers of this environment and if you take this message with you today we will have a much better environment in 20 years’ time.”

More than 160 schools and 7,000 children took part this year in the 'Something Fishy' initiative, which is now in its sixth year of encouraging primary schoolchildren to explore different aspects of fish life. 

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways
Minister for Natural Resources Pat Rabbitte has announced plans to reopen licensed commercial fishing in Castlemaine Harbour in Co Kerry, following the results of last year's pilot fishery.
“I am satisfied, based on scientific and fishery management advice... that it is safe to reopen this fishery under closely controlled conditions," said Minister Rabbitte. "The trial fishing conducted in the harbour last year establishes that this can be done without impinging on threatened stocks."
A statutory 30-day public consultation has now commenced on the required amendment to the Wild Salmon and Sea Trout Tagging Scheme 2011 to provide for the fishery's reopening.
"The consultation period will give those who disagree with that conclusion to put forward their views and I will pay close attention to what they say before reaching a final conclusion on the matter," the minister added.
Minister Rabbitte has also tasked Inland Fisheries Ireland with ensuring full enforcement of relevant quotas and conservation by-laws.

Minister for Natural Resources Pat Rabbitte has announced plans to reopen licensed commercial fishing in Castlemaine Harbour in Co Kerry, following the results of last year's pilot fishery.   

“I am satisfied, based on scientific and fishery management advice... that it is safe to reopen this fishery under closely controlled conditions," said Minister Rabbitte. "The trial fishing conducted in the harbour last year establishes that this can be done without impinging on threatened stocks."

A statutory 30-day public consultation has now commenced on the required amendment to the Wild Salmon and Sea Trout Tagging Scheme 2011 to provide for the fishery's reopening.  

"The consultation period will give those who disagree with that conclusion to put forward their views and I will pay close attention to what they say before reaching a final conclusion on the matter," the minister added.

Minister Rabbitte has also tasked Inland Fisheries Ireland with ensuring full enforcement of relevant quotas and conservation by-laws.

Published in Fishing
Page 37 of 38

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

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