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Dun Laoghaire based Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School reports a strong demand to get afloat as the country continues to reopen.

There’s such a demand that a new recruitment campaign is underway with watersport and instructor roles for all levels and qualifications. The team at the school are focusing in particular on Dinghy Instructors for their weekday school programmes, powerboat instructors for fully booked weekend courses right up to the end of November and Cruising Instructors for the 2022 season.

Speaking as the recruitment campaign got underway, Chief Instructor Kenneth Rumball describes the schools’ plans for the remainder of 2021 and into 2022 as “shifting from keeping afloat due to COVID-19 towards a busy and fulfilling set of expanded programmes that support the entire marine community through informative and entertaining beginner and intermediate courses”. The school is determined to make the most of a significant increase in interest in watersports and predicts a busy 2022.

The INSS's First 36.7 LulabelleThe INSS's First 36.7 Lulabelle

Glyn Williams has moved from a communications and marketing role in the school to run the busy operation and describes one of the main objectives as “creating regular employment opportunities for instructors, that fit their schedule and allow us to work as a team to increase sailing and powerboating participation”. Glyn was recently joined in the school office by Vonnie Airey, who heads up the Sales and Administration team following the retirement of Wicklow Sailor Dave Ballasty. The school wanted to publicly put on record their thanks and appreciation to Dave who spent the last few years overhauling administration and sales procedures, as well as significantly expanding the weekday primary and second level school programmes.

Part of the INSS's RIB fleet departing Dun Laoghaire HarbourPart of the INSS's RIB fleet departing Dun Laoghaire Harbour

To help fulfil their ambitions, there is a recruitment campaign underway currently for Irish Sailing Dinghy Instructors, Irish Sailing Powerboat Instructors and Cruising Instructors.

All roles have the benefit of a full-time admin and operations support team, “allowing instructors to focus on what they do best – the teaching” according to Kenneth Rumball.

Full details on the roles here

The INSS's sailing waters at Dun Laoghaire HarbourThe INSS's sailing waters at Dun Laoghaire Harbour 

Published in INSS

Ireland's largest sailing school, the Irish National Sailing School on Dublin Bay, has welcomed this week's announcement of new pontoon facilities near its base at the West Pier of Dun Laoghaire Harbour

School Principal Alistair Rumball told Afloat "we have long campaigned on safety grounds for the installation of a pontoon to give the school and other users direct access to the harbour waters at the West Pier and it's great to see this now approved".

The new pontoon, to be installed by Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Councill will be located at the public steps close to the DMYC at the West Pier.   The new pontoon, to be installed by Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Councill will be located at the public steps close to the DMYC at the West Pier. Photo: Google Earth  

The €40,000 pontoon is one of a number of approved harbour works under a €38m government scheme as Afloat reported here

The new pontoon, to be installed by Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Councill, will be located at the public steps close to the DMYC at the West Pier.

Local TD Cormac Devlin has also welcomed the new pontoon as part of a number of improvement measures for Dublin Harbours

The Irish National Sailing School has produced end of the year summary of its sailing highlights at Dun Laoghaire Harbour in County Dublin, a season like no other due to COVID-19.

"We don't want to forget 2020, the goodwill, support and friendship from staff and customers that can never be diminished", says the centre's Glynn Williams.

Unfortunately, COVID restrictions meant that participation figures fell dramatically in 2020 at the country's biggest sailing school.

The INSS says it has seen around half of the 2019 participation levels of 8,000 students and while that obviously has been a financial challenge, the level of appreciation we have for each of our participants in 2020 is unmeasurable.

The INSS also says it regards itself as 'beyond lucky' because, as an outdoor operator, they’ve been able to safely operate more of our courses and programmes than most would imagine. However, this wouldn’t have been possible without the overwhelming support of all our customers and students, who fully cooperated with every measure, change due to restrictions and direction. Read Williams full report here.

INSS Video

The go-ahead school and club located at the town's West Pier have produced a video again but this year centre Principal Kenny Rumball says the theme of 2020 is on 'giving a huge thank you to the INSS staff, for all the work they have put in, and to the INSS customers for their understanding, cooperation and trust during the COVID-19 pandemic'.

"We're looking forward to getting your afloat in 2021 when its safe to do so" he adds. 

Check out the vid below

2021 Restrictions

Meanwhile, with the extension to Level 5 measures running until the end of January INSS says, unfortunately, it is unable to run quite a number of programmes but is hoping to do in the near future when government guidelines permit it and it is safe to do so.

Published in INSS

Ever thought about packing in the Job and heading to sea? Well, that’s just what Dublin Bay sailors Rachel Williamson and Marty O’Leary did last year! Last August, they set sail in Éalú, they first heading south to Spain and on to the Canaries before heading transatlantic to Barbados! After spending some time cruising the Caribbean, with the odd trip for competitive sailing in the Melges 24 class, they had to cut short the experience due to the Coronavirus situation.

Back in Ireland, they’re joining Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School Chief Instructor Kenneth Rumball for a Zoom Q & A on the whole experience, taking in the preparation, what training and experience they had and what it was like. The chat is scheduled for 7 pm on Friday the 15th of May.

There’s a small €10 fee that will be split between Rachel and Marty as well as the school. All those who join the chat will be welcome to submit questions to the pair, making it the perfect opportunity for those thinking of buying a boat and cruising the world once the pandemic concludes!

For anyone thinking of joining in, there’s no need for a camera or microphone, you can simply sit back and enjoy the conversation.

All are welcome to join in and it’s no problem if the whole household wants to join in with each booking, they're most welcome at no extra cost.

More information and booking is available here

In the meantime, for a flavour of the action, you can check out Rachel and Marty’s blog

50% of the fees for the Friday evening course will be donated to the RNLI.

Published in INSS

The first in a series of short online courses at the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School takes place this evening (Thursday) from 7 pm. Chief instructor Kenneth Rumball will be presenting a review of preparing a yacht for cruising or racing.

Next week, Kenneth will run a two-session course, on Tuesday 12th and Thursday 14th May running for two hours each evening covering “Skippering in Tidal Waters”. This course was specifically launched in response to feedback received by the school to their “Attitudes to Yacht Charter in Ireland” survey, where a number of respondents felt that Irish tides would be too much of a challenge compared to relatively easier waters of the Mediterranean.

The popular short course, Dinghy Race Tactics and Strategy, will run in an online format on Tuesday 12th, Wednesday 13th and Thursday 14th May for 2 hours each evening. Kenenth will lead the course and audience interaction and questions encouraged. Equally, although a camera or microphone is required to join - you can simply relax, view the slides and listen to the presenter as he explains both rules and strategy, and how it applies to real-life scenarios.

The courses are open to all, and everyone is welcome. Families are encouraged to all join in from one booking and the team at the school are looking forward to seeing everyone, even if only online for now!

Link to courses here

Published in INSS

The Irish National Sailing School (INSS) at Dun Laoghaire Harbour is taking the next steps to get domestic yacht charter up and running in the east coast port. 

Following a survey launched earlier in April, the INSS believes that there’s sufficient demand to have a domestic charter fleet up and running for August, on into the winter and ready for the 2021 season, driven in part by a reluctance to travel abroad caused by Coronavirus.

The school is making its two yachts available, however, capacity will quickly be met in light of the demand for the boats on the training courses. So, instead, they’re hoping that owners based on the East coast will work with them, on a profit share basis, with the school managing administration, handover, dealing with any issues during the charter and receiving the boat back and ensuring it's handed back to its owner in full working order as well as being spick and span!

The school, run by Kenneth Rumball, has been in contact with insurance providers, and upgrading cover is typically a small increase on premium. The owner would receive over half of the charter fee, and schemes in operation elsewhere usually cover the yachts annual running costs. Effectively it can be viewed as free annual boating.

Starting small, Rumball details how he sees the whole concept developing “Initially, we’d like to work with two or three owners based between Dun Laoghaire and Greystones. Interest from further afield is welcome”. The school’s survey indicates that boats in the 35-45 foot range are most likely to work in the Irish market.

A prospectus is available for interested yacht owners.

Rumball is keen to chat with any prospective owners. Tel: 01 2844195 or by email directly to [email protected]

Published in INSS

There’s a demand for short term, easily available yacht charter on Irish waters, that's according to a survey conducted earlier this month by a Dun Laoghaire Harbour Sailing School.

As Afloat reported previously, the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School in Dun Laoghaire Harbour asked those who might usually head abroad for a charter holiday what their intentions were in light of the Covid-19 epidemic.

The main aim was to see what could be done to help the domestic marine industry and get a conversation going, with actions flowing quickly.

The concept was rooted in stimulating the domestic charter market especially as family activities on a yacht may be one of the few activities that can safely get afloat this year.

Between speaking to their previous graduates from the last few years, and with help from afloat magazine data and suggestions started coming in from a very short survey.

Over 40% of respondents indicate they would be less likely to travel overseas to charter, with more than 50% indicating they would be more likely to do so in Ireland. Commenting on the figures, Communications and Marketing Manager Glyn Williams describes them as “Hardly surprising, but being able to a figure on it is great, but equally, we got plenty of insight into what barriers there are to chartering yachts, as well as some brilliant suggestions”.

What Barriers Exist for the Irish Yacht Charter Market?

The school found that the top factor considered a barrier to chartering was the value for money proposition. Equally the yacht availability, flexibility on charter duration and the clear display of this information was raised.

"Biggest barrier to chartering was the value for money proposition"

Yacht and service quality ranked next and tied into the value for money question. According to school chief instructor Kenneth Rumball, “Undoubtedly, professional management and rapid support will deal with many of these concerns, as it’s very unlikely the Irish industry would match the age and cycling of vessels in more established charter destinations”.

Yacht Charter survey(Above and below) results from the INSS Yacht Charter survey taken during the COVID-19 epidemic

Yacht Charter results2

Perceptions of skipper’s own knowledge gaps was the next most common concern. We’re competing against destinations with well-established routes, excellent marina networks and more importantly, no tides. The school is well placed here to help, according to Kenneth “training is our business, this is something we propose to address with short theory courses and tailored client support”.

Interestingly, the gaps in the marina network didn’t feature as a major concern according to Glyn. “There’s a demand for short term, easy entry charter. This doesn’t take away from calls for more infrastructure development around our coast but shows that we can grow this concept with what’s already available”.

By this stage of this article, you’re probably screaming at your screen “What about the weather!”. Glyn’s response, “Well, it certainly came up, but not nearly as much as you’d have guessed. Instead, it was framed in terms of value for money and what could be offered by providers to accommodate the Irish climate”.

What’s next?

When asked about developing the concept from the school’s perspective, Kenneth is optimistic. “We train about 300 yacht graduates each year, and the vast majority do the course to access the charter lifestyle. With some clever and targeted supports, we can easily convince those to holiday at home, especially when personal skills development can be listed as a benefit alongside spending time with the family, or partner”.

Rumball feels collaboration will be important. “We’ve already got a great relationship with James Lyons from Sovereign Sailing, and we’ll continue working together behind the scenes to advance the concept”. Other interested parties are invited to get in touch with the school.

Moving forward, the school is calling for interested yacht owners who may be interested in working with the school to expand the concept on the East Coast. Profit-share arrangements work elsewhere, participating owners typically cover all annual costs, from insurance, mooring fees and ongoing maintenance. Rumball characterises it as essentially free yachting for the owner and proposes a concept where the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School would manage bookings, administration, maintenance and all the logistics. The school has already been in contact with prospective insurers and has found premiums only typically rise around 40% to cover the charter element.

Owners can contact Kenneth Rumball by email, [email protected], or call the school’s office on 01 284 4195 for more details and a full breakdown of the proposals.

Published in INSS

The Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School in Dun Laoghaire Harbour want to hear from those who holiday abroad on charter yachts and those who may want to. Given the travel uncertainty emanating from COVID-19 restrictions, there’s a possibility to highlight the excellent cruising and holiday options here in Ireland.

Since the sailing school re-started yachting courses five years ago the vast majority of graduates both are new, or returning to sailing, and undertook the training to charter a yacht abroad.

With travel plans less certain, and the Irish tourism sector facing a huge challenge to get back on its feet the team at the school want to help those who might otherwise have skipped a sailing holiday do so in Ireland when it is safe to do so again.

Yacht Charter INSS 2The INSS has put together a two-minute survey to gauge the effect of COVID-19 on foreign charter holiday plans and to see if we can assist the Irish yacht training and charter industry in what will be a difficult year or two

INSS has launched a very short survey examining attitudes to chartering aboard and at home, and want to know what barriers exist to chartering a yacht.

The school’s chief instructor Kenneth Rumball describes their approach. “We know anecdotally that there is less demand for this sort of holiday at home, but we want to understand is there anything that we can do to change this. Ideally, we’d love to work with colleagues in the industry to help keep everyone afloat”.

The team are keen to hear your views, either by online survey or by getting in touch with the team in the office on 01 284 4195 or [email protected]

The survey can be found here

Published in INSS

It was about 1 am off the coast of County Kerry when John White came off the helm of Jedi, a J109, competing in the 2018 Round Ireland Yacht Race. Facing 30-knots on the nose and three to four metre seas, as White moved forward, a large wave crashed over the boat, knocking him overboard.

White joined helmsman Kenneth Rumball to share their learnings from the successful recovery of John, a fate that lead to Kenneth being awarded the RORC Seamanship Trophy.

INSS JediThe INSS Jedi competing in the 2018 Round Ireland Race. Photo: Afloat.ie

Both describe in detail the key points they think lead to the successful recovery of John, proper preparation, pre-sailing drills, sufficient training for all the crew and ultimately having the right gear, as well as knowing how to use it.

White describes the surreal experience of being away from the boat, and the exemplary Seamanship exploits undertaken to retrieve him safely, and indeed get back racing. Rumball shares his experiences as Skipper but emphasises how the training he provides in the day job as chief instructor at the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School kicked in. A frank and sobering discussion on the good fortune it was to correctly install AIS MOB devices, ensure that everyone had the latest lifesaving kit is undertaken.

This is a must-watch for any skipper or crew member who races offshore but would appeal to a wider audience with an interest in yachting as John and Kenneth recant the compelling story, which thankfully had a happy outcome.

 

The video (above) is divided into chapters as follows:

  • Preparation - 2 mins 30 seconds
  • Build Up - 14 mins 20 seconds
  • Man Overboard - 20 mins 20 second
  • The water - 30mins 20 seconds
  • Gear - 34 mins 40 seconds
  • Recovery - 51 mins 00 seconds
  • Rest of the Race - 1 hour 10 mins 40 seconds
Published in INSS

The Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School have just teamed up with Quarterdeck & The Yacht Week to provide Irish sailors with a gateway to become skippers and hosts and enter the world of working in the yacht charter industry.

What is Quarterdeck?

Quarterdeck is the recruitment agency for skippers and hosts worldwide. They provide a tailored Academy that polishes your current skills in order to work with their exclusive partner The Yacht Week along with several other private charter partners in destinations such as Croatia, Greece, Montenegro, British Virgin Islands and many more.

What is The Yacht Week?

“The Best Job In The World!” The Yacht Week is known as a flotilla festival, where skippers and hosts can develop their charter skills while working in a friendly environment, with a community that is there to support and help them grow.

Take it to the next level and spend a summer working at The Yacht Week. Meet friends from all over the world and be part of a truly international team. Skipper for a crew of 10 on a yacht in Croatia, Greece or Montenegro, while being a part of The Yacht Week flotilla of up to 100 yachts per week. Make lasting friendships with people from all over the world and get paid to do it. Whether you are looking to work for a couple of weeks or the entire summer, Quarterdeck wants you!

As a skipper or host for QD you are working on yachts with 6-10 guests onboard. The skipper and host are tasked with making the week exceptional for their guests while keeping them safe.

How does it work?

  1. Apply for Quarterdeck academy
  2. Get the required licences. As a partner school of Quarterdeck, the INSS is a recommended choice. The instructors are familiar with the Quarterdeck’s training programme so are the best suited for preparing you for the academy.
  3. Attend the weeklong Quarterdeck Academy (five weeks to choose from in April or May).
  4. After passing the academy, Irish sailors are officially part of the team and can now work for The Yacht Week (June, July, August).

Skipper Requirements?

  • Recognised skipper licence (ideally RYA Yachtmaster)
  • VHF licence
  • First Aid Certificate
  • A love for sailing

Questions?

Getting an RYA Licence

Contact the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School by email [email protected] or call 01 2844195.

Joining Quarterdeck Academy

The Academy applications are now open for Spring of 2020. Interested sailors should email [email protected] for any queries.

Published in INSS
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Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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