Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Killybegs

Bundoran RNLI’s volunteer lifeboat crew were requested to launch yesterday afternoon (Tuesday 22 December) to reports of a 19ft vessel that had sunk off Killybegs.

Also tasked to the scene were the Sligo-based Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 118 as well as the Killybegs Coast Guard RIB, while help was sought from other vessels in the area.

On arrival, the lifeboat crew found that two people who had been on the sunken vessel had already made their way to safety and were treated by an ambulance at the Killybegs slipway.

The lifeboat then assisted the coastguard RIB in securing the vessel.

Lifeboat helm Rory O’Connor said: “Thanks to quick actions of all involved, this was another successful outcome and the two people will get to spend Christmas with their loved ones.

“It’s another example of inter-agency cooperation and we were glad to be able to assist our Irish Coast Guard colleagues.”

The incident came just two days after another inter-agency operation to rescue a man whose small boat ran aground on rocks in Ballyshannon, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Arklow RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat Ger Tigchlearr taking a stricken fishing vessel under tow | Photo: RNLI/ArklowArklow RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat Ger Tigchlearr taking a stricken fishing vessel under tow (Photo: RNLI/Arklow)

In other lifeboat news, Arklow RNLI launched to the aid of two fishermen on a vessel in distress last Thursday 17 December.

As the volunteer crew of six were en route, further reports came in that the fishing vessel had freed the foul but was adrift and dragging its anchor — and in danger of being driven up onto the rocks at Kilmichael Point.

Once on scene, the lifeboat crew worked quickly with the casualty vessel’s crew of two to establish a tow line, before the vessel was towed safely back to Arklow.

Following the incident, Arklow RNLI community safety officer Mark Corcoran gave a special shoutout to coxswain Eddie McElheron on his first callout in command of the all-weather lifeboat Ger Tigchlearr.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport has been advised by TechWorks Marine that the lantern on the monitoring buoy in Killybegs Harbour has stopped working.

The buoy is part of environmental oceanographic monitoring for the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine in a project that began last September, and can be found at 54° 37.03' N, 008° 26.40' W.

The buoy is deployed on a dual mooring. Two small marker buoys indicate the locations of each of the buoy’s moorings. Vessel traffic will need to avoid this area.

The lantern will be repaired as soon as possible on the next viable tide and weather window. For further information contact TechWorks Marine at 01 236 5990.

Published in Marine Warning

Dredging and quay construction works will be underway at Smooth Point, Killybegs Fishery Harbour Centre from late October 2019 until July 2020.

Plant on site shall include the Capall Mara Backhoe Dredger (Callsign: MBSF3), modular pontoon dredgers, split hopper barges, tugs and other smaller vessels. Appendix 1 provides details of the location in which these works are to take place.

The works will also entail the disposal of dredge sediments at a permitted dumpsite in Donegal Bay.

For safety reasons, mariners are requested to stay clear of these sites for the duration of the works in the harbour and are requested to proceed with caution in the area of the new pier and the vicinity of the dumpsite when disposal operations are on-going. Wave wash from vessels should be avoided.

For further information, please contact Killybegs Harbour Master’s Office on +353 (0)74 9731032.

Published in Marine Warning
Tagged under

Both the Irish Naval Service and Air Corps, reports The Irish Times, are being primed to protect Irish sea fishing areas and vessels in a no-deal Brexit amid industry fears of tensions between EU and non-EU trawlers.

The UK crashing out of the EU without a deal would shut off British fishing waters to Irish trawlers and deprive the domestic fleet of access to lucrative fishing grounds that account for a third of the Irish catch.

The exclusion of fishing fleets from other EU member states from British waters would in turn increase the number of French, Spanish and Belgian trawlers in Irish fishing waters.

Sean O’Donoghue, chief executive of the Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation, one of the country’s biggest fishing industry groups, warned that there would be “flashpoints” in the Irish Sea and waters off the north-west and south-west Irish coasts if no arrangements are put in place in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

The newspaper has more here on the story.

Published in Fishing

As part of Project Ireland 2040, The Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael Creed TD, announced the signing of a €14.7 million capital works contract to deliver a 120m long quay development and associated works at Smooth Point, Killybegs Fishery Harbour Centre, Co. Donegal.

Welcoming the signing of the contract with contractor ABCO/Fugro JV, the Minister said “This is a very significant investment for the North West coast of Ireland which will be a big boost to Killybegs and Donegal in general. The Project will add a further 120 metres of workable quay space in the harbour and, as a result, will improve safety conditions in the harbour by alleviating congestion during the peak fishing season at this major port.”

This is the second phase of the Smooth Point project, the first phase involved the removal and disposal of contaminated sediments and cost in the region of €6.6m. This final phase which involves the removal of the remaining uncontaminated sediments and construction of the additional 120m quay wall was subject of a public tendering process. It is expected that works will commence in September and that the project will be substantially completed within 9 months.

The Minister went on to say that “In approving this development, I have taken account of the unprecedented success of the previous major harbour development in 2004 in increasing fish landings, driving on the development of the onshore downstream industries and attracting other commercial marine traffic in Killybegs. That success has resulted in the need for a further major expansion to manage current activity levels and future proof the harbour. This major quay wall extension will provide long-term berthing for approximately 10 large pelagic fishing trawlers and will facilitate safe stern-on berthing for the largest vessels in the Atlantic fleet.”

Minister Creed explained that “Government Policy is to substantially increase the landings into Ireland from all vessels that fish in the waters around Ireland. We want to see Ireland become the hub for all the marine activities that can be generated by the sustainable harvesting of these renewable resources in our marine sphere. Developing our Fishery Harbour Centres , such as Killybegs, to facilitate our industry and be able to attract and handle these landings is a key step in achieving our ambitions in this area, in line with the Governments integrated marine development strategy “Harnessing our Ocean Wealth” ”

In summing up, the Minister said “I view this project as a testament not only to this Governments support for the Killybegs fishing industry and the ongoing development of the wider seafood sector, but also to our commitment to the social and economic development of rural coastal communities. When completed, the new facilities will be on a par with the best in Europe, and will significantly drive forward the fishing industry and local economy in Donegal and allow for a major expansion of the seafood support sector and other marine-related industries in the North West. Killybegs has seen a marked increase in the number of cruise ships and cargo vessels docking in the harbour over recent years and it has also become the port of choice for the importation of wind turbines. The expanded landing facilities and increased quay space will provide further opportunities for greater economic diversification.”

The project has been approved in principle for funding under Ireland’s European Maritime and Fisheries Fund Operational Programme, co-funded by the Government of Ireland and the European Union.

The Minister concluded that “the Irish seafood industry faces ongoing challenges, such as the significant challenge of Brexit. By providing world-class landing facilities for our industry and for the many other EU vessels that we wish to operate out of Ireland , we are protecting our coastal communities and creating the opportunity for the seafood industry to continue to grow, prosper and facilitate a simultaneous growth of other ancillary marine industries.”

Published in Coastal Notes
Tagged under

#Lifeboats - Crosshaven RNLI launched to the aid of an injured fisherman off Graball Bay yesterday morning (Thursday 14 March).

The volunteer crew of the Crosshaven inshore lifeboat, John and Janet, were paged at 10.27am to assist a 10m fishing vessel with an injured crewman onboard.

With Aidan O’Connor in command and Norman Jackson, Georgia Keating and Molly Murphy onboard, the lifeboat met with the incoming casualty boat off Graball Bay some 12 minutes later.

Two of the lifeboat crew transferred to the fishing boat to administer casualty care to the injured man, who was in severe pain from a suspected broken arm and a head injury.

As it was deemed too dangerous due to the sea state, and too painful for the casualty, to be transferred back to the lifeboat, the fishing vessel continued to Crosshaven under escort before the injured man was handed into the care of paramedics for transfer to hospital.

Speaking following the callout, Crosshaven RNLI deputy launching authority Hugh Mokler said: “The volunteer crew responded quickly and made the casualty, who was in a great deal of pain as comfortable as possible until they were able to hand over to the ambulance service. Today, their casualty care training made a difference.”

Elsewhere, the body of a West Cork fisherman was recovered from the shoreline at Killybegs, shortly after he was reported missing yesterday afternoon.

As BreakingNews.ie reports, the man in his 50s had been working on a Cork-based boat that was docked in the Donegal fishery harbour.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#cruiseliners - Killybegs, Co. Donegal this summer will be visited by 12 cruise ships carrying 11,313 passengers.

The season DonegalNow reports will mark a first for the port town in that one of the cruise ships will berth overnight.

Barney McLaughlin who is Administrative Officer, Community and Development with Donegal Municipal District (MD) made the announcement at the January MD meeting.

He said that the overnight would take place on a Saturday and Sunday in June.

“There will be 1,300 passengers doing an overnight stay, the first we hope of many,” said Mr McLaughlin.

The ship will be carrying passengers from Germany and the USA.

Another ship will visit Killybegs on three separate occasions this year.

“This shows that Killybegs is becoming very popular,” said Mr McLaughlin.

To read more click here.

Published in Cruise Liners
Tagged under

#MarineNotice - The Marine Engineering Division of the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine is undertaking dredging works at Smooth Point in Killybegs Fishery Harbour Centre from this month till March 2018.

Plant on site shall include the backhoe dredger Capall Mara (Callsign IJFN2) as well as modular pontoon flat top dredge barges, tugs and other smaller vessels.

The Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine is also undertaking works at the east side of the Auction Hall/Landing Pier involving the installation of additional steel fendering along the face of the pier and the construction of mooring dolphins at the start of the pier.

These works shall involve the use of heavy civil engineering drilling and lifting plant. There will be a jack-up barge and a spud barge on-site during the works. Divers shall also be employed at the beginning and at the end of the project.

For safety reasons mariners are requested to stay clear of these sites during the works in the harbour and are requested to proceed with caution in the area of the new pier and the Auction Hall/Landing Pier. Wave wash from vessels should be avoided.

Further details of these works are included in Marine Notice No 58 of 2017, a PDF of which is available to read or download HERE.

Published in Fishing
Tagged under

#MarineNotice - TechWorks Marine advises that it is planning to deploy a marine monitoring buoy in Killybegs Bay that will be in place from this month till March 2018.

Part of the oceanographic monitoring for the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine, the buoy will be deployed on a dual mooring from the vessel Sinbad (Callsign EI7799).

The buoy will remain on site for a period of up to five months, after which it will be retrieved by a chartered vessel and the retrieval team.

A Sealight installed on the buoy which will give out five yellow flashes every 20 seconds. The light is visible for up to three nautical miles.

The buoy has a Special Mark as well as a small marker buoy indicating the location of each of the buoy’s moorings.

During the extent of deployment, vessel traffic will need to avoid the area. For both deployment and recovery the VHF channels monitored will be Channel 14 (Killybegs Harbour working channel) and Channel 16.

Details of the deployment are included in Marine Notice No 52 of 2017, a PDF of which is available to read or download HERE.

Published in Coastal Notes

#MarineNotice - Piling and pontoon installation works were set to commence yesterday (Tuesday 8 August) at Killybegs Fishery Harbour Centre in Co Donegal.

The works, scheduled to be completed by Monday 16 October are being carried out by an 18m x 18m jack-up barge and a 22m x 10m spud barge, and involve use of heavy civil engineering drilling and lifting plant. Divers will also be employed.

For safety reasons, mariners are requested to stay clear of the jack-up barge and spud barge during these construction works, and are requested to proceed slowly and with caution in the area of the Black Rock Pier, Town Pier, slipway and the small craft harbour. Wave wash from vessels should be avoided. See Marine Notice No 33 of 2017 for more details.

Elsewhere, Wind Cable Recovery is working on the recovery of two out-of-service communication cables (TAT 1 North Cable & TAT 1 South Cable) using vessels MV Layla (Callsign V2YX9) and the MV Lida (Callsign V2YF4). 

The recovery of these cables in the Atlantic north-west of Ireland to be completed by 10 September 2017.

These vessels will be restricted in their ability to manoeuvre. All other vessels are requested to give this operation a wide berth.

The project vessel will be listening on VHF Channel 16 throughout the project. Further details are included in Marine Notice No 32 of 2017.

Published in News Update
Tagged under
Page 1 of 4

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating