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Displaying items by tag: Kinsale Yacht Club

The Notice of Race has been published for the Squib South Coast Championships taking place on 17 & 18 July at Kinsale Yacht Club.

With a return to racing expected for 7th June, Kinsale hopes to attract entries from Glandore to Killyleagh and all the Irish Squib fleets in between. 

Racing will take place in the waters outside Kinsale Harbour between the Old Head and the Sovereign Islands.

Competition, say organisers, is expected to be 'extremely high' as the Irish National Championships are scheduled just three weeks later in Killyleagh Yacht Club in Northern Ireland.

Entries will be accepted up until 12th July 2021.

Download the NOR and entry form below.

Published in Squib
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Kinsale Yacht Club has confirmed its O'Leary Insurance Group Sovereign's Cup from 23rd to 26th June 2021.

"Having considered the recent announcement on the easing of government restrictions and after consulting all stakeholders, we have agreed that we can hold our reduced size Sovereign's Cup", said Regatta director Anthony O'Neill.

"We believe that there is a pent-up demand among all sailors to get back racing and that this year's event, albeit a more 'on the water' regatta, will cater very well for that demand".

Anthony O'Neill, Sovereigns Cup Regatta Director Anthony O'Neill, Sovereigns Cup Regatta Director

"We are very happy to be in the position that our early decision to plan for a smaller event with a target of 50 boats has now been proven to have been a prudent one. While the government announcement last Friday has effectively given the 'green-light' to sailing in controlled situations, there still remains many uncertainties and challenges for event organisers. Not least among those are restrictions and measures that may be required ashore", O'Neill said. 

"All of us at Kinsale Yacht Club are working hard to provide the best possible racing in June"

For that reason, a final decision on the level of social activity in Kinsale Yacht Club will not be made until closer to the event.

"We will be guided at that time by the guidelines in place with regards to numbers allowed at Events and Social Gatherings" he added.

"If the expected clarifications/alterations to the guidelines do not allow for the use of our Club facilities, then we are confident that participant's needs can be accommodated at the outdoor facilities of the Restaurants, Cafes and Bars in the town".

In addition, all Hotels and Guesthouses will have indoor dining available for those participants who are residents.

"All of us at Kinsale Yacht Club are working hard to provide the best possible racing in June", ONeill concluded.

Published in Sovereign's Cup

There was good news from Kinsale this week as a yacht club member, Stephen McCarthy and his construction company Astra Construction have become the Gold sponsor to back the yacht clubs' hosting of the Dragon Gold Cup in 2024.

After the disappointment of having to cancel the 2020 event, Kinsale has been rewarded with the hosting of the 2024 edition, an exceptionally prestigious event that has in the past attracted royalty and Olympic winners.

Speaking of the sponsorship Stephen McCarthy, himself a keen sailor and father to offshore supremo Cian McCarthy, wanted to support Kinsale Yacht Club, and the Gold Cup was the perfect match for him.

Stephen commented, "Astra Construction are delighted to be on board for the 2024 Dragon Gold Cup. Although we are the title sponsor, our primary aim is to promote our wonderful Yacht Club and have the event called the Kinsale Yacht Club Gold Cup 2024. I am excited to be involved so early in the cycle and look forward to working with the organisers to ensure a truly memorable and successful event."

Michael Walsh Commodore of Kinsale Yacht Club welcomed the announcement by adding, "Stephen has been incredibly generous, not only by becoming the Gold sponsor of the event but also offering his time and energy to help in any way with the other volunteers in running the event to the exacting detail required of the Gold Cup Deed of Gift. Kinsale Yacht Club's success is based around its volunteers, and Stephen has absolutely defined what the Yacht Club is all about by not only sponsoring the event but also volunteering to help out."

Daniel Murphy of the 2024 organising committee and current Dragon class captain commented that "Work has already begun here in Kinsale for 2024. We are delighted to welcome Stephen and thank him for his support and faith in us to run a world-class event. The Dragon class in Kinsale is certainly enjoying a rejuvenation at present, with a growing fleet of active and competitive boats and more on the horizon. The attraction to the fleet in Kinsale is the fun and camaraderie within the group and being able to sail in a beautiful venue like Kinsale."

It is fair to say that all in Kinsale Yacht Club already have their eye firmly on running a spectacular event in 2024, the yacht clubs' third time welcoming the Gold Cup to Kinsale.

Published in Kinsale

The latest Marine Notice from the Department of Transport reminds seafarers of the important of passage planning and regular weather forecast checks during voyages.

It comes following the recommendations in the Marine Casualty Investigation Board (MCIB) report into the rescue of five sailors from the yacht Loa Zour amid severe storm conditions off the Spanish coast in June 2019.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, a crew from Kinsale Yacht Club were rescued from the 40ft yacht on 6 June 2019 just days after they had set out from West Cork for the Spanish port of A Coruña, after experiencing extreme conditions amid the surprise Storm Miguel.

The MCIB report found that while the storm was “an unusual and unexpected weather event”, and the skipper of the Loa Our “showed good judgement in his decision and actions in broadcasting a Mayday distress VHF transmission and activating the vessel’s EPIRB”, he was also unaware of the details of the Code of Practice for the Safe Operation of Recreational Craft and the requirement to submit a passage plan to a shore-based authority.

“If the basic tenets of the passage plan had been observed in detail with respect to updated weather forecasting during the voyage, observing the limitations of the boat design capability and staying within reach of a safe haven by taking a more circuitous route around the coastline of the Bay of Biscay, then the crew of yacht Loa Zour may have been better prepared before encountering Storm Miguel 85 [nautical miles] north of A Coruña,” the report states.

Marine Notice No 19 of 2021 highlights the relevant advice contained within the Code of Practice and related Marine Notices, and can be downloaded below.

Published in MCIB

West Cork's Kinsale Yacht Club is looking forward to having members who live more than five kilometres from Kinsale visit the club marina to use their boats for family cruises from 12th April.

Club Commodore Mike Walsh says KYC is also looking forward to junior sail training recommencing in pods of not greater than 15 after 26th April.

The Government announced yesterday the phased easing of some Covid-19 restrictions during the month of April as Afloat reported here

Kinsale Yacht Club is planning to host its biennial Sovereign's Cup Regatta from June 23, one of the key regattas of the Irish sailing calendar.

Kinsale Yacht Club Commodore Mike WalshKinsale Yacht Club Commodore Mike Walsh

"We expect to be organising family 'cruises' in company in the vicinity of Kinsale harbour after 26th but we are awaiting clarification from Irish Sailing on whether this is permissible under current guidelines", Walsh told Afloat.

"We understand that IS is lobbying to have competitive racing included with training activities when this aspect is allowed to open up and await eagerly the outcome of these discussions, he added.

The Government says it plans to continue this cautious approach, gradually easing restrictions, while a substantial level of the population is vaccinated during April, May and June, after which, it should be safe to reopen society more widely.

Published in Kinsale
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The number of entries for June's O'Leary Insurance Group Sovereign's Cup exceeded the target of 50 boats over the weekend.

As Afloat reported last month, there was an immediate uptake for the even when entries. The current entry list is available here.

Kinsale's Regatta Director Anthony O'Neill and his organising committee have closed the online entry system until further notice. The Government's Covid-19 Pandemic restrictions and guidelines will now be closely monitored to determine if more boats may be accommodated in the event.

Kinsale Yacht Club says a regatta waiting list has now been set-up and any boat interested should email Anthony O'Neill at [email protected] stating Boat Name, Sail No., Rating, Owners Name and Club.

Kinsale Yacht Club is now operating a waiting list for its June Sovereign's Cup Regatta Photo: Bob BatemanKinsale Yacht Club is now operating a waiting list for its June Sovereign's Cup Regatta Photo: Bob Bateman

KYC say the calibre of boats taking part in June has not been affected by the lower number of entrants necessitated by Covid-19.

Coastal Division

In the Coastal Division, Conor Doyle's Xp50 Freya, the biggest boat in the fleet, along with Tom Roche's Salona 45 Meridian, both from KYC are potential winners.

Ahead of the regatta, Doyle's crew will have honed their boat-handling skills in the Dun Laoghaire to Race earlier in June.

Conor Doyle's Freya from the host clubConor Doyle's Xp50 Freya from the host club Photo: Afloat

Other Sovereign's Cup regatta boats that will also have benefitted from the D2D race will be George Sisk's Xp44 WOW, Denis and Annamarie Murphy's Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo, and the Burke/Lemass/Rigley team's Beneteau First 40 Prima Forte. These bigger boats will be joined by two other smaller boats, also competing in the D2D which are Johnny Treanor's Grand Soleil JustTina and David Riome/Mark Leonard's Valfreya from the host club.

Dublin J109s 

In IRC Zero, Conor Phelan's Ker 37 Jump Juice and Niall Dowling's Ker 40+ Arabella are sure to feature strongly. In IRC 1 the J109's are set to repeat their 2019 'Battle of Kinsale' with Richard Colwell/John Murphy's Outrajeous, Simon Knowles' Indian and the Shanahan Family's Ruth.

Simon Knowles' J109 Indian from Howth Yacht Club will compete in IRC One of the Sovereign's Cup Photo: AfloatSimon Knowles' J109 Indian from Howth Yacht Club will compete in IRC One of the Sovereign's Cup Photo: Afloat

These along with Paul and Deirdre Tingle's X-34 Alpaca will be expected to do well as like the bigger boats in the Coastal Division they are also competing in the D2D race.

Eight Half Tonners will race in the IRC2 division of the 2021 Sovereign's Cup Eight Half Tonners will race in IRC 2 division of the Sovereign's Cup 2021 Photo: Bob Bateman

Eight Half Tonners Sign Up

In IRC 2 no less than eight Half Tonners will be participating. George Radley's Cortegada will be making the trip over to Kinsale from Cobh in Cork Harbour to take on the seven entries from Dublin Bay. Among those will be the 2019 IRC 2 winner Nigel Biggs in Checkmate XVIII and 2019 Irish Half Ton Cup winners Michael Wright and Rick DeNeve in Mata.

Nigel Biggs in Checkmate XVIIINigel Biggs in Checkmate XVIII

White Sails

The White Sail Divisions will be book-ended by KYC's James Matthews' new acquisition Fiscala, a Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 49, and the biggest boat in White Sail.

In White Sail IRC2, will be the smallest boat Shillelagh, a Blazer 23 owned by Kinsale Yacht Club Ex-Commodore and former Sovereign's Cup winner John Twomey.

All in all, there should be intriguing racing in the battles not just for the individual class titles but for The Sovereign's Cup, the Portcullis Trophy and the Michelle Dunn Prix d'Elegance Trophy which are the perpetual trophies awarded for the best overall performing boat in IRC, the best overall performance in Echo and the best-presented boat at the event.

Published in Sovereign's Cup

Registration is now open for the 2021 O'Leary Insurance Group Sovereigns Cup which will take place 23rd to 26th June in Kinsale Yacht Club, click here to enter online.

Participants will sail in Classes 0, 1, 2, Coastal and White Sail under PRO Jack Roy and RO Peter Crowley.

Due to the uncertainty around Covid-19 the event will be limited to 50 boats as outlined by Anthony O'Neill, Regatta Director. "Our reason for making this revision to our plans for the event is driven by the potential uncertainty of the Covid-19 pandemic and the restrictions that may be required at different times during 2021. We are taking the prudent approach that will allow maximum flexibility to proceed with the event given the capacity of our clubhouse and marina."

With a limit of 50 boats, early entry is essential.

If KYC have no option but to cancel the event all competitors will be refunded their entry fees in full.

Published in Sovereign's Cup
22nd December 2020

Kinsale & Christmas Go Together

There are only a few harbours in Ireland where you get the feeling that the land is effortlessly embracing the sea rather than endlessly battling it, but Kinsale is undoubtedly one of them.

The picturesque port town provides a gentle interaction which is emphasised at Christmas, when the long nights bring the opportunity for the festive lights afloat and ashore to blend with one another in a maritime display of faith, hope and love.

Boats at Kinsale marina are lit up for Christmas 2020 Boats at Kinsale marina are lit up for Christmas 2020. Photo by KYC Commodore Mike Walsh

Published in Kinsale
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The details of a revised plan for the O'Leary Insurance Group Sovereign's Cup 2021 have been published by Kinsale Yacht Club together with a Notice of Race (NOR).

The Notice of Race is downloadable below as a PDF document (2mb)

Sovereign's Cup Regatta Director Anthony O'Neill has outlined how plans for the event, which is to take place from 23rd to 26th June 2021, have been revised and the reasons for doing so.

"We are all only too aware of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and the restrictions necessary to curtail the spread of infection. We also know that this has led to the cancellation of many planned events this year. Given the potential uncertainty of the Covid-19 pandemic and the restrictions that may be required at the time of this event, the target number of entries will be 50 boats".

This total number of boats may, at the discretion of the Organising Authority (KYC), be increased in order to have a reasonable number of boats in each division and at the same time remain compliant with Covid-19 guidelines in effect at the time of the event. It is intended that boats will be participating in IRC Classes 0, 1, 2, Coastal and White-sail.

Our reason for making this revision to our plans for the event is driven by the potential uncertainty of the Covid-19 pandemic and the restrictions that may be required at different times during 2021. We are taking the prudent approach that will allow maximum flexibility to proceed with the event given the capacity of our clubhouse and marina.

In addition, our clubhouse may be restricted to booked table service only for food and beverages. Given that our marina is in the town we are confident that the local hotels, restaurants and bars will cater for the participants not accommodated in our clubhouse.

If the prevailing Covid-19 restrictions next June are such that we have no option but to cancel the event all competitors will be refunded their entry fees in full.

Registration opens on January 5th here

Listen to Sovereign's Cup Regatta Director Anthony O'Neill's July podcast with Tom MacSweeney here

Published in Sovereign's Cup

Tralee Bay Sailing Club's Paddy Cunnane leads an 11-strong Standard division at a 60-boat Munster Laser Championships in Kinsale Yacht Club

The Kerry solo sailor leads Royal Cork Yacht Club Master Nick Walsh by dint of his victory in the last race of four sailed yesterday. 

Walsh's clubmate Edward Rice, another Master sailor, lies third.

Significantly, the KYC event, under Race Officer John Stallard, sailed enough races on the first day to constitute a championship in case today's big wind forecast cancels the championships.

The Laser sailors gather for the KYC briefing ahead of the Munster Championships Photo: Bob BatemanThe Laser sailors gather for the KYC briefing ahead of the Munster Championships Photo: Bob Bateman

4.7s

In the 4.7 division, youth James Dwyer tops the leaderboard on three points, the former Optimist ace is the first of nine Royal Cork Yacht Club boats that dominate the 26-boat fleet. Second is Harry Twomey on 6 points with Justin Lucas third on ten points.

Radials

The host club's Micheal O'Suilleabhain on three points leads the Radials by four points from RCYC's Michael Crosbie. Jonathan O'Shaughnessy lies third on nine points. 

As Afloat reported earlier, the dinghy class proceeded with its County Cork Championship on a restricted basis and asked Dublin and Donegal sailors, currently under Level 3 Covid partial lockdown, not to attend.

Results are here

Bob Bateman's Laser Munsters Photo Slideshow

Published in Laser
Tagged under
Page 3 of 20

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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