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Displaying items by tag: Kinsale Yacht Club

The Kinsale Yacht Club March League has been postponed on the South Coast.

"Due to the Covid19 crisis Kinsale Yacht Club Management Committee has taken the decision to postpone the league", KYC Commodore Mike Walsh told Afloat.

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With March upon us, the boatyard in Kinsale is a hive of activity ahead of Kinsale Yacht Club’s cruiser racing season.

Polish and antifouling are being applied with some of the more eager and organised expected to be on the start line for the Frank Godsell March League as a warm-up to the Axiom Private Spring Series.

Last week, as Afloat reported previously, the club's Sailing Secretary David Cullinane released the Notice of Race for the Axiom Private Spring Series and is expecting a strong entry.

With new class captains recently elected, former Commodore Finbarr O’Regan takes charge of the Cruisers with Mark Leonard looking after the white sail, meaning Kinsale’s cruiser racing is in safe hands for the season ahead.

Download the PDF below

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Former Club Commodore, Tom Roche of Axiom Private Clients has come on board as title sponsors for this year’s Spring Series at Kinsale Yacht Club writes Brian Goggin.

Tom and his wife Ursula have campaigned their Solona 45 - Meridian for many years now and have been big supporters of cruiser racing along the South Coast

Meridian will once again have strong competition in class Zero from Conor Doyle’s XP 50 Freya as well as visitors from Royal Cork, Conor Phelan’s Jump Juice and Denis Murphy’s Nieulargo.

Commenting on the announcement Michael Walsh Commodore of Kinsale Yacht Club said “we are always so thankful to our sponsors and volunteers within Kinsale Yacht Club and we are very grateful to Tom and Axiom Private Clients who have come onboard as sponsors. The Spring Series is always a fantastic way for our cruiser racers to hone their skills and crew work for their busy season ahead”

And 2020 will certainly be a busy season for Tom Roche and crew as Tom has organised a crew from Kinsale to travel to Malta where they have chartered a new X Yacht to take part in this year’s Middle Sea Race.

This year’s Spring Series will run from 5th to the 25th of April under the stewardship of recently retired Commodore David O’Sullivan as Principle Race Officer.

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Westerly winds of 16 to 20 knots greeted the first day of the Custom Rigging Spring Frostbites Series at Kinsale Yacht Club on Sunday. 

Squibs, Toppers and Lasers competed over a course set by the race officer team of John and Valerie Stallard, Susan Horgan, Bruce and June Matthews. 

Conditions were very gusty so it was decided to run a single race only before the fleet was sent ashore.

Bob Bateman captured the action (below) in the morning race.

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A big celebration evening took place at Kinsale Yacht Club on Thursday night last to mark Kinsale’s win at the recent Bank of Ireland National Enterprise Town Awards writes Brian Goggin of KYC.

Kinsale took home the National title for the most Enterprising Town in Ireland. This is a fantastic achievement for the progressive, forward-thinking town that seems to keep on pushing boundaries and never stops developing.

Of course, Kinsale Yacht Club is a proud share in the town’s success and the yacht club, with its stunning location on the waterfront, was selected as the location to celebrate the towns win.

Mike Walsh, the current Commodore of Kinsale Yacht Club, together with former mirror ace Ciaran Fitzgerald and Dragon sailor David Good is also involved in Kinsale Chamber of Tourism and Business and were heavily involved in the bid for the award along with many other businesses and voluntary organisations in the town

Mike welcomed the gathering to the yacht club before passing proceedings onto Minister Jim Daly who said: “Kinsale Town is a natural leader when it comes to fostering Enterprise. Geography and History have both been very kind to Kinsale, but it is the homegrown, cross-community, can-do approach that has resulted in Kinsale rightly being recognised as a leading Enterprise town in Ireland”.

Eilis Mannion, Head of Bank of Ireland for County Cork officially presented the award to Kinsale. Commenting on Kinsale's win she said, "We saw what happens when a team comes together and collaborates right across the whole community". The win is indicative of the hard work and dedication of many businesses and enterprises but also of the community spirit which is at the heart of everything in Kinsale.

The yacht club look forward to further working with the town with big events like the Squib Nationals and Dragon Gold Cup on the horizon for 2020

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Even by Australia’s sometimes weird boat-naming standards, calling your pride-and-joy Secret Men’s Business is a bit off the wall. Yet there is such a boat – in fact there are two, the second one being a TP52. But the first, usually known as SMB 1, is a Murray 42, built in 1996 but completely re-conditioned for 2019-2020. And during the current busy offshore season in Australia, on the bow is Stephanie Lyons, who started her sailing in Kinsale.

Her home was in Kildare, but childhood summers in Kinsale provided the sailing bug, while a taste for offshore experience was whetted by voyages on the brigantine Asgard II with Captain Colm Newport. Aboard Ireland’s sail training ship, she became not only a Watch Leader several times, but was “Watch Leader of the Year” in 2002.

smb one2A superb restoration. The re-vamped Murray 42 Secret Men’s Business 1 in showroom condition - despite being a 1996 boat - as she heads into the current Australian offshore season

rshr19 pre start3Raring to go – Christmas 2019 in Sydney sees Steph ready with Secret Men’s Business 1 for the annual race to Hobart

After school in Dublin, she did commerce and German in University College Cork, and qualified as an accountant, working in Dublin and doing some sailing until in 2010 she re-located to Australia, where she has become established with fund organisation EISS Super as Chief Risk Officer.

She’d resumed sailing, notably with that renowned Sydney Harbour institution, the Balmain Sailing Club, and was soon involved with the hyper-competitive Sydney 38 Class (another Murray Burns & Dovell design), sailing mostly with Larki Missiris on Wild One, which was going so well that in 2017 and 2018, Wild One took the Rolex CYCA Trophy.

sydney 38 wild one4 Sydney 38 Wild One going sweetlywild one prize5When Wild One wins a prize, it is bow-woman Steph Lyons who is nominated to take the honours
But the Missiris crew – like many other Sydney 38 teams – prefer the class’s intensive semi-inshore annual season-long series to the time-consuming offshore campaigns which have the Rolex Sydney Hobart Race as their peak. So for an opportunity in 2016’s race to Hobart, Steph transferred to the First 47.7 Chancellor, and in the current season, she has fitted in time for offshore commitment at the sharp end of Secret Men’s Business 1.

In the hatchet job which is the way the RSHR results pan out in the end-of-race Derwent Driftathon, SMB 1 was plumb in the middle of a cohort which fell on the wrong side of the results. But they managed a respectable result nevertheless, with more boats astern than ahead. And the Australian offshore season 2019-2020 continues for a while yet, with further campaigns for Steph both with SMB 1 and back with the Sydney 38s, this time on the bow in Thirlmere.

steph wild oats6Busy day at the office….Steph Lyons as a corporate guest aboard the famous Wild Oats XI
She certainly packs a lot into her sailing, as recent experiences have included sailing on the famous Supermaxi Wld Oats XI through a corporate event. But meanwhile, she and fellow women members of the Balmain club have been putting together a campaign team to take part in the Tricentenary Volvo Cork Week in July, sailing the chartered First 36.7 Altair.

The word is that there’ll be just one man in the Altair team. They had to find somebody to make the coffee……..

Published in Kinsale
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With the Kinsale Yacht Club commodore baton being passed from David O’Sullivan to Michael Walsh in December last year, the new commodore is rallying his troops for a busy year ahead, writes the club’s Brian Goggin.

One busy committee member will surely be Matthias Hellstern, who moves into the vice commodore position with responsibility for sailing.

And there is certainly plenty of sailing this season in Kinsale despite it not being a Sovereign’s Cup year.

The hardy sailors will test the waters next month for the custom rigging Frostbites, with the cruisers getting dusted down and going racing in March for the Frank Godsell League.

April brings the highly competitive Cruiser Spring Series and will also see the Dragons launch, somewhat earlier than normal, with a training weekend planned with international sailor and coach Martin Payne.

May sees the Barry Ryan Keelboat Regatta for Dragons and Squibs, numerous club trophy races and the competitive national events will truly kick off with the Optimist Munsters.

The Toppers and Triangle Race visit in June, a month which will also see one of the biggest events in Kinsale this summer with the Squib (British) Nationals. Eyes will firmly be on local Squibbers Colm Dunne and Ian Travers to see if they can maintain their 2019 form and cause an upset against the other top English and Irish teams.

July sees the juniors take over with sailing courses and it also looks to be an incredibly intensive year for some of Kinsale’s brightest talent

July sees the juniors take over with sailing courses and it also looks to be an incredibly intensive year both nationally and internationally for some of Kinsale’s brightest talent so be sure to watch out for names such as Michéal O’Sullivan, Dorothy Matthews and Francesca Lewis.

July also means Cork Week and the Kinsale cruisers and Dragons will make the short trip over to our friends in the Royal Cork to help celebrate their 300-year anniversary.

August will see many cruisers head west for Calves Week, numerous club trophies and of course Kinsale Regatta. The Dragons will also get getting ready for the Gold Cup with a warmup event on the last weekend of August.

Of course, Kinsale is well respected for its sailability class and the club can look back proudly at the incredibly successful and enjoyable inclusion games run last year.

Under the watchful eye of Donal Hickey, this class continues to go from strength to strength and Kinsale will send upwards of 30 sailors to the President’s Cup and Hansa Nationals in Carrigfergus in August, as well as a busy local schedule of events and weekend sailing. Donal is also busily fundraising for additional boats due to the demand of more sailors looking to join the fun.

The ‘big one’ lands in September with the Dragon Gold Cup and over 70 boats are expected to join the strong South Coast contingent

The ‘big one’ lands in September with the Dragon Gold Cup and over 70 boats are expected to join the strong South Coast contingent.

This event was awarded to Kinsale on the back of the successful 2012 event and already event director Tony Kingston reports that entries have been received from Switzerland, Portugal, Spain, UK and Belgium, with lots more expected over the coming months.

The home club expect to have eight Kinsale boats competing and should certainly be represented at the sharp end of the fleet with Cameron Good and crew on Little Fella among the ones to watch.

September is also the month for the always popular at-home regatta, while October to December will see local leagues and club trophies return. The season wraps up on St Stephen’s Day with the popular Gunsmoke Bell, sponsored by the evergreen Sammy Cohen, a man who can be credited with showing many of Kinsale’s finest sailors the ropes and the joys of yacht racing

Of course, Kinsale is a club that is dependent on its volunteers and Dave Cullinane, sailing secretary and winner of the club person of the year, will be totally reliant on volunteers to run all of the events — something for which Kinsale is tremendously grateful and proud of its members and sponsors.

Published in Kinsale

Kinsale Yacht Club has elected Mike Walsh as Commodore. Walsh, a former director of KYC's biennial Sovereign's Cup takes over the helm from outgoing flag officer Dave Sullivan. 

In a big year on the water for Kinsale, the West Cork club will stage the Squib National Championships in June and the Dragon Gold Cup in September. Read Afloat's preview here

KYC's new Vice Commodore is Matthias Hellstern.  The Rear Commodore (House) is Susan Horgan. Rear Commodore (Marina) is Anthony Scannell and Rear Commodore (Membership) is Maeve Cotter.

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Six sailing cruisers raced for the Gunsmoke Bell on St.Stephen’s Day at Kinsale Yacht Club in the annual event sponsored by Sam Cohen.

The winner was Stephen Lysaght’s Reavra Too, with Michael Carroll’s Chancer second and Sam Cohen himself sailing Gunsmoke II into third place.

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Kinsale Yacht Club’s October Whitesail series concluded with three yachts in a tie for the top places in the ECHO fleet writes Tom MacSweeney

Valfreya (Leonard/Riome), Justus (Dan Buckley) and Godot (John Godkin) all finished on 11 points. After one discard was allowed over the five-race series, when the tie-breaker was brought into play, the Sigma 33 Valfreya, got first place with the J/109 Justus second and the Dufour 44/Godot third.

There was also a tie in the IRC fleet but here John Godkin’s Godot was the clear winner on 6 points overall. The tie was between Dan Buckley’s Justus and the Carroll Brother’s Elan, Chancer, both finishing on 8 points. It favoured Justus which got second place with Elan third.

 DSC9352J109 Justus Photo: Bob Bateman

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Page 8 of 22

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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