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Displaying items by tag: Newbuild

Work on the new Isle of Man Steam Packet Company's flagship ferry, Manxman, is on schedule.

As previously reported on Afloat, the vessel is under construction in a South Korean shipyard and is due to be ready by 2023.

Managing Director Brian Thomson says images of the ferry in its current state will soon be made available.

ManxRadio also has a podcast with the M.D. discussing further details on the newbuild which is to replace Ben-My-Chree on the Douglas-Heysham route.

 

Published in Ferry

The General Lighthouse Authority (GLA) for Scotland and the Isle of Man, the Northern Lighthouse Board (NLB) has embarked on a project to replace the NLV Pole Star after more than two decades in service.

NLV Pole Star is nearing an end of a career with a newbuild target in-service date of September 2024. This will see the replacement aids to navigation tender meet the ambitious environmental targets set out in the UK Government Clean Maritime Plan, whilst future-proofing NLB’s ability to deliver its vital safety services over the next 25 years.

The new vessel will incorporate contemporary green hybrid energy systems and will be designed to be upgradeable through-life to accommodate emerging power technologies.  The vessel will also provide improved sea keeping and heavy weather performance over its predecessor and therefore be able to deliver more effective response to wrecks and new navigational dangers as well as routine operational tasking.

A concept design has been developed in collaboration with OSK-ShipTech of Copenhagen who assisted the project team, which includes ship and shore staff, NLB Commissioners and Caledonian Maritime Assets Ltd (CMAL). This concept design and detailed specification is being used to inform both the business case and procurement exercise.

Mike Bullock, NLB’s Chief Executive said: “This is a very exciting project and we are delighted to have recently received Ministerial and Cabinet Office approval of the Outline Business Case (OBC). This means we can now progress to the procurement phase for the design and build of the new vessel.

“The new vessel will be a step change from what has gone before bringing innovation and new technology to minimise the impact on the environment and ensure that we can continue to protect mariners operating in Scottish and Manx waters. The vessel will also follow a tradition which started in 1892 by being the fifth NLB vessel to bear the name Pole Star.”

The procurement exercise began on 19 May 2021 with the publication of the initial call for interested shipyard builders to respond to a Selection Questionnaire. Subsequently, short listed yards will enter into a detailed tendering exercise which will lead to contract award in mid-2022.

In April, information from NLB’s Industry Engagement events was held and can be found on the NLB website and via the following Industry Event portal here. 

This opportunity has been published on Delta eSourcing which is a tool for buyers and suppliers for managing tenders. Interested tenderers must register on the Delta Platform to access key documents and to take part in this procurement activity, click this link.

Published in Lighthouses

A new bulk oriented general cargoship for Arklow Shipping took to the water for the first time yesterday as the fifth of six ships was launched by shipbuilder Ferus Smit, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 8,543dwt newbuild (NB.441) bulker was christened in The Netherlands as Arklow Arrow and launched onto the Ems Canal, however due to Covid-19 restrictions the inland shipyard was not open to public.

Ferus Smit is a German shipbuilder that has a second yard located in Westerbroek from where the Arklow A- series 'Arrow' became the first ship to use this name in the ASL fleet.

Arklow Arrow's design is a slightly modified version of the first series of 8,600dwt bulkers of the Arklow B-series also completed by Ferus Smit.

The new design also has an adapted ice class 1A along with a modified bow form and propulsion with a propeller nozzle added. As for the main engine, output has been decreased to 2000kW so to enbable better fuel efficiency.

Following sea trials that will take place in the North Sea, see Arklow Archer' canal transit (following launch in June) the Arrow will join the other A-series ships; Ace, Accord and Abbey which was delivered last year as the leadship.

Likewise of this series the new cargoship is registered at its shipowners Co. Wicklow homeport and will fly the Irish tricolor.

Total hold capacity is 350.000cft and this will see Arklow Arrow be mainly employed in the shipment of corn, wheat and other bulk commodities in European waters.

Published in Ports & Shipping

The intention to purchase a new Multi Role Vessel (MRV) for the Naval Service has been confirmed by the Department of Defence.

This could see the vessel be used as a hospital ship and capable of carrying troops and helicopters for amphibious in addition airborne landings.

A spokeswoman for the department said planning is "underway on this project".

It is envisaged that the MRV (as Afloat reported in 2018) will replace the ageing LÉ Eithne as the Naval Service flagship, and could cost up to €200m.

The new ship is likely to be designed to allow it the capability to carry out numerous different types of missions, not just sea fishery patrols.

Military sources have indicated that it could be used to provide humanitarian aid in times of emergency in Ireland and in other countries where conflicts or climate disaster threaten civilian populations.

It could also be used by gardaí, customs, or the coastguard, where required.

The MRV project is being managed by a civil-military project team and work is ongoing on preparing detailed specification requirements for the ship.

For further reading the Irish Examiner reports.

Published in Navy

Ferry operator Aran Island Ferries has announced it’s on track to make history this summer – by commissioning Ireland’s largest domestic ferry.

The boat, reports GalwayBayFM, will be a 40 metre vessel with space for 400 passengers, which represents a significant boost in capacity over it’s current largest boats, Music of the Sea and Magic of the Sea.

The new vessel will be the sixth boat in the Aran Island Ferries fleet – though full details or a name for the vessel have yet to be revealed.

Afloat.ie adds as for the names of the larger ferries this is in fact their English translation. The names of these vessels are in Irish, Ceol na Farraige (built 2001) and Draíocht na Farraige (1999) respectively.

Each of the 37m Wavemaster monohull craft can carry 294 passengers. 

Published in Ferry

The fourth and final 'W' series of newbuilds for Arklow Shipping was launched earlier this month, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Arklow Wood was successfully launched at the Ferus Smit's shipyard in Leer, Germany.

As Afloat reported a previous sister Arklow Willow was launched last year though the 'Wind' is the first to be used in the owners naming scheme for this series.

The Arklow Wood took to the waters on 3rd April and will fly the Irish flag. As for design the cargoship is an enlarged version of the 8500dwt ships that the shipyard delivered to Arklow Shipping in the past.  The cargoship in comparison with these predecessors has almost twice the carrying capacity of 16,500dwt.

As for propulsion the newbuild is equipped with a 3840kW main engine in order to achieve low fuel consumption.

The design features:
– Main dimensions (Loa X B X T) 149.50 X 19.25 X 8.59 mtr.
– 16500 DWT, 700.000 cft hold volume.
– Iceclass 1A with 3840kW main engine.
– 2 box shaped holds.
– Propeller equipped with a duct for enhanced thrust at lower speeds and reduction of maximum installed propulsion power.

A previous 'W' series of a different design and all since disposed had been the first newbuilds for ASL to be ordered from a shipyard outside Europe, having been built in South Korea. This series however only totalled a trio and all using the same ship names now applied to the new series comprising of leadship Arklow Wave, Wind and Willow.

Another recent newbuild, Arklow Ace launched last month and belonging to the 'A'  series was also built by the same German group but at their Ferus Smit yard at Westerbroek, The Netherlands. The newbuild has recently left the inland yard under the Irish flag. 

The fleet of ASL including its Dutch division totals almost 60 dry-cargo vessels among them deep-sea bulk-carriers. 

Published in Ports & Shipping

The latest and third newbuild of the Arklow 'A' class series which is a bulk orientated general cargoship was launched at a Dutch yard, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Arklow Ace (Nb.439) took to the water for the first time as the third of six such ships so far from the Ferus Smit yard at Westerbroek on Friday.

Arklow Ace was christened for owners Arklow Shipping and at the stern the Co. Wicklow town is given as the port of registry. When the newbuild enters service this Irish flagged vessel will expand the fleet to 57 dry-cargo ships including 17 that are Dutch flagged.

Not only is Arklow Ace a new ship but is a first for ASL having this particular 'A' name suffix along with the previously completed sister, Arklow Accord (launched in November). The first of the series, leadship Arklow Abbey (in July) is an exception as the same name was previously used in a vessel dating to 1981 and sold in 1996.

The design of the A series is a slightly modified version of the first series of the 8600dwt bulkers that Ferus Smit built under the name of the Arklow B series.

A modified bow form and hull is adapted for Iceclass 1A conditions. As for propulsion this sees a propeller nozzle added while the main engine output was decreased to 2000 kW for better fuel efficiency.

This ship has the following characteristics:
– Loa = 119.495 mtr
– Lpp = 116.895 mtr
– B = 14.99 mtr
– D = 9.70 mtr
– T max = 7.160 mtr
– Hold volume = 350.000 cft

When Arklow Ace is delivered into service, the newbuild will be primary employed in typical shipments such as wheat, corn and other bulk commodities throughout European waters.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Arklow Accord is the latest of a new series for ship-owner Arklow Shipping Ltd, however the bulk oriented cargo vessel is also a first for the company to use this ship name, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The launching of newbuild Arklow Accord (Nb. 438) which took place on Friday, represents the second of a six ships using the Arklow 'A' naming scheme. The order by ASL is with shipbuilder Ferus Smit at their Dutch shipyard located in Westerbroek. 

Currently the company have almost 60 vessels including Dutch division Arklow Shipping Nederland B.V. and this milestone is to be exceeded with the roll-out of the Arklow A - series. 

The design of Arklow Accord will see its operations chiefly employed in the shipment of corn, wheat and other bulk commodities in European waters.

The inland yard at Westerbroek, is where Irish flagged leadship Arklow Abbey was also given the customary launched sideways in July and with the newbuild entering service two months later.

According to Ferus Smit, the design is a slightly modified version of the first series of 8600dwt bulkers that the shipyard built under the Arklow B – series. The new design is adapted for iceclass 1A, with modified bow form and propulsion with a propeller nozzle added.

At the same time, the main engine output was decreased to 2000 kW for better fuel efficiency.

Listed below are the basic characteristics of Arklow Accord:
– Loa = 119.495 mtr
– Lpp = 116.895 mtr
– B = 14.99 mtr
– D = 9.70 mtr
– T max = 7.160 mtr
– Hold volume = 350.000 cft

The delivery of the Arklow registered newbuild is due for January 2020.

Published in Ports & Shipping

To those in Cork City this weekend and travelling down J.J. Horgan's Quay may have noticed a sleek new naval arrival making its way upriver to the quay.

According to CorkBeo, the shiny arrival is a new French Naval ship, Rhône. It was only launched this year, so get down to see this while you can!

The newbuild is a support vessel of the French Navy which entered service this year and as Afloat reported in the summer Rhône made a first visit to Ireland. On that occasion it was to the Port of Waterford.

For more on this current call to Cork, click here, before the naval visitor departs the city on Monday morning.

Published in Naval Visits

Scot Explorer became the latest launch for a UK shipping forests products operator, following a christening ceremony that was held at a Dutch shipyard yesterday, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The launch (footage) of newbuild (NB 747) at the Royal Bodewes yard in Hoogezand marked the second of a three-ship order confirmed from Scotline which has its headquarters based in Romford, Kent.

Unlike leadship Scot Carrier launched last year, the latest newbuild of the trio of 4,800dwt sisters, differs having enclosed bridge wings, in order to make manoeuvring easier. The newbuild is due to be completed next month.

As for the final timber products carrier, this newbuild to be named Scot Ranger is scheduled to be delivered at the end of 2020.

Scotline primarily runs liner services throughout northern Europe with regular routes between Sweden, Ireland, Denmark, Germany, Norway and the Baltic States. In addition to those serving the UK, Netherlands and France.

Published in Ports & Shipping
Page 1 of 2

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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