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Displaying items by tag: RNLI

Valentia Coast Guard requested Lough Derg RNLI lifeboat to launch to assist a lone skipper on a 25ft yacht aground at Ryan’s Point on the eastern shore of Lough Derg on Sunday at 4.47 pm.

The wind was westerly, Force 2/3. Visibility was good.

At 5.06 pm Lough Derg RNLI lifeboat Jean Spier launched with helm Keith Brennan, Steve Smyth, Joe O’Donoghue and Richard Nolan on board. At 5.14 pm the lifeboat had the casualty vessel in sight; it was located at Ryan’s Point, broadside to weather.

Taking a tow line with him, an RNLI volunteer swam back to the casualty vessel whilst the lifeboat stood by in safe water. The skipper was found to be safe and unharmed and wearing his lifejacket. He had been motoring-sailing when his engine failed. The skipper had dropped anchor, but it dragged, and his yacht had drifted into the rocky shore. As the yacht was not hard aground, an RNLI volunteer was able to ease the vessel into safe water and then receive a tow line from the lifeboat.

At 5.40 pm the lifeboat took the casualty under tow and at 6.59 pm, as the lifeboat approached Dromineer Harbour, the lifeboat changed to an alongside tow. At 7.12 pm the casualty vessel was safely tied alongside in Dromineer Harbour.

The lifeboat departed the scene and was back at Station at 7.20 pm and at 7.40 pm the lifeboat was washed down and refuelled.

Christine O’Malley, Lifeboat Operations Manager at Lough Derg RNLI, advises boat users ‘as the boating season starts in earnest, remember to have your engine serviced and if you are alone on the water, tell someone your plans and what time you expect to arrive at your destination.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Calls have been made for greater public awareness over the risks of incoming tides after three people were rescued off Sandymount earlier this week.

A multi-agency response involving Dun Laoghaire RNLI and the Irish Coast Guard’s Dublin-based helicopter Rescue 116 led to the casualties’ successful retrieval after they became stranded on a sandbank on Tuesday (26 April).

Speaking to Independent.ie, a local councillor called for a major advertising campaign to highlight the dangers of tides at Sandymount, which has become notorious for such incidents.

“This happens far too often and the Coast Guard use a huge amount of resources every year to rescue people who find themselves in this situation,” Fine Gael’s Cllr James Geoghegan said. Independent.ie has more on the story HERE.

The news comes in the same week as a joint appeal from the coastguard, RNLI and Water Safety Ireland to take care when on or near the water this May Bank Holiday weekend, as reported earlier on Afloat.ie.

Published in Water Safety

In the lead up to the May bank holiday weekend, the Coast Guard, RNLI and Water Safety Ireland have issued a joint water safety appeal, asking people to take some basic steps to stay safe, as incidents continue to occur as the weather improves and more people visit waterways nationwide or participate in coastal and inland aquatic activities.

There has been a seasonable increase in the overall number of search and rescue incidents with activity levels similar to recent years. The three organisations are drawing particular attention to the need for people involved in sea kayaking and similar activities, to receive proper training before going on the water, to carry a reliable means of calling for help and to tell someone where you are going and what time you will be back.

Water temperatures remain cold even at this time of year and Cold Water Shock can affect everyone. The three organisations advise everyone intending to take part in any water-based activity or coastal walks to take some basic steps in advance to keep safe.

If heading out on the water or visiting the coast:

  • Always check the weather and tides
  • Carry a reliable means of raising the alarm (i.e. VHF radio or phone)
  • Tell someone where you are going and what time you will be back
  • Wear a suitable Personal Flotation Device on the water
  • Watch out for incoming tides to avoid getting cut off. With High Tides ranging from midday to early evening depending on the part of the coast, it is important that people check before walking along the coast.

If you are swimming:

  • Water temperatures are still cold at this time of the year, consider wearing a wetsuit to stay warm
  • Acclimatise slowly
  • Wear a bright swimming cap and consider a tow float to increase your visibility
  • Never swim alone and always ensure that your activity is being monitored by a colleague

Micheál O’Toole, Irish Coast Guard Operations Manager, said: ‘It is important to have a means of communication if engaging in any water-based activity. When boating, carry a VHF radio, backed up by flares, PLB (Personal Locator Beacon) or EPIRB (Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacon). Never solely rely on a mobile phone.’

He added ‘that prior to undertaking any boat activity please ensure that equipment is fit for purpose and that a shore-based contact is aware of your plans and estimated duration.’

Kevin Rahill, RNLI Water Safety Lead, added: ‘Many people will be taking to the water for the first time this year and this is a good time to think about checking your equipment, especially your lifejacket. We recommend that people get their lifejackets serviced annually. Not everyone intends to end up in the water. If you fall in unexpectedly, remember to ‘Float to Live’ – lie on your back and spread your arms and legs, gently moving them to keep afloat. Keep floating until you feel your breath coming back before calling for help or swimming ashore if nearby.

‘For visitors and people new to our shores, the RNLI has a range of translated safety resources in many languages which are available to download here: https://rnli.org/safety/multi-lingual-resources

Roger Sweeney, Water Safety Ireland’s Acting CEO, cautions: ‘Muscle cooling due to hypothermia is a factor in many drownings. Swim within your depth and keep it short as warm air does not mean warm water, especially in May. Children require close, constant, uninterrupted supervision. When shoreline walking, beware of being stranded by incoming tides. Many recently arrived Ukrainians have never visited a beach and are unfamiliar with such stranding risks. Please help to keep them safe by reaching out in your community with the translated advice at; www.watersafety.ie/ukraine ’

If you see somebody in trouble on the water or along the coast, or think they are in trouble; Dial 112 or use VHF radio CH 16 and ask for the Coast Guard.

Published in Coastguard

Clifden RNLI’s volunteer lifeboat crew joined in a multi-agency response to an incident at Clifden Quay yesterday (Tuesday 26 April) where a casualty was injured in a fall from the quayside onto a boat some 15-20ft below.

Mechanic Joe Acton and crew member Andy Bell were in the area carrying out vessel maintenance and responded to the incident with the RNLI Sillinger boarding boat.

The Sillinger is a light and small boat which is usually used to access the Shannon class all-weather lifeboat but it is very suitable for use in shallow water.

The two crew members manoeuvred the boarding boat into position to allow paramedics to access the casualty and transfer him to the ambulance which was waiting at the quay.

The casualty was subsequently airlifted by the Air Corps helicopter 112 to University Hospital Galway for further treatment.

Clifden RNLI lifeboat operations manager John Brittain said: “This is a great example of multi-agency cooperation between the RNLI, HSE/National Ambulance Service, Clifden Fire Service, An Garda Síochána, the Coast Guard and the Air Corps.

“This call demonstrated great teamwork and decision-making and we all wish the casualty a speedy recovery.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The lifeboat crew at Howth RNLI are joining the circus for one night only to kick start their Mayday campaign to raise funds for the RNLI. Circus Gerbola, which is running at Howth Castle until 2 May is holding a special Gala performance this Friday, 29 April where 50% of the ticket sales will be donated to the RNLI.

The circus will feature a very special guest, Howth RNLI’s very own Ian Sheridan who will be the Circus Ringmaster on the night.

Speaking today, Second Coxswain of Howth Lifeboat (and trainee Ringmaster) Ian Sheridan said: ‘Friday night is going to be one to remember, as the RNLI take you ringside for a night of great family fun and entertainment!

It will be a great start to the May Bank Holiday weekend, and we hope a great start to the RNLI’s Mayday national fundraiser which runs for the entire month of May. Summer is our busiest time of the year, as people who spend more time by the coast and on the water can sometimes get into trouble and need our help. Mayday is our own call for help, as we rely on the generosity of the public to support events like the Circus fundraiser that raise funds to allow us to be there when we’re needed most.

‘We’d like to thank Circus Gerbola for their support of Howth RNLI in holding this special performance. I’m learning my lines and getting ready to entertain – let’s hope the pagers don’t go off mid-performance!’

Jane Murray, Event Producer of Circus Gerbola said: ‘The RNLI is an amazing charity with amazing volunteers who drop everything at a moment’s notice to save lives at sea. While in the beautiful coastal town of Howth, we at Circus Gerbola wanted to use our platform to help fundraise for a local charity – what better than Howth RNLI. The volunteer crew have been such great sports, especially Ian Sheridan who will join us as the Circus Ringmaster at this special gala performance on Friday, for great fun and entertainment, and some surprises thrown in as well!

We are donating 50% of our ticket sales from the show on Friday to Howth RNLI and the RNLI fundraisers will be on site shaking their buckets for any further donations that the public wish to make.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Skerries RNLI were tasked shortly before 11am yesterday morning (Monday 25 April) following a 999 call to Dublin Coast Guard from two kayakers who were stranded on Shenick Island off the North Co Dublin town.

The Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson was quickly launched and the volunteer crew navigated their way around the headland and past Colt and St Patrick’s islands before heading towards Shenick.

After its crew quickly spotted the two men on the foreshore of Shenick island, the lifeboat was carefully manoeuvred into the shallow waters on the western side of the island and two volunteers waded ashore to check on the condition of the casualties.

One of the men had been in the water for some time after his kayak capsized and he lost his paddle. As a result, he was suffering badly from the cold and was beginning to show signs of hypothermia.

The lifeboat helm decided that the best course of action was to get the man ashore and out of the elements as quickly as possible.

He was transferred into the lifeboat by the crew and in order to speed up the evacuation, one member of the crew stayed on the island with the second man, who was feeling fit and well, to assist him in recovering their kayaks from the far side of the island.

The lifeboat brought the casualty to the beach at the lifeboat station, where he was met by shore-crew volunteers who provided him with blankets and brought him into the boathouse.

In the meantime, the lifeboat returned to Shenick Island to pick up the remaining volunteer and the second man. Their kayaks and equipment were also loaded on to the lifeboat and returned to shore.

After spending some time in the station warming up, the man was soon feeling much better and did not require any further medical assistance.

An Irish Defence Forces RIB was also in the area at the time as the Air Corps are currently undergoing exercises in Gormanston. They also made their way to Shenick Island and stood by to offer any assistance if required.

Weather conditions at the time had a Force 3-4 easterly wind with a slight swell and good visibility.

Speaking about the callout, volunteer press officer Gerry Canning said: “The men made the right call in getting themselves ashore wherever they could and calling for help.

“One of the men had his mobile phone in a waterproof case which proved very important in this instance and we continue to encourage people to always carry a means of contacting the shore in case they need assistance.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The King Sitric Seafood Bar raised €35,634 over the past four years for the RNLI as part of the charity’s Fish Supper campaign.

Head of Engagement for the RNLI, Pete Emmett visited Howth to present a plaque and a letter of thanks signed by Mark Dowie, the Chief Executive of the RNLI to the owners of the King Sitric in recognition of their outstanding contribution to the fundraising efforts of the RNLI.

Speaking following the presentation, Pete Emmett said: “I am delighted to be in Howth to visit The King Sitric alongside my colleague Danny Curran and the local fundraising branch of Howth RNLI. It is important to be here today to make this presentation to Joan, Aidan and Dec and thank them personally for the amazing contribution they have made to the RNLI.

The funds raised by supporters like The King Sitric equip our lifeboats with the best kit and train our crews to the highest standards so that they can save lives at sea.”

Joan Mac Manus of The King Sitric said: “The RNLI is such an important part of the community here in Howth and provides an invaluable service to all who take to the sea whether it’s our suppliers catching us the freshest fish, or our customers who enjoy a sail or a swim nearby.

We are delighted to be able to support the Howth RNLI fundraising branch and host such fantastic Lifeboat Dinners at the restaurant. Over fine food, wine and a lively auction, we’ve managed to raise over €35,000 in the past four years. The dinners have been great fun and we look forward to hosting more in the future!”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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To help launch this year’s Mayday Mile fundraiser for the RNLI, a lone kayaker who got into difficulty off Clogherhead in County Louth last month, returned to visit the lifeboat crew who saved his life when he capsized in a strong current and could not get to safety. Kayaker Andrzej Kolobius met with his rescuers at Clogherhead RNLI lifeboat station to say thank you in person and introduce the volunteer crew to his wife Aneta and daughter Nicola.

Last year, lifeboat crews in Ireland launched 1,078 times, bringing 1,485 people to safety, an increase of 30% on the previous year’s lifeboat callouts. With demand for its lifesaving services at a high, the charity is putting out its own ‘Mayday’ call, urging the public to take part in the RNLI’s Mayday Mile, to raise essential funds to provide vital training and equipment to keep their lifesavers safe, while they save others.

Whether you choose to walk, jog, hop or skip, the Mayday Mile challenges people to cover a distance in any way they like between Saturday 1st and Monday 31st May, whilst raising vital funds for RNLI lifesavers so that they can continue to keep people safe at sea.

Experienced kayaker Andrzej Kolobius, a Polish national living in County Monaghan for many years, wanted to come and visit his rescuers with his family, wife Aneta and daughter Nicola (8), to thank them in person after they saved his life last month. An experienced kayaker, Andrzej had no idea when he took to the water that morning that he would need to be rescued. He still has no idea who raised the alarm but is grateful they did and that he was able to be reunited with his family.

Commenting after meeting his rescuers Andrzej said, ‘I can never express how thankful I am to the lifeboat crew that rescued me. Not just for me but for my wife and daughter too. I am that person who never thought they would need to be rescued. I am an experienced kayaker and had my drysuit and lifejacket on, but I had no idea that I would not be able to get back on my kayak. I was close to the headland, but I was getting battered and was exhausted and could only manage to hang on to the kayak and hope help would come. I can never thank my rescuers enough and I’m delighted to be able to help the RNLI launch their Mayday Mile appeal.’

Clogherhead RNLI mechanic and crewmember Barry Sharkey added, ‘This summer we will no doubt see people get into danger on the water while enjoying a day out with their family or friends. Despite what you may think, it’s so easy to get into trouble. It can happen to anyone, as Andrzej has shown. That’s why we’re calling on our supporters to sign up for their own Mayday Mile, to help give us and our fellow lifesavers everything we need to continue to keep people safe this summer and beyond.’

‘Andrzej had all the correct equipment which helped keep him afloat and warm until we arrived. The fast response from the time the Coast Guard raised the alarm to us rescuing him, made the difference. Seeing him with Aneta and Nicola at the station, brings it home to us that behind every rescue is a family. We are so grateful for the support we receive.’

All funds raised through the Mayday Mile will give RNLI lifesavers the training, equipment, and kit that they need to rescue others and come home safe themselves.

The Mayday Mile will be running from Saturday 1 May to Monday 31 May. Sign up and find out more at RNLI.org/SupportMayday

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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From Good Friday (15 April) until the weekend just passed the volunteer crew at Lough Ree RNLI came to the assistance of 17 people who encountered difficulties on and around the lake.

Four of the call-outs were to cruisers which had run aground on shoals and rocks in lower Lough Ree.

On the afternoon of Good Friday, the RNLI lifeboat was tasked to the assistance of a cruiser with five people on board which had run aground at the Hexagon Shoal near Hare Island. On Easter Monday (18 April) just after midday the Irish Coast Guard requested the charity’s volunteer crew to assist a 40ft cruiser with five people on board who had run aground in the same area. Easter Tuesday evening (19 April) just before 9 pm saw the RNLI lifeboat ‘Tara Scougall’ and her crew back north of Hare Island to rescue two people on board a stranded 30ft cruiser.

After inspection, all three vessels were towed to safety at Coosan Point.

On Saturday last (23 April) at 11.35 am under helm Liam Sheringham the Lough Ree RNLI volunteer crew were called to assist a cruiser with four people on board who had run aground north of Yew Point. When the lifeboat reached the scene at Hodson Bay one crew member was put on board the stricken vessel to conduct an examination. Following inspection, the vessel was taken under tow to Coosan Point.

As the Lough Ree RNLI shore crew were on their way to assist the recovered vessel moor at Coosan jetty they were called to assist a member of the public who had taken a fall in the Coosan Point amenity area. The casualty recovered following first aid treatment by the volunteer shore crew at the scene and follow-up care at the lifeboat station.

In recent days the Lough Ree RNLI lifeboat crew has been engaged in recovery and towing training, the charity’s volunteer Operations Manager said: ‘While Lough Ree RNLI is always trained, prepared and ready to respond to any emergency at any time I would encourage those using cruisers on the lake to adhere to all navigation guidelines and be aware of hazards that may lie just beneath to surface of the water.’

Ahead of the May Bank Holiday weekend all who use the lake are encouraged to be mindful of taking all the relevant safety precautions.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The volunteer Union Hall RNLI crew in West Cork were requested to launch their inshore Atlantic 85 lifeboat Christine and Raymond Fielding, by the Irish Coast Guard at 7.56 pm on Sunday 24th April to a 33-foot vessel with two persons on board with engine difficulty.

The lifeboat under helm Chris Collins with crew Paddy Moloney, Sean Walsh and Riona Casey, launched at 8.04 pm, in South East force 4/5 moderate to rough sea conditions at the time, Once on scene, an assessment was carried out by our crew and due to the engine difficulties, a tow was established and the vessel was escorted to the nearest safe port of Union Hall, where the lifeboat was recovered at 11.00 pm.

Following the call out, Peter Deasy, Union Hall RNLI Deputy Launch Authority said: ‘It is always advisable to call the Coast Guard on 112/999 if you see someone in trouble on or near the water, wear a life jacket, carry a means of communication, wear suitable clothing for the trip at sea, and enjoy your time on the coast over the coming months.’ Also we would like to congratulate Riona on her first call-out as a volunteer crew member here in Union Hall.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Page 9 of 264

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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