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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

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Displaying items by tag: Ronan Byrne

#Rowing: Ronan Byrne had to settle for fifth place in the final of the men’s single sculls at the World Under-23 Rowing Championships in Poznan, Poland. The defending champion, Trevor Jones of Canada is just 20 but he managed the race superbly, taking the lead and holding out against challenges from Marc Weber of Germany and Ben Davison of the United States. Behind these, Bulgaria’s Boris Yotov and Byrne fought their own battle through the middle of the race. In the final 200 metres, Davison, in third, caught a crab and left the bronze medal open – but it was the Bulgarian who grabbed it. Davison took fourth ahead of Byrne.

World Under-23 Championships, Poznan, Poland, Day Five (Irish interest):

Men

Lightweight Double Sculls – A Final: 1 Spain 6:16.29, 2 Italy 6:16.66, 3 Germany 6:17.87; 5 Ireland (F McCarthy, J McCarthy) 6:20.42.

Single Sculls – A Final: 1 Canada 6:48.70, 2 Germany 6:50.51, 3 Bulgaria (B Yotov) 6:51.42; 5 Ireland (R Byrne) 6:59.57.

Women

Lightweight Double Sculls – B Final (places 7 to 12): 5 Ireland 7:11.0.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ireland’s Ronan Byrne won his quarter final of the men’s single sculls at the World Under-23 Rowing Championships in Poznan, Poland, taking a place in the A/B Semi-Finals. The UCC man was the clear leader right through, with Russia and Brazil slotting into the other qualification places for the last 12.

 Hugh Sutton finished fifth in his quarter-final of the lightweight single sculls. The top three – Austria, South Africa and Germany – were established early, and Sutton held fifth through the race.

World Under-23 Rowing Championships, Poznan, Poland

Men

Single Sculls – Quarter-Final (First Three to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to C/D Semi-Finals): 1 Ireland (R Byrne) 7:20.26.

Lightweight Single Sculls – Quarter-Final (First Three to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to C/D Semi-Finals): 5 Ireland (H Sutton) 7:55.8.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ireland qualified two more boats at the World Under-23 Rowing Championships in Poznan, Poland.

 Ronan Byrne won his heat of the single sculls. The UCC man led by two seconds after 500 metres and extended his lead through the race – he won by 7.31 seconds from Germany’s Marc Weber. The top four qualified for the quarter-finals.

 The Ireland women’s pair of Emily Hegarty and Tara Hanlon took their place in the semi-finals with a solid third place in their heat. Britain – with ex-Ireland rower Hannah Scott in the stroke seat – took the race on early, but the United States had other ideas. They took over the lead and held it. Ireland won a battle with Spain for the third qualification place.    

 Earlier, the Ireland lightweight pair of David O’Malley and Shane Mulvaney had won their heat.

Under-23 World Championships, Poznan, Poland

Men

Lightweight Pair – Heat Two (Winner to A Final; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (S Mulvaney, D O’Malley) 6:50.92.

Lightweight Quadruple – Heat One (Winner to A Final; rest to Repechage): 1 United States 6:00.18; 3 Ireland (M Taylor, N Beggan, R Ballantine, A Goff) 6:04.62.

Single Sculls – Heat Five (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 Ireland (R Byrne) 7:07.77

Lightweight Single Sculls (First Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to Repechage): 5 Ireland (H Sutton) 7:24.38.

Women

Pair – Heat Three (First Three to A/B Semi-Finals; rest to Repechage): 1 United States 7:30.57, 2 Britain (2 H Scott) 7:35.93, 3 Ireland (E Hegarty, T Hanlon) 7:46.45.  

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The standard was high at the second session of the Ireland Trial at the National Rowing Centre in Cork. Patrick Boomer and Andy Harrington again tested Shane O’Driscoll and Mark O’Donovan in the pair – this time the margin was just 1.3 seconds – and Sanita Puspure came in under seven minutes 40 seconds in another outstanding performance in the single sculls.

There was an all-Skibbereen shootout in the lightweight doubles: twins Jake and Fintan McCarthy, who are just 21, came in just 2.8 seconds behind Paul and Gary O’Donovan.

Margaret Cremen teamed up with Denise Walsh to produce a fast lightweight double, while Monika Dukarsa and Aileen Crowley formed a heavyweight double which also produced a good performance. Aifric Keogh and Emily Hegarty formed a pair which also bettered 90 per cent of projected world best time.

A second configuration of the men’s junior quad did very well, while the women’s junior double from Workmen’s again produced one of the best performances of the day.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The UCD Boat Club centenary dinner was a huge and successful occasion, with 425 attendees. Tom Sullivan (81) was the keynote speaker and gave a summation of the history of the club: not just the good days, such as the 1974 win in the Ladies Plate at Henley Royal Regatta (he was the coach), but also the tough times early on, when one of the mentors, James Meenan, said that “championships were not for the likes of us”.

Sullivan was not the only one who could look back to the middle of the last century and revel in the successes. Michael Cleary (91) rowed in the late 1940s and early 1950s. He received a special award.

Ten other presentations were made to important figures in the history of the club.

UCD Centenary Awards

Liz Cooke, Colm Daly, Johnny Devitt, Martin Feeley, Claire Lambe, David Neale, Murrough O’Brien, Jaye Renehan, Brian Sherry, Tom Sullivan.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ronan Byrne came home fastest of over 200 scullers to win  the Cork Sculling Ladder time trial at the Marina in Cork. The UCC man, the outright sculling ladder winner for the two seasons and time trial winner 12 months ago, won in a time of seven minutes 12 seconds from Dan Begley of Shandon, and joint-third placed Stephen O’Sullivan (Shandon) and Barry O’Flynn (Cork BC).

 Margaret Cremen of Lee Rowing Club – also the ladder winner last season – won the women’s section. She recorded a time of eight minutes and .8 of a second. Aoife Lynch (Lee) was second and Elma Bouanane of Fermoy third.

 The ladder continues until the April 2nd, 2017.

 Cork Sculling Ladder 2016 Time Trial: Results

Men

1 Ronan Byrne, UCC.  7: 12.00

2 Dan Begley, Shandon BC. 7: 14.7

3= Stephen O’Sullivan, Shandon BC. 7: 23.6

3= Barry O’Flynn, Cork BC. 7: 23.6

5 Colm Hennessy, Shandon BC. 7: 29.7

6 Jack Casey, Shandon BC. 7: 31.8

7  Andy Harrington, Shandon BC. 7: 33.6  

Women

1 Margaret Cremen, Lee RC. 8: 00.8

2 Aoife Lynch, Lee RC. 8: 31.3

3 Selma Bouanane, Fermoy RC. 8: 32.5

4 Aoife Higgins, Cork BC. 8: 43.4

5 Clara O’Sullivan, Cork BC. 8: 44.1

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ireland's junior men's double finished the World Rowing Regatta by taking a very encouraging second place in the B Final. The ambitious duo of Ronan Byrne and Daire Lynch fought it out with the Netherlands for third in the middle stages as South Africa and Canada disputed the lead. But Ireland put in an excellent second half in the strong tailwind conditions. They passed the Netherlands and then Canada and were just 1.33 seconds behind South Africa on the line. Byrne and Lynch place eighth in the world.

World Rowing Championships, Rotterdam (Irish interest; Selected Results)

Men

Junior Double Sculls - B Final (Places 7 to 12): 1 South Africa 6:32.29, 2 Ireland (R Byrne, D Lynch) 6:33.72.

Women

Junior Double Sculls - B Final (Places 7 to 12): 1 Spain 7:13.72; 6 Ireland (A Casey, E Hegarty) 7:22.68.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The Ireland junior double of Ronan Byrne and Daire Lynch took second place in their heat and qualified for the quarter-finals of the World Championships in Rotterdam today. New Zealand took over from early leaders South Africa in the middle of the race and were the clear winners. Four crews would qualify, but Ireland and Belarus raced the final stages to see who could place second, and Byrne and Lynch won this - by seven hundredths of a second. South Africa took fourth.

World Rowing Championships, Rotterdam (Irish interest, selected results)

Men

Junior Double Sculls - Heat Five (Four to Quarter-Finals; rest to repechage): 1 New Zealand 6:28.44, 2 Ireland (R Byrne, D Lynch) 6:33.28, 3 Belarus 6:33.35, 4 South Africa 6:37.82.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Skibbereen brought their tally of titles for the Irish Rowing Championships to a remarkable 10 so far as Denise Walsh and Shane O'Driscoll had big wins in the lightweight single sculls in the morning session of the third day.

 Shandon's win in the men's junior double was a sweet one for Stephen O'Sullivan and Ronan Byrne. They led Clonmel all down the course and held off push after push in the final 500 metres.  Strokeman O'Sullivan shouted with joy at the finish, but it was a particularly big win for Byrne. He had been beaten by the Clonmel strokeman, Daire Lynch, in the junior single. Byrne and Lynch team up in the Ireland junior double for the World Championships.  

 Cork Boat Club's good run in junior events continued, as Amy Mason and Tara Hanlon won the junior pair. Portora won the men's intermediate pair and NUIG the club coxed four. Commercial led all the way in the women's intermediate four and had a clearwater margin at the finish.

Irish Rowing Championships, National Rowing Centre, Day Three (Selected Results, Finals)

Men

Four - Club, coxed: NUIG 6:33.156.

Pair - Inter: Portora 6:49.900.

Sculling, Double - Junior: 1 Shandon A 6:36.777, 2 Clonmel 6:39.324, Castleconnell A 6:51.168.

Lightweight Single: 1 Skibbrereen (S O'Driscoll) 7:15.482, 2 Skibbereen (A Burns) 9:08.433, 3 Carlow (O Nolan) 7:36.764.

Women

Four - Inter, coxed: Commercial 7:20.348.

Pair - Junior: 1 Cork 7:35.640, 2 Bann 7:41.453, 3 Shannon 7:41.750

Sculling - Lightweight Single: Skibbereen (D Walsh) 7:54.535, 2 Carlow (A Byrne) 8:21.130, 3 Queen's (R Brown) 8:33.287.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ronan Byrne has retained his title on the Cork Sculling Ladder 2015/2016. The Shandon man was the overall winner, and also topped the junior and intermediate sections. Margaret Cremen from Lee was not only the top woman, but also took the junior 16 and junior 18 bow, along with the intermediate and club one and club two sections. In a revision of the final finishing positions, Dan Begley of Shandon Boat Club has been named as the Club One winner.

2015 – 2016 Cork Sculling Ladder Winners

Overall Winner  :  (1) Ronan Byrne  -  Shandon Boat Club  (retained)

Women’s Overall Winner  :  (49) Margaret Cremen  -  Lee Rowing Club

Section Winners

Men

Open :  (1) Ronan Byrne  -  Shandon Boat Club

Intermediate :  (1) Ronan Byrne  -  Shandon Boat Club

Novice :  (19) Hugh Sutton  -  Lee Rowing Club

Club 1 :  (4)  Dan Begley - Shandon Boat Club

Club 2 :  (7) Darragh Larkin  -  Lee Rowing Club 

Junior 18 :  (1) Ronan Byrne  -  Shandon Boat Club

Junior 16 :  (8) Barry O’Flynn  -  Cork Boat Club

Junior 15 :  (12) Thomas Murphy  -  Lee Rowing Club

Junior 14 :  (47) Tim Buckley  -  Lee Rowing Club

Junior 13 :  (115) Sean McCalgon  -  Lee Rowing Club

Junior 12 :  (151) Peter Leonard  -  Cork boat Club 

Masters A :  (20) Donal Smith  -  Shandon Boat Club

Masters B :  (21) Henrik Merz  -  Shandon Boat Club

Masters C :  (21) Henrik Merz  -  Shandon Boat Club

Masters D :  (56) Pat Peilow  -  Cork Boat Club

Masters E :  (56) Pat Peilow  -  Cork Boat Club

Masters F :  (66) Tony Corcoran  -  Lee Valley Rowing Club

Masters G :  (66) Tony Corcoran  -  Lee Valley Rowing Club

Masters H :  (166) Seamus Quain  -  Shandon Boat Club

Masters I :  (166) Seamus Quain  -  Shandon Boat Club

Women

Open :  (49) Margaret Cremen  -  Lee Rowing Club

Intermediate :  (49) Margaret Cremen  -  Lee Rowing Club

Novice :  (82) Marie Kidney  -  Lee Rowing Club

Club 1 :  (49) Margaret Cremen  -  Lee Rowing Club

Club 2 :  (49) Margaret Cremen  -  Lee Rowing Club

Junior 18 :  (49) Margaret Cremen  -  Lee Rowing Club

Junior 16 :  (49) Margaret Cremen  -  Lee Rowing Club

Junior 15 : (69) Anne O’Farrell  -  Cork Boat Club

Junior 14 :  (82) Marie Kidney  -  Lee Rowing Club

Junior 13 : (128) Jennifer Forde  -  Shandon Boat Club

Junior 12 : (128) Jennifer Forde  -  Shandon Boat Club

Masters A :  (132) Karen Corcoran O’Hare  -  Lee Valley Rowing Club

Masters B : (132) Karen Corcoran O’Hare  -  Lee Valley Rowing Club

Masters C : (155) Karen Dunne McCarthy  -  Cork Boat Club

Masters D : (157) Mary O’Callaghan  -  Lee Rowing Club

Masters E : (157) Mary O’Callaghan  -  Lee Rowing Club

 Results.

                           

                 

Saturday 26.03.2016.

 (22) Evan Curtin  -  Cork Boat Club bt  (16) David Higgins  -  Presentation College Rowing Club.   4L.

(50) Conor Twohig  -  Cork Boat Club bt  (45) Patrick Kenneally  -  Presentation College Rowing Club.   1 1/4L.

(25) Donal Smith  -  Shandon Boat Club bt   (20) Henrik Merz  -  Shandon Boat Club.  1 3/4L.                   

(47) Tim Buckley  -  Lee Rowing Club bt  (48) David Cosgrave  -  Shandon Boat Club.  5L.

 (82) Sophie Grey  -  Lee Rowing Club bt  (FC) (107) Hannah Cummins  -  Lee Rowing Club.  5L.

 (10) Liam O’Connell  -  Cork Boat Club bt  (11) Cathal Merz  -  Shandon Boat Club.  5L.

Starter / Umpires : Finbarr Desmond, Kieran O’Sullivan and Pat Hickey.

Sunday

 (FC)(91) Marie Kidney  -  Lee Rowing Club bt  (82) Sophie Grey  -  Lee Rowing Club.   5L. 

1. (1) Ronan Byrne  -  Shandon Boat Club bt  (4) Dan Begley  -  Shandon Boat Club.   4L. 

Starter / Umpires :  Finbarr Desmond and Kieran O’Sullivan.

Tuesday

(82) Marie Kidney  - Lee RC bt (FC)C87) Claragh O’Sullivan  -  Cork Boat Club.   1 L.

Starter   / Umpires :  Finbarr Desmond and Kieran Hughes.

 

Cork Sculling Ladder 2015 - 2016
27/03/2016
Position
Club
Sculler
Grades
Leaders
1
Shandon Boat Club
Ronan Byrne #
J18, I, O
J18, I, O
2
Shandon Boat Club
Colm Hennessey #
I, O
3
UCC
Jack Casey
C1, I, O
C1
4
Shandon Boat Club
Dan Begley (FC)
C1, I, O
5
Shandon Boat Club
Stephen O'Sullivan
J18,I, O
6
Shandon Boat Club
Sean Lonergan
J18,C1, I, O
7
Lee Rowing Club
Darragh Larkin
J18, C2, C1, I, O
C2
8
Cork Boat Club
Barry O'Flynn
J16, J18, C1, I, O
J16
9
Shandon Boat Club
Stewart Channon
C1, I, O
10
Cork Boat Club
Liam O'Connell (FC)
J18, C1, I, O
11
Shandon Boat Club
Cathal Merz
C2, C1, I, O
12
Lee Rowing Club
Thomas Murphy
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
J15
13
Cork Boat Club
Barry Connolly
J16, J18, C1, I, O
14
Cork Boat Club
Feargal O'Sullivan
J18, C1, I, O
15
Lee Rowing Club
David Breen
J18, C1, I, O
16
Cork Boat Club
Evan Curtin (FC)
J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
17
Presentation College Rowing Club
David Higgins
J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
18
Shandon Boat Club
Conor Cudden
J18, C2, C1, I, O
19
Lee Rowing Club
Hugh Sutton
J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
Novice
20
Shandon Boat Club
Donal Smith
MA, C2, C1, I, O
MA
21
Shandon Boat Club
Henrik Merz
MA, MB, MC, C2, C1, I, O
MB, MC
22
Shandon Boat Club
Chris Horgan
MA, C1, I, O
23
Cork Boat Club
Cormac Corkery (FC)
J18, C2, C1, I, O
24
Lee Rowing Club
Peter Jackson
J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
25
Lee Rowing Club
Eoin Larkin
J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
26
Shandon Boat Club
Sam O'Neill
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
27
Cork Boat Club
Neil McCarthy
C1, I, O
28
Presentation College Rowing Club
Alan O' Keeffe
J18, C2, C1, I, O
29
Lee Rowing Club
Shane Crean
J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
30
Cork Boat Club
Conor McCarthy
J18, C2, C1, I, O
31
Shandon Boat Club
Alex Byrne (FC)
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
32
Shandon Boat Club
Eoin Gaffney
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
33
Cork Boat Club
James O'Leary
C1, I, O
34
Cork Boat Club
Danny Peilow
C1, I, O
35
Shandon Boat Club
Brian O'Keefe (FC)
MA, MB, C1, I, O
36
Cork Boat Club
Brian Crean #
MA, MB, MC, C1, I, O
37
Shandon Boat Club
William Ronayne (FC)
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
38
Lee Rowing Club
Ray Fitzgerald
J18, C2, C1, I, O
39
Cahir Rowing Club
David Heffernan #
MA, MB, C1, I, O
40
Cork Boat Club
Cian O'Sullivan
J16, J18, C1, I, O
41
Shandon Boat Club
Emmet Hickey
J18, C1, I, O
42
Cork Boat Club
David Collins
C1, I, O
43
Lee Rowing Club
Morgan O'Hara
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
44
Shandon Boat Club
Jerome Arrigan (FC)
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
45
Cork Boat Club
Conor Twohig (FC)
J18, C2, C1, I, O
46
Presentation College Rowing Club
Patrick Kennelly
J18, C2, C1, I, O
47
Lee Rowing Club
Tim Buckley
J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
J14
48
Shandon Boat Club
David Cosgrove
J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
49
Lee Rowing Club
Margaret Cremen
J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
WJ16, WJ18, WC2, WC1, WI, WO
50
Shandon Boat Club
Rob Diffley
MA, C2, C1, I, O
51
Cork Boat Club
Ross Cudmore (FC)
J18, C2, C1, I, O
52
Presentation College Rowing Club
Luke Guerin
J18, C2, C1, I, O
53
Lee Rowing Club
Luke Filan
J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
54
Shandon Boat Club
John O'Neill
MA, MB, MC, C2, C1, I, O
55
Lee Rowing Club
Conor O'Malley (FC)
J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
56
Cork Boat Club
Pat Peilow
MA, MB, MC, MD, ME, C1, I, O
MD, ME
57
Shandon Boat Club
Noel Carey
MA, MB, C2, C1, I, O
58
Cork Boat Club
Aidan O'Sullivan
J18, C1, I, O
59
Cork Boat Club
Kieran White (FC)
J18, C1, I, O
60
Presentation College Rowing Club
Jack O' Donovan
J18, C2, C1, I, O
61
Lee Rowing Club
Willow Littlewood
J18, C1, I, O
62
Shandon Boat Club
Jack Leggett
J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
63
Lee Rowing Club
Sam Jackson
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
64
Shandon Boat Club
Dan O'Neill
J16, J18, C1, I, O
65
Shandon Boat Club
James Hodkinson
C1, I, O
66
Lee Valley Rowing Club
Tony Corcoran #
MA, MB, MC, MD, ME, MF, MG, I, O
MF, MG
Results by Category Page 1 of 3
Cork Sculling Ladder 2015 - 2016
27/03/2016
67 Lee Rowing Club Eimear Cummins J18, C1, I, O
68 Shandon Boat Club Chelsey Minihane J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
69 Cork Boat Club Anne O'Farrell J15, J16, J18, C1, I, O WJ15
70 Shandon Boat Club Jennifer Crowley J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
71 Presentation College Rowing Club James Ginnelley J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
72 Lee Rowing Club Maedhbh Heaney J18, C1, I, O
73 Cork Boat Club Amy Mason J18, C2, C1, I, O
74 Presentation College Rowing Club Daniel Ghori J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
75 Cork Boat Club Aine Rice J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
76 Lee Rowing Club Tony Donlon J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
77 Presentation College Rowing Club Cormac O'Connell J18, C2, C1, I, O
78 Presentation College Rowing Club Harry Scannell J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
79 Lee Rowing Club Jennifer Murphy J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
80 Presentation College Rowing Club Tom Walsh J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
81 Lee Rowing Club Luke Lee J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
82 Lee Rowing Club Maria Kidney (FC) J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
Women's Novice,
WJ14
83 Lee Rowing Club Sophie Gray J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
84 Shandon Boat Club Julie Harrington J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
85 Cork Boat Club Erika Deasy J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
86 Lee Rowing Club Ronan O'Callaghan J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
87 Cork Boat Club Claragh O'Sullivan J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
88 Shandon Boat Club Mia Kovacs J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
89 Presentation College Rowing Club Tom Murphy J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
90 Cork Boat Club Ciara McCarthy J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
91 Lee Rowing Club Muireann Heaney J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
92 Cork Boat Club Ciara Murphy J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
93 Lee Rowing Club Jani Vermaak J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
94 Cork Boat Club Sinead Hegarty J18, C2, C1, I, O
95 Presentation College Rowing Club Ben Corcoran J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
96 Presentation College Rowing Club Sam Crean J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
97 Lee Rowing Club Aoife Cummins J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
98 Cork Boat Club Aoife Higgins J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
99 Fermoy RC Erin O'Sullivan J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
100 Cork Boat Club Jane Duggan J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
101 Cork Boat Club James O'Halloran MA, MB, MC, MD, ME, C1, I, O
102 Cork Boat Club Matt Mallen J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
103 Cork Boat Club Hannah Dupuis J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
104 Shandon Boat Club Mide Dinneen J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
105 Presentation College Rowing Club Misha O Flynn J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
106 Presentation College Rowing Club Mel Holohan J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
107 Lee Rowing Club Hannah Cummins (FC) J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
108 Shandon Boat Club Aine Hosford J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
109 Lee Rowing Club Eabha Keely J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
110 Lee Rowing Club Ciara Murphy J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
111 Cahir Rowing Club Katie Sutcliffe J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
112 Lee Rowing Club Emma Breen J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
113 Lee Rowing Club Neasa Coleman J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
114 Shandon Boat Club Megan Cuttriss J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
115 Lee Rowing Club Sean McCalgon
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I,
O
J13
116 Cork Boat Club Julie Mackey J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
117 Cork Boat Club Katie McCarthy J15, J16, J18, C1, I, O
118 Presentation College Rowing Club Liam Rooke J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
119 Cork Boat Club Moira O'Sullivan J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
120 Lee Rowing Club Andrew Sheehan
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I,
O
121 Cork Boat Club Caoilinn Hughes J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
122 Presentation College Rowing Club Jacques Mattieu J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
123 Shandon Boat Club Anna Hernon J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
124 Lee Rowing Club Aoife Coleman J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
125 Lee Rowing Club Abbie Cummins J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
126 Cork Boat Club Ross Madden J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
127 Cork Boat Club Stephanie Murphy J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
128 Shandon Boat Club Jennifer Forde
J12, J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2,
C1, I, O
WJ12, WJ13
129 Cork Boat Club John Kearney J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
130 Presentation College Rowing Club Jack Murphy J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
Results by Category Page 2 of 3
Cork Sculling Ladder 2015 - 2016
27/03/2016
131
Presentation College Rowing Club
Alex Guerin
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
132
Lee Valley Rowing Club
Karen Corcoran O'Hare +
WMA, WMB, C2, C1, I, O
WMA, WMB
133
Lee Rowing Club
Alex O'Mahony
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
134
Shandon Boat Club
Aisha McCarthy
J18, C2, C1, I, O
135
Cork Boat Club
Claire Ryan
N, C2, C1, I, O
136
Shandon Boat Club
Sinead Buckley
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
137
Cork Boat Club
James Kelly
J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
138
Cork Boat Club
Siofra O'Flynn
J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
139
Shandon Boat Club
Ciara Harrington
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
140
Cahir Rowing Club
Nollaig Heffernan
WMA, WMB, N, C2, C1, I, O
141
Lee Rowing Club
Robyn Smith
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
142
Cork Boat Club
Seana Hughes
J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
143
Shandon Boat Club
Meave Reardon
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
144
Presentation College Rowing Club
Brian McGrath
J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
145
Cork Boat Club
Eve Kelly
J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
146
Lee Rowing Club
Gemma Albone
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
147
Presentation College Rowing Club
Ibrahim Salih
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
148
Lee Rowing Club
Jane O'Riordan
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
149
Cork Boat Club
Hannah Gahan
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
150
Presentation College Rowing Club
Callum O' Donovan
J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
151
Cork Boat Club
Peter Leonard
J12, J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
J12
152
Cork Boat Club
Robert Neff
J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
153
Lee Rowing Club
Ashling Gaffney
J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
154
Cork Boat Club
Emma Hanley
N, C2, C1, I, O
155
Cork Boat Club
Karen McCarthy
WMA, WMB, WMC, N, C2, C1, I, O
WMC
156
Lee Rowing Club
Bevin Ford
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
157
Lee Rowing Club
Mary O'Callaghan
MA, MB, MC, MD, ME, N, C2, C1, I, O
WMD, WME
158
Cork Boat Club
Katie Hughes
J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
159
Presentation College Rowing Club
Omar Elbastawaisi
J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
160
Lee Rowing Club
Alex Toderica
J12, J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
161
Cork Boat Club
David Law
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
162
Shandon Boat Club
Orla Gaffney
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
163
Lee Rowing Club
Alex Stradnic
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
164
Cork Boat Club
Oscar Moore
J14, J15, J16, J18, C2, C1, I, O
165
Shandon Boat Club
Jim Conroy
MA, MB, MC, MD, ME, MF, C1, I, O
166
Shandon Boat Club
Seamus Quain
MA, MB, MC, MD, ME, MF, MG, MH, MI, C1, I, O
MH, MI
167
Presentation College Rowing Club
Ciaran Odlum
J13, J14, J15, J16, J18, N, C2, C1, I, O
# denotes : Former Sculling Ladder Overall Winner
+ denotes : Former Sculling Ladder Women's Overall Winner.
Results by Category Page 3 of 3
Published in Rowing
Page 3 of 4

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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