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Displaying items by tag: Royal St George Yacht Club

Martin Byrne’s Jaguar Dragon Sailing Team finished in sixth place overall at the Marblehead Trophy in Vilamoura, Portugal on Saturday.

The Royal St George team comprised Byrne, Adam Winkelmann and John Simms.

The small 12 boat but very competitive fleet was topped by European Champion Jens Christensen from Denmark who launched a brand new Dragon for this event and won by six points.

Recent Gold Cup winner and Vendee Globe competitor Pieter Heerema from the Netherlands was second with the holder of the Marblehead Trophy and current European Champion Pedro Andrade from Portugal in third.

Results are here

Published in Dragon

The Royal St George Yacht Club has endorsed former Commodore Martin Byrne’s Jaguar Sailing Team as their representative at this week's Dragon Marblehead Trophy in Vilamoura, Portugal.

A four-time winner of the Irish Dragon Championship and a former Edinburgh Cup (British Nationals) winner Byrne has been competing on the international Dragon circuit for a number of years. But Covid related restrictions has curtailed his team’s activities over the last two seasons.

Normal service has almost resumed and his Jaguar Sailing Team is located in Vilamoura, Portugal for the Dragon winter series.

This week they compete in the prestigious Marblehead Trophy where they will be one of the only Corinthian teams in a small but very hot lineup of international Dragon champions which includes the current Gold Cup and European Champions as well as multiple Olympic medalists.

It’s no surprise that Byrne’s crew includes Adam Winkelmann (RIYC) who has shared in all of the team's successes and is completed by Laser veteran and offshore helm John Simms from Royal Ulster YC.

Byrne’s told Afloat he was relieved the team successfully negotiated the crew weigh-in procedure and that their impressive form in the recent Portuguese National Championships, where they were unlucky to finish 5th, would be no indication as to the "daunting challenge" facing them this week.

More here

Published in Dragon

15 Waszp foiling dinghies, including with three from the UK, contested last weekend's National Championships on Dublin Bay.

As Afloat reported earlier here,  it was hard, fast sailing in heavy winds and choppy conditions at the Royal St George Yacht Club event.

Now a class video (below) shows off more of the high speed foiling action from the Bay. 

UK sailor Ross Banham as overall winner in 8.2 m fleet, followed by Arthur Fry, both from Hayling Island sailing club, UK. Henry Start of the RSGYC came a close third overall and was National Waszp champion in this fleet.

In the 6.9m fleet overall winner and national winner was Emily Conan RSGYC, followed closely by Kate Tingle RSGYC /RCYC in second and Tom Hogan RSGYC in third place.

Tom was also first master. Elysia O’Leary RSGYC was first Irish female in 8.2 fleet and Max Goodbody RSGYC/RIYC was first under 19 years in the 8.2m fleet.

Prizewinners are photographed below by Simon McIlwaine

Waszp 2021 National Championship Prizewinners at the Royal St. George Yacht ClubWaszp 2021 National Championship Prizewinners at the Royal St. George Yacht Club Photo: Simon McIlwaine

Published in RStGYC

The Royal St. George YC has announced the launch of a unique Laser (ILCA) sprint regatta series in association with sponsor Grant Thornton.

The Laser dinghy fleet in Dun Laoghaire and across the country has been having a bumper season with record attendance numbers at various regional and national events. The Royal St. George YC, with probably the largest Laser fleet in the country, has just announced a unique series of one-day regattas to encourage more people into the sport.

Commencing on October 9th, with a ‘Race with Champions’ event, the regatta series will consist of 4 events between now and next summer. The ‘Race with Champions’ format sees national champions from across the 4.7, Radial and Standard rigs in the Laser invited to compete with sailors of all levels of experience in a fun yet competitive event format.

Each regatta comprises five short races of 20-30 minutes in duration with separate prize categories across the different rigs, genders and ages. There is particular emphasis from the race committee on ensuring a fast-paced and fun event for competitors of all ages and abilities. Novice sailors are most welcome as this provides a unique format to be involved in racing at the highest level across the Irish fleet.

"Over 100 Lasers in the Royal St. George YC across all ages"

Speaking at the announcement of the series, Royal St. George YC Laser class captain, Brendan Hughes said, “We’re delighted to announce the launch of the Grant Thornton ILCA Sprint Regatta series and are very grateful to our sponsors for making this possible. The purpose behind the series is to provide a format for more sailors to have an opportunity to experience racing in a Laser, in a relaxed yet competitive environment. We now have over 100 Lasers in the Royal St. George YC across all ages and we’re eager to provide them with as many opportunities as possible to have fun on the water.”

Royal St. George YC Laser class captain, Brendan HughesRoyal St. George YC Laser class captain, Brendan Hughes
Mick Shelley of Grant Thornton Ireland is himself a Laser sailor and he said that; “Sailing and in particular Laser sailing is a great sport for both male and female, young and old to be involved in. The modest cost of the Laser dinghy has meant that sailing has become accessible to many people and Grant Thornton Ireland are proud to be associated with this series.”

Published in RStGYC

Despite Covid restrictions, The Irish 12 Foot Dinghy Championship took place in Dun Laoghaire Harbour in both 2020 and 2021. This year the entry numbers were reduced due to one dinghy being trapped in Mayo with a broken trailer, and the painting of another dinghy not been completed in time. Despite this, the championship was hard-fought and the deserved winner was Margaret Delany's 100-year-old 'Cora', which was built by Camper and Nicholson in Gosport or Southampton for Lieut. Colonel the Hon. Claud Maitland Patrick Brabazon, son of the 12th Earl of Meath in 1921.

In race one over a triangular course with about 6 knots of breeze, 'Cora' was a premature starter, and despite her excellent speed, she could not get near Andrew and George Miller in 'Pixie'. Third place was taken by David and Henry Shackleton in the beautifully prepared 'Scythian', and Gail Varian and Gavin Johnston in 'Albany' were fourth.

Due to some ambiguity as to whether the boats were required to pass through the start-finish line on intermediate rounds race two was scrapped. All the crews went ashore for a sociable lunch in the Royal St George Yacht Club, where they were joined by some former 12 foot dinghy sailors and discussions ranged from absent friends to travel to international regattas.

Margaret Delany in the 100 year old CoraMargaret Delany in the 100-year-old Cora dinghy

In the afternoon, the breeze had increased slightly. Again 'Pixie' dominated partly because 'Cora' was obliged to take a penalty turn soon after the start. The finishing order after two laps was 'Pixie', 'Cora', 'Albany' and 'Scythian'. The third race was controlled by 'Cora', who was pushed hard by 'Albany', which had better upwind speed. 'Pixie' was third and 'Scythian' fourth. The final race again fell to 'Cora' who sailed a faultless race to win the championship on countback as winner of the last race.

At the prize-giving at the Royal St George Yacht Club, championship chairman Vincent Delany congratulated the Irish 12 Foot dinghy Championship winner, wished 'Pixie' the best of luck at her forthcoming regatta in Monaco. Delany thanked the Windyridge Garden Centre for their sponsorship of the prizes for the event and looked forward to an increased entry for the 2022 Irish champion

Published in RStGYC

This was the first-ever Irish Championships for the Bray Droleen Class, despite the 12-foot catboats being designed by William Ogilvy in 1896. How was this the case? The nine boat fleet raced regularly between 1897 and 1902, and thereafter the fleet in Bray collapsed for a number of reasons. In the 19th century, there were no races for the Droleens except off Bray Promenade and some east coast regattas. There was no racing for the Class in the 20th Century. Since 2013, many boats have been built in various parts of the country, so when they came together for a championship in Dun Laoghaire on 29 August, this was their first National Championship.

The Droleens had previously raced in Kingstown and sailed from Bray to compete at the Kingstown Township Regatta. This year all but one Droleen arrived by road trailer, and one arrived on a 20-ton seaweed truck which managed to stop the traffic in Dun Laoghaire while unloading its precious cargo.

Bray Droleens - Windyridge, Galway Girl and Bray HeritageBray Droleens - Windyridge, Galway Girl and Bray Heritage

In race one, held in a six-knot breeze, Mark Delany sailing Philip Harvey's 'Windyridge' which was built in Cavan by Paddy Sheridan, dominated and took the gun with Jim Horgan's self-built 'Galway Girl' in second place. Paul and Tony Finnegan's 'Bray Heritage, ' which was built by a team of volunteers under Frank DeGroot, was late for the start and was unable to make an impression. Race two resulted in the same finishing order, 'Galway Girl' being hampered by the enclosed environment of Dun Laoghaire harbour and preferring the open waters of Greatman's Bay off Connemara. All the competitors came ashore for a sociable lunch in the clubhouse and conversations about boats and boatbuilding and how to rig the Droleens to best effect. In the first afternoon race over a smaller course, 'Windyridge' again dominated while 'Galway Girl' retired and 'Bray Heritage' was challenged by the light winds. In the final race 'Windyridge' managed to pull off a port tack start, much to the surprise of the other competitors.

Galway GirlGalway Girl

WindyridgeWindyridge

At the prize-giving at the Royal St George Yacht Club, championship chairman Vincent Delany expressed a hope that the Droleens would compete together again before the end of the season, and hopefully in Bray, and including Michael Weed's beautiful 'Donegal' Droleen.

Published in RStGYC

The Royal Saint George Yacht Club welcomes youth team racers from around the country for its Elmo Trophy competition on August 28th and 29th in Dun Laoghaire Harbour on Dublin Bay.

The event will be sailed in three flights of Firefly dinghies, where teams of six crews will race each other in a round-robin format.

Download the Notice of Race below

Teams must consist of six members from the same club, school or dinghy association. At least two members must be aged 16 and under on 31st December 2021. All team members must be aged 19 or under on 31st December 2021 and still attending second level education in 2021 (i.e. the event is not aimed at University Students).

The home team will hope to defend the trophy won by 'Curious George' in 2019 when 130 races were sailed over the weekend.

This year will see some new entrants such as Glandore Harbour Yacht Club, who have been training in a fleet of Fireflies already this season.

The Elmo trophyThe Royal St. George's Elmo Trophy

The unique format of the event looks to split teams into pools of equal standards to ensure close racing for all while allowing every pool to have a chance to qualify for the quarter-finals.

To be placed on the entry list, email John Sheehy – [email protected]

Download the Notice of Race below as PDF document

Published in Team Racing

There is a new addition to the small but highly competitive J/80 Dublin Bay race fleet. Supported by their club the Royal Saint George in Dun Laoghaire Harbour, the 'Jeorgettes' are an all-female crew competing in their first season in the 2021 DBSC racing series writes Ali Robinson.

"It's exciting for the club," says Sailing Manager Ronan Adams, "it's imperative we ensure an entry pathway for women sailors wanting to develop their racing skills, and we are supporting our female club members and sailors, by providing a J80 for the season".

A competitive group of 16 RStGYC sailors have come together to compete head to head with the other Dublin Bay J80s in the Sportsboat & Dragon class, which is an exciting fleet and growing in size every year.

Training began back in May when the Jeorgettes entered the DBSC race training series, and they have gone from strength to strength training on Wednesdays and racing on Thursdays.

The George is a very successful and active club with many of the sports top sailors competing at junior, national and master's levels across a number of fleets. Last year, the club, along with a few female sailors recognised the number of female members at either beginner or improver levels who had an interest in crewing and developing their skills on the water, so after a few conversations, a plan was put in place to meet this demand and provide a springboard platform from which to encourage and develop female club members into the world of racing.
"Approximately 10% of the entire DBSC series are female skippers" says helm Ali Robinson who feels this initiative is a really great opportunity to get out there and mix it up with the guys.

The J/80 Jeorgette team from the Royal St. George Yacht Club out training in their home waters of Dun Laoghaire HarbourThe J/80 Jeorgette team from the Royal St. George Yacht Club out training in their home waters of Dun Laoghaire Harbour

"The best way to improve as a sailor is to go racing, buts it's also important not to over face anyone and to recognise different skills and abilities needed to balance the boat with a mix of experience and energy. We have a pool of sailors ranging from beginners, cruisers, laser masters and transatlantic offshore sailors! The aim is to build resilience in the group this season. We do this by rotating crew positions each week so no one is stuck on any one job all the time. We already have a core of racing fit crew with more and more getting their racing toes wet each week which is brilliant! "

Team Manager Joanne Shelly was successful in securing additional sponsorship, which was very kindly provided by Grant Thornton, which helps to ensure the costs of managing a racing team are not prohibitive. Joanne says, "this is a gateway for women who want to experience the sport in an inclusive and encouraging environment where it's not just about winning, its about the joy of sailing and spending time on the water, understanding the weather and tides and how a boat works. We are really looking forward to continuing this into next year".

The Royal St. George J/80 fleetThe Royal St. George J/80 fleet is supported by Grant Thornton

Sailing can be perceived as requiring strength and power, but its not just about that, sailing and particularly racing requires intelligent tactics, strategy, teamwork, knowledge of the winds and tides, boat handling, seamanship and most importantly, teamwork that utilises different skills across the boat which makes it a perfect forum to bring together female sailors from all experience levels.

Kate Fogarty, Rear Commodore (Sailing) in the RStGYC, is "delighted to support our female members on the water and are proud to have such an enthusiastic group of fellow members representing the club". Many of the newer members have learnt to sail through the RSGYC USail Programme, the RStGYC dedicated Adult Sailing Programme, which provides an exciting introduction to the sport for beginners and is open to members and non-members alike.

Halfway into the season, the Jeorgettes have had good results and aim to continue improving. With their mid-summer Jeorgettes sailing dinner this Thursday and plans to compete in the Irish J/80 Nationals in Howth later this year, it sounds like champagne sailing all round! Good luck girls.

Published in RStGYC

Royal St George Yacht Club Sailor Tom Higgins put in an impressive performance to win all five races in the ILCA 7 (Laser standard) fleet and lift the winner's trophy at the Connaught championships. The event was hosted by Wexford Harbour Boat and Tennis Club in light breezes and hot and sunny weather.

To manage COVID risk, the event was capped at 100 sailors and was fully subscribed within days of opening. The large number of sailors who then went onto the waiting list in the hope of getting a place in the event attests to the popularity of the ILCA fleet in Ireland. With many high-performance sailors returning from international events, the standard was particularly high and made for exciting racing.

Second and third places in the ILCA7 (Laser standard) fleet were awarded to Jamie McMahon and Ewan McMahon, respectively. The two brothers from Howth Yacht Club managed to squeeze local sailor, Ronan Wallace of WHBTC, into fourth place. The master's category was won by Ross O'Leary of Royal St George, and the first youth sailor in the ILCA 7 was Kei Walker, also from the Royal St George.

In the ILCA 6 (Radial) fleet, the young Michael Crosbie of RCYC put in an impressive performance to lift the winner's trophy. Crosbie has recently returned from European Youth Radial Championships in Croatia, where he placed 32nd. Irish Academy sailor, Aoife Hopkins of Howth YC, finished second with young rising star, also of Howth Yacht Club, Eve McMahon finishing in 3rd. Eve also recently returned from the European Radial Youth Championships in Croatia where she finished with silver.

The scene at Wexford Harbour Boat Club for the Laser 'Connaught' ChampionshipsThe scene at Wexford Harbour Boat Club's dinghy park for the Laser 'Connaught' Championships

The first master in the ILCA 6 (Radial) fleet went to Sean Craig, who finished 9th overall. Craig, of the Royal St George, has had a fantastic season so far, being recently awarded the Afloat.ie "Sailor of the month for June 2021". He has been on top form, winning the Masters champs and the Ulster Champs within the last couple of months.

First prize for Lady Master in the ILCA 6 went to Shirley Gilmore of the Royal St George, who finished 15th overall, facing off strong competition from Alison Pigot of the National YC and placing impressively in a very strong fleet.

In the ILCA 4 (Laser 4.7 Fleet), the top 2 positions went to RCYC sailors, with James Dwyer finishing in first place and Darragh Collins taking silver. Krzysztof Ciborowski of Royal St George finished with Bronze.

The winner of the ILCA 4 fleet for the girls was Eimer McMorrow Moriarty of TBSC, with Isabel McCarthy of RCYC taking the second position and Hannah Dadley Young of Ballyhnolme YC placed the third girl.

Full results can be seen here

Published in Laser

The Dublin Bay Laser fleet based in Dun Laoghaire Harbour are celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Laser class with a novel one-day sprint regatta on July 25th.

The single-handed Laser remains one of the most popular one-design dinghies since it was officially unveiled at the New York Boat Show in 1971. Since then nearly 220,000 Lasers have been produced with ILCA class associations in 120 countries globally including Ireland.

The Dublin Bay Laser fleet is the largest in Ireland with over 100 boats sailed out of the RStGYC alone this season and many more launching from across the NYC, RIYC, DMYC, INSC clubs in addition to the Coal Harbour.

A limit of 100 boats can attend the Laser 50th celebrations on Dublin BayA limit of 100 boats can attend the Laser 50th celebrations on Dublin Bay

To mark the 50th anniversary, the RStGYC is hosting a special sprint regatta event, sponsored by Grant Thornton on Sunday, July 25th. The event is open to all Laser sailors across Dun Laoghaire both junior and adult and in all rigs.

With the first gun at 2 pm, there will be a minimum of five sprint races in quick succession for each fleet, with each race lasting between 20-30 minutes. Prizes will be awarded for the top three positions in each fleet with males and females ranked separately in 4.7s and Radials.

Racing will take place in Dublin Bay, which means that this will be a great practice event for local 4.7 sailors who are taking part in the ILCA 4.7 World Championship which is hosted in Dun Laoghaire between August 7-14.

50th anniversary Laser racing will take place on Dublin Bay50th anniversary Laser racing will take place on Dublin Bay

The Laser has been an Olympic class boat since 1996 and this year Ireland is being represented once again by Dun Laoghaire sailor Annalise Murphy in the Radial rig. This Dublin Bay event will coincide with the first Laser race in the Tokyo Olympics.

All activities will take place in accordance with government Covid-19 guidelines with briefing and other communications taking place virtually. A socially distanced closing ceremony will take place in the forecourt of the Royal St. George Yacht Club from 7 pm.

A socially distanced closing ceremony will take place in the forecourt of the Royal St. George Yacht ClubA socially distanced closing ceremony will take place in the forecourt of the Royal St. George Yacht Club

Early bird entry fee for the  Grant Thornton sponsored event is €20 with entry limited to 100 boats. Entry and further details are available on the Rstgyc website.

Published in Laser
Page 1 of 17

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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