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Displaying items by tag: Sail for Gold Regatta

#sailforgold – Six Irish sailing teams race tomorrow in the medal races at the Sail for Gold regatta in Weymouth and the forecast will be very much to the Irish team's liking; plenty of wind!

Winds were so strong today that overnight leaders in the 49er skiff class, Ireland's Ryan Seaton and Matt McGovern now head into the medal races with a winning margin.

In the Laser Radial class Annalise Murphy goes into the medal race in third place behind the Chinese girls but the Gold medal is already a foregone conclusion. 

The Laser Radial fleet completed two of the three scheduled races, and with a race win - Lilia Xu of China's seventh of the eleven races so far – followed by a third for her efforts today, the 2012 ISAF Rolex World Sailor of the year and Olympic medal winning Xu amassed a 22-point lead at the top of the table to take the Sail for Gold crown ahead of tomorrow’s double points-scoring medal race.

Also qualifying in the radial are Irish youth sailors Fionn Lyden and Finn Lynch.

And in an auspicious start to their Rio 2016 campaign Tiffany Brien and Saskia Tidey make the 49erfx medal race in their first regatta.

 

Published in Olympic

#ISA NEWS - The Irish Sailing Association's Olympic Department is inviting tenders for photographic services and social media content for the Irish sailing team at the Sail for Gold Regatta in Weymouth from 4-9 June.

The tender requires attendance at Sail for Gold from Wednesday 6 to Saturday 9 June inclusive.

The photography portion involves daily coverage of Irish sailors racing with a target of 6-10 images per sailor (schedule to be agreed with support team dependant on campaign performance and availability of media boats), plus headshots of the squad and support teams in team clothing, and group shots with and without support teams.

Social media content will involve daily pre-race audio and video with the performance director; daily audio/video with sailors from the media zone; and a micro documentary (3 minutes max) on pieces of interest from an Irish perspective.

Applications for this tender should be emailed to [email protected] by the closing date tomorrow, Friday 13 April 2012. A decision will be made before 20 April to allow time for accreditation and registration for media boats.

Full details on requirements and details of rights and pricing are available on the ISA website HERE.

Published in ISA

Peter O'Leary and Frithjof Kleen have won gold for Ireland this afternoon at the Skandia Sail for Gold Regatta.  The Irish -German duo left in their wake a string of world champions and Olympic medallists  including Torben Grael, Robert Sheidt and the current Olympic Gold Medallists, Britain's Ian Percy and Andrew Simpson.

Dun Laoghaire's Annalise Murphy who raced in the medal race for the Laser Radial class has finished tenth overall. Results HERE.

 

S4G10md_M9213

Peter O'Leary and Frithjof Kleen (IRL) in action before competitng in the
Star class medal race on day 6 of the Skandia Sail for Gold Regatta.
Peter O'Leary and Frithjof Kleen (IRL) in action in theStar class medal race on day 6 of the Skandia Sail for Gold Regatta. Photo: On Edition

Australia went home laden with gold after an astonishing week of racing in Weymouth Bay – the 2010 Olympic venue. The Aussies picked up gold in four classes; Nicky Souter, Nina Curtis and Olivia Price in the Women's Match Racing, the Skud-18 was won by Daniel Fitzgibbon and Rachael Cox on Friday, Tom Slingsby took gold in the Laser Men, and Nathan Outteridge and Iain Jensen made up the top quartet with a win in the 49er class.

The French team pushed Australia all the way, with three gold medals – Pierre Leboucher and Vincent Garos won the 470 Men, Charline Picon took gold home in the RS:X Women, and in the 2.4mR, it was Damien Seguin who did the business for France. The Dutch team then edged the home nation out of the gold medal table with wins in two classes, Marit Bouwmeester in the Laser Radial and Udo Hessels, Marcel van de Veen and Mischa Rossen in the Sonar. While Team Skandia GBR were left with a single gold, which was Giles Scott in the Finn. The consolation for the most successful Olympic sailing nation of the last three Olympiads was a hatful of silver and bronze – two silver and four bronze.

The venue, Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy is the 2012 Olympic venue and it threw everything at the competitors this week – saving the best for last, with a medal race day that was the best of the British summer; wind, rain, calms and even a little sunshine right at the end. The huge entry of 975 sailors from 57 nations spread across 712 boats in 13 classes will go home having learned to expect the unexpected in August 2012.

470 Men Results
Gold Leboucher and Garos FRA 31 points
Silver Belcher and Page AUS 35 points
Bronze Patience and Bithell GBR 58 points

470 Women's Results
Gold Kondo and Tabata JPN 74 points
Silver Pacheco and Betanzos ESP 91 points
Bronze Maxwell and Kinsolving USA 91 points

49er Results
Gold Outteridge and Jensen AUS 65 points
Silver Kruger Andersen and Thorsell DEN 82 points
Bronze Morrison and Rhodes GBR 84 points

Finn Results
Gold Scott GBR 60 points
Silver Lobert FRA 63 points
Bronze Kljakovic Gaspic CRO 66 points

Laser Results
Gold Slingsby AUS 62 points
Silver Goodison GBR 74 points
Bronze Leigh CAN 93 points

Laser Radial Results
Gold Bouwmeester NED 40 points
Silver Multala FIN 43 points
Bronze Winther NZL 46 points

RS:X Men's Results
Gold Rodrigues POR 38 points
Silver Van Rijsselberge NED 42 points
Bronze Dempsey GBR 43 points

RS:X Women Results
Gold Picon FRA 44 points
Silver Manchon ESP 50 points
Bronze Shaw GBR 63 points

Star results
Gold O'Leary and Kleen IRE 52 points
Silver Loof and Tillander SWE 61 points
Bronze Kusznierewicz and Zycki POL 65 points

Women's Match Racing
Gold - Souter, Curtis and Price AUS
Silver - Leroy, Bertrand  and Riou FRA
Bronze - Tunicliffe, Vandemer and Capozzi USA

2.4mR Results- Final
Gold Seguin FRA 12 points
Silver Schmitter NED 13 points
Bronze Kol NED 27 points

Skud-18 Results- Final
Gold Fitzgibbon and Cox AUS 11 points
Silver Rickham and Birrell GBR 14.7 points
Bronze McRoberts and Hopkin CAN 26 points

Sonar Results – Final
Gold Hessels, Rossen and Van de Veen NED 21 points
Silver Robertson, Stodel and Thomas GBR 26 points
Bronze Cohen, Vexler and Efrati ISR 27 points


 

Published in Olympics 2012

Ireland is guaranteed a medal today at the British Skandia Sail for Gold regatta in the Star class but Peter O'Leary's clean run in the keelboat this week was not without drama yesterday when his crew Fritjof Kleen slipped overboard 300 metres from the finish line.

The slip has cost them the lead at the top of the 36-boat fleet. Instead of having a six point cushion they have instead a 3 point deficit going into today's final that counts for double point scores.  A medal is guaranteed and it may yet be gold.
Annalise Murphy in the single handed Laser Radial dinghy can also rise as high as fifth in today's medal race that starts at 11am. 
Overall the result for both boats is being hailed by team management as a major step forward in Ireland's build up to the London Olympics in two years time.
Unfortunately for organisers who are aiming to put on a big show for sailing at the medal race finale, weather this morning in Weymouth is miserable.
Listen now to the podcast below with Ireland's team manager James O'Callaghan as Ireland goes afloat for a medal.

SFG10md_M7190

Peter O'Leary and Frithjof Kleen (IRL) against Fredrik Loof and Johan Tillannder (SWE) in the Star class on day 5 of the Skandia Sail for Gold Regatta. Photo: onEdition

Published in Olympics 2012
  • Entries for the 2010 Skandia Sail for Gold Regatta are now open, to enter online or download the Notice of Race log onto the event website which is now live at www.skandiasailforgoldregatta.co.uk

The fifth installment of this international regatta takes place between 9th – 14th August at the Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy in Dorset. In 2009 the Skandia Sail for Gold Regatta welcomed a record entry of over 600 sailors, the 2010 event is expected exceed this when it will host more than 750 sailors across 10 Olympic and 3 Paralympic classes. 

Skandia remains onboard as title sponsor for the event.  The Southampton-based long term investment company, which is well known for its support of sailing, has been title sponsor since the event’s inception in 2006.  Alongside Skandia, UK Sport has announced their continued involvement as an event partner. This forms part of UK Sport’s World Class Events Programme, which distributes approximately £4 million of Lottery funding each year to support the bidding and staging costs of major events on home soil, as well as providing specialist support to organisers.

Esther Nicholls, Events Consultant for UK Sport, said: “UK Sport is committed to bringing world class sporting events to the UK ahead of 2012, in what we believe will be the most comprehensive pre-Games events programme ever staged by an Olympic host nation.  Skandia Sail for Gold 2009 provided not only another invaluable opportunity for British sailors to compete at home, but also a step change in how spectators were able to engage with the event. UK Sport is delighted to be supporting Skandia Sail for Gold for the fifth consecutive year, and we look forward to seeing our athletes gain further knowledge of competing, and hopefully winning, on home waters ahead of 2012, as well as the continued evolution of the spectator experience.”

The Skandia Sail for Gold regatta is one of the biggest events on the 2010 sailing calendar, not only will it give competitors an opportunity to compete on Olympic and Paralympic waters ahead of 2012, but it will also play host to the seventh and final instalment of the 2009/10 edition of the ISAF Sailing World Cup series. Great Britain currently tops the rankings and will be looking to secure the overall title in Weymouth.

Utilising the power of the internet, the event will showcase online technology delivering sailing to a global audience through tracking, live interactive blogs and live radio. The event will be open to the general public who can come down each day to follow the racing onshore, there will be a giant screen broadcasting video and tracking, alongside live commentary.

“This is a crucial event on the calendar, it provides a unique opportunity for teams to compete at the state-of-the-art London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic sailing venue. We intend to bring sailing to the masses through the use of the latest technology and are working alongside Trac Trac and Be Tomorrow to deliver the very best user experience we can for the remote online audience. We will be revealing more extensive details of the tracking capabilities at the event soon,” commented Event Director David Campbell James. 

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 

Friday 6th August                   Event Office opens for registration 

Sunday 7th August                 Briefing for coaches and team leaders

Monday 9th August                 Racing day 1

Tuesday 10th August              Racing day 2             

Wednesday 11th August         Racing day 3

Thursday 12th August             Racing day 4 

Friday 13th August                  Racing day 5 

Saturday 14th August              Medal Races (no warning signal after 1530)

For the latest news, to enter online and for media accreditation go to: www.skandiasailforgoldregatta.co.uk 

Published in Olympics 2012

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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