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Displaying items by tag: Sean Jacob

#Rowing: The Old Collegians crew of Dave Neale and Sean Jacob lost out to Christiania Roklub of Norway in the Double Sculls at Henley Royal Regatta today. The Norwegians led from the start. They had carved out a one and three-quarter length lead by Fawley, and while the Irish crew kept them honest, they could not reel them in.

Henley Royal Regatta, Day Two (Selected Results, Irish interest)

Double Sculls (Open): K Lorentzen and S Vinje bt D Neale and S Jacob 2¾ l; 7:53.

Published in Rowing

#ROWING: Seán Jacob set a new record time of six minutes 11.56 seconds as he won the Dublin Sculling Ladder time trial on the Liffey today. Niall O’Toole, who also took part today, had set the longstanding record of 6:14 in 1992. Dave Neale was also inside the old record, with 6:13.40. Conditions were unusually good, with a tail wind. The fastest woman home was Sheila Clavin of St Michael’s in Limerick.

The event had a record entry of 212 scullers. Former Ireland international Tim Harnedy, who has been based in the United States, also took part.

Dublin Sculling Ladder Time Trial, Islandbridge to Chapelizod:

Men: 1 S Jacob (Old Collegians) 6:11.5, 2 D Neale (UCD) 6:13, 3 A Griffin (UCD) 6:28, 4 T Hughes (UCD) 6:30, 5 D Kelly (Garda) 6:34. Women: S Clavin (St Michael’s) 7:14.

 

 

48th DSL Time Trial Provisional Results      
 NameClub Overall   
 *: past winner, ~: past fastest woman minsec1/100ths  
1Sean JacobOC 61156New Record 
2David NealeUCD 61340Beat previous record 
3Andrew GriffinUCD 62879   
4Turlough HughesUCD 63046   
5Damien KellyGDBC 63436   
6Michael BaileyUCD 63479   
7Ian HurleyDuBC 63548   
8Patrick MooreUCD 6363   
9Michael MaherCommercial 63783   
10James GrahamCommercial 64193   
11Tim HarnedySkibbereen 6423   
12Como GianlucaDuBC 6434   
13Alan Mc KennaCommercial 6448   
14Paul MannixDuBC 64511   
15Alexander McEloveryDuBC 64698   
16Kevin MolloyAthlone 64751   
17Shane MulvaneyNeptune 64797Fastest Juniors Man 
18John MaganDuBC 64851   
19Conor CarrollCommercial 64931   
20Luke AchesonDuBC 64960   
21Dillion RooneyDuBC 65097   
22Tim KeenanCommercial 65267   
23Brendan SmythLEBC 65541   
24Paul FlahertyCommercial 65548   
25William DoyleNeptune 65584   
26Niall O TooleCommercial 65743   
27William YeomansCommercial 65770   
28Dan KeeganDuBC 65830   
29David BellNeptune 65856   
30Samuel TolandUCD 65878   
31Neil GahanCommercial 65880   
32mARK KELLYDuBC 65897   
33Marcus d'Estelle RoeCommercial 65973   
34Ewan MurrayPortora 65988   
35Sam KeoghDuBC 65998   
36Aidan HarwoodNeptune 703   
37David ButlerDuBC 705   
38David CormackNeptune 7050   
39Liam GleesonCommercial 715   
40A J RawlinsonNeptune 7131   
41Liam HawkesDuBC 7223   
42Kasper CoulterDuBC 7244   
43Killian DunneDuBC 746   
44Ollie DunneCommercial 7430   
45Mark McShaneUCD 757   
46Myles Mc CormickDuBC 761   
47Conor RyanDuBC 764   
48Michael CorcoranDuBC 7646   
49Philip MurphyGSBC 7662   
50Niall BegganCommercial 7669   
51Jamie PounchCommercial 7725   
52Mike HeaveyCommercial 7761   
53Tom EnglighNeptune 7764   
54Dennis CrowleyCommercial 7782   
55Barney RixPortora 7840   
56Francis O TooleCommercial 799   
57Conor KietryCommercial 7964   
58James O SullivanBlackrock 7984   
59Samuel ArmstrongPortora 7100   
60Rob FordePhoenix 71020   
61Reuben CruiseDuBC 71097   
62Jim PhelanCommercial 71129   
63Nimai RawlinsonNeptune 71189   
64Paul SweetmanCommercial 7120   
65Nick De MascioUCD 71216   
66Conolls EdwardsCommercial 71216   
67Patrick CostelloDuBC 71452   
68Sheila ClavinSt Michaels 71455Fastest Woman 
69Daire MacEoinGSBC 71672   
70Karl KavanaghDuBC 7182   
71Max RiegelDuBC 71820   
72Eimear LambeCommercial 71896Fastest Junior Woman 
73Pia DolanNeptune 72061   
74Ruth MorrisDULBC 72061   
75Evan GebierPortora 72097   
76Jeremy DoverDuBC 72099   
77Derek HollandPortora 72337   
78Naoise GrehamCommercial 7247   
79Eunan DolanNeptune 72551   
80Eoin GleesonBlackrock 72573   
81Siobhan Formanthree Castles 72658   
82Gerry MurphyNeptune 72697   
83Emer DesayNeptune 72815   
84Cillian RyanUCD 72880   
85Gemma FoleyCommercial 7293   
86Louis MahonDuBC 73113   
87Chris IrvinePortora 7322   
88Aaron JohnstonPortora 73222   
89Cormac KeoghCommercial 73255   
90George BrassilBlackrock 73335   
91Sally O BrienDuLBC 73351   
92Caitlin O ConnorPortora 73379   
93Hazel O NeillDuLBC 73412   
94Ross O MahonyBlackrock 73679   
95Scott AddisonDuBC 73687   
96Conor O KellyDuBC 73769   
97Turlough EcclesNeptune 73974   
98Caitriona JenningsCommercial 74013   
99Olive HoldenGSBC 74076   
100Sean BerginDuBC 74080   
101Patrick GriffinCommercial 74238   
102Benjamin SlevinDuBC 74241   
103Ronan AllenGSBC 74525   
104Doug ClinchBlackrock 74597   
105Laura GannonGSBC 74613   
106Michael O RourkeCommercial 74620   
107Gillian CroweDuLBC 74623   
108Hugh MohanBlackrock 74656   
109Amy Gill MorleycOMMERCIAL 74857   
110Ian BrennanDuBC 74862   
111Robert BrownBlackrock 74947   
112Alice BeacomPortora 75049   
113Jack BrennanBlackrock 75058   
114Joshua ShirleyPortora 75117   
115Luke NewcombeNeptune 75264   
116Jane ColemanNeptune 75461   
117Kelsey connollyNeptune 75614   
118Hailey MulvaneyCommercial 75626   
119Peter CareyPhoenix 75662   
120Dan CoyneNeptune 75795   
121Emma GloverPortora 75960   
122Callum BakerPortora 8193   
123Charlie LawlessBlackrock 8225   
124Jack CrowleyBlackrock 8233   
125Claire FerrickNeptune 8278   
126Alan ThomasLEBC 8372   
127Conor Blackwell-SmythPortora 845   
128Philip O ConnorUCD 8522   
129Jim MuraneOCDc 8618   
130Elizabeth ClarkePortora 8718   
131Mark DignamBlackrock 8737   
132Jack NayleBlackrock 8768   
133Aoife ByrneNeptune 8787   
134Tom Mc NamaraBlackrock 8890   
135Robert SummersBlackrock 8899   
136Ethen HweyPortora 8917   
137Harry ThompsonNeptune 8992   
138Scott RollandBlackrock 81081   
139Eimear HigginsCommercial 81089   
140Leo MurphyPortora 81197   
141Orlaith KavanaghNeptune 81289   
142Patrick MorreauDuBC 81642   
143Harriet DoyleNeptune 81644   
144Rory MccluskeyBlackrock 81738   
145Cian GriffinT DD 81828   
146Caragh EdwardsCommercial 81911   
147Jonah CartyPortora 8207   
148Siobhan MaxwellCommercial 82489   
149Michael O DonalPortora 82596   
150Mia Jane ElliotPortora 8266   
151Jenny HarringtonCommercial 82612   
152Sophie O HarePortora 8279   
153James O ConnorBlackrock 82759   
154Louis ManahanBlackrock 82894   
155Sophie O DonalPortora 8303   
156Sadhbh O DonovanNeptune 83415   
157Alanna O RourkeCommercial 83928   
158Ava ClarkeNeptune 83982   
159Grainne McNamaraCommercial 84129   
160Jack ButlerNeptune 84160   
161Oisin MackinPortora 84178   
162Patrick HaughBlackrock 84224   
163Harry DohertyBlackrock 8454   
164Elaine GoodeCommercial 84756   
165Olly O TooleCommercial 84776   
166Zoe DonaldsonPortora 85165   
167Orla McConvillePortora 85180   
168Judith UmesiCommercial 8537   
169Elisah TomoneyPortora 85447   
170David McGuaneNeptune 8599   
171Joanna CrawfordPortora 85911   
172Kathleen CurranCommercial 85993   
173Sarah MeehanNeptune 9325   
174Marcus BradshawDuBC 9449   
175David McGinleyPhoenix 9538   
176Tara Gallagher Portora 9613   
177Jane WillisPortora 91048   
178Jack MillorBlackrock 91162   
179Annie RoveNeptune 91244   
180Riccardo HeiBlackrock 91427   
181Carrie Mc SheaPortora 91582   
182Michael WoodhousePortora 91829   
183Jonny WilsonPortora 92085   
184Nathan RodgersPortora 92094   
185Matthew MaquireCommercial 92233   
186Aoife StablesNeptune 92640   
187John Moran  92827   
188Aisling KeoghCommercial 92948   
189Rachel McCaffreyPortora 93277   
190Alex HoltenCommercial 93433   
191Caoimhe McCaffreyPortora 93974   
192Aine Mc GreeshPortora 95498   
193Emily KeanePortora 101343   
194Peter GillespieCommercial 101642   
195Mirian KellyPortora 102399   
196Hannah SharkeyPortora 102749   
197Callum McClementPortora 102926   
198James O NeillCommercial 103124   
199Lydia KhewPortora 103589   
200Katie CassidyPortora 103936   
201Steven RyanBlackrock 105581   
202Liam RaffertyPortora 105739   
203Sophie SherlockPortora 111184   
204Barney DohertyDuBC 112495   
205Charlette BoylePortora 11267   
206Arron O ShaughnessyCommercial 112612   
207Helen ElliotPortora 112876   
208Sinead KinsellaCommercial 114169   
209Derarbhla DillionPortora 125253   
210Brian CroninDuBC 135857   
211Ellie MixPortora 373281   
212Anna McCoolPortora 462974  
Published in Rowing

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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