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Displaying items by tag: Tarbert

#scottishseries – Waterford and Dublin Bay yachts top the leaderboard of class two at Scotland's premier sailing regatta, the Silvers Marine sponsored– Scottish Series at Tarbert, as the annual event enters its final round this afternoon. Rob McConnell's A35 Fools Gold from Waterford Harbour Sailing Club leads IRC Two by a single point from the National Yacht Club's J109 Something Else, skippered by John and Brian Hall. In fourth place overall in the 14–boat fleet is former ICRA National Champion, the J109 Storm, skippered by Pat Kelly of Howth Yacht Club. Full class two results are downloadable below.

Other Irish interest from the Clyde includes Stephen Quinn's Lambay Rules lying third overall in IRC 4 where nine boats are competing.

Here's the latest available PR from the Scottish series after Day Two (Saturday): After a great second day of sailing there's still everything to play for in Silvers Marine Scottish Series. Super Saturday lived up to its name, conditions were challenging with a light southerly blowing 10 – 12 knots, but the sun shone and it was a spectacular day showing Argyll at its best.

There were plenty of thrills and spills and in IRC Class 2 Alistair Shires of Sloop John T became the first casualty of the event, after an onboard incident. Alistair swapped the waters of Loch Fyne for hospital but we're delighted to say he's fine and will be back onboard in the near future.

In IRC Class 1 Silvers Marine Scottish Series main sponsor Jamie McGarry is now leading the table having had a great day on Loch Fyne. Rod Stuart and William Ram's Aurora is just two points adrift of the top spot with Steven Cowie's Zephyr falling to third. With two races tomorrow we're looking forward to some more fierce competition on the water.

IRC 2 sees a change at the top with Sloop John T taking the top spot. The conditions suited the boat perfectly and this coupled with good tactics and handling saw them rewarded. Something Else remains in second and Kevin Aitken in Animal keep a hold of their third spot.

Moving onto the IRC Class 4 and the start of the Crewsaver course and it was Roddy Angus' Trastada who had the best day and really found their pace. They're seeing their hard work paying off following a major boat optimisation. Craig Latimer's Wildebeest V falls to second following an OCS and McVey / Darge and Black's Phoenix rises to third. The racing in this class is very tight and tomorrow's racing will be very interesting.

In CYCA Class 5 Geoff and Norman Howison's Local Hero appears to be in a class of their own. They stay well ahead of Howard Morrison in Enigma and Ian Macdonald's Significant who had an excellent day.

It's still Alan Dunnet's Valhalla of Ashton at the top of CYCA Class 6 leading Stargazer in second, while Andy Malcolm's Nemo was finding pace in third.

CYCA Class 8 Restricted Sail. The Jochr in the pack pulled a lead of two points ahead of Windhound and North Star in third. There are no discards in this class yet and Windhound could still hang in there but will have to discard a retrial.

CYCA Class 9 Restricted Sail sees Stephen Owen in Halcyon hanging on to first while John Roberts' Poppy leapfrogs Clive Reeves' Lyrebird to take third.

Sigma 33 Class and its still Harper and Robinson's Leaky Roof 2 at the top of this tightly grouped section. Gallagher and Bradshaw's Busy Beaver worked hard to take second place from James Miller's Mayrise.

In National One Design Sonata Series Steve Goacher's Eric the Boat took three firsts today to see him dominate this class. Cochrane and Galbraith's Old School, lying in second, secured three seconds while D Matthew's White Magic holds onto third.

Ovington Boats maintain their lead in the VX Class ahead of Jono and Benji Shelly's Robber's Dog, who was let off the lead, in second and Duncan Hepplewhite's Zhik who was barking up the wrong tree today in third.

The J70 Scottish Championships table stays the same with Ian Aitken in boats.com in first, Paul Heys and S Hawthorn's Jacuzzi in second and Christopher Hawforth's Django in third. These boats enjoyed a great day's sailing and Loch Fyne certainly suited them.

It's tight at the top of the Hunter 707 Class with just three points separating the first three boats. M Fleming and D Smith's Rammie leads with Carl Allen's More T Vicar with T Clark and S Parker's Black Sheep in third.

Published in Racing
14th February 2014

Charlie McGibney 1928 – 2014

#rip – The sea, once it casts its spell, will hold you in the net of its wonder forever. A thought that left Dublin native Charlie McGibney spellbound for his 85 years. From a very young age and through all his journeys taken over sea and land throughout his long, distinguished and caring life, Charlie took his final journey this week after he peacefully passed away at his home in Tieraclea, Tarbert, County Kerry on February 13 last.

Born in 1928 and originally from Inchicore, Mr McGibney developed and harnessed his interest and love for the sea over many years culminating in stewardship roles with many of the countries national sailing classes and associations.

Through sailing and the his maritime links and bonds, Mr McGibney is fondly remembered throughout the community, both far and wide with the esteem his presence would hold.

A founder member and former Commodore of Tarbert Island Maritime Club, Mr McGibney held a position of governor of RNLI together with a secretariat role for the Topper International Class Association.

A regional race officer with the Irish Sailing Association, Mr McGibney was very much involved with the Mermaid Class Association. A former commodore and member of Foynes Yacht Club as well as Tralee Bay Sailing Club, the avid boat builder was never far from the sea, even in his later years at his Tarbert home.

Co owner of the class winning Dehler Optima 101 yacht 'Disaray' on Ireland's west coast, Mr McGibney was also a member of the West of Ireland Off Shore Racing Association (WIORA) of which his son Simon is Commodore. He was also involved with and a member of the historic Royal Western Yacht Club of Ireland.

Most notably in 2005, aged 77, the able seaman and mariner was the leader of the assault to the Scottish Sailing Series - Tarbert to Tarbert with three generations involved.

At 85 and the beloved husband of the late Ita, Charlie McGibney peacefully passed away leaving behind a wide circle of family and friends. He is survived by daughter Carol; sons, Thomas, George, Gerard, John Raymond, Damien, Rory and Simon, inlaews, grand children and great children.

It is to the land he may lay, but it is to the sea he will look as Mr McGibney's final resting place is at St Mary's New Cemetery following requiem mass at the adjoining church in Tarbert.

Donations, if desired to the RNLI.

Ar dheis de go raibh an anam.

Published in News Update

#scottishseries – The organisers of  Scotland's bigest sailnig event, the Brewin Dolphin Scottish Series at Tarbert have announced changes on and off the water at this year's event, creating a festival of sailing for competitors and spectators alike. The Clyde Cruising Club has also renewed its appeal for Irish sailors to come to Tarbert, an event Cork sailors have previously won overall.

This year's Brewin Dolphin Scottish Series will take place over the Queen's Jubilee weekend from Friday 1 June to Monday 4 June in Tarbert, Loch Fyne, on Scotland's stunning West Coast, a week later than usual.

The focus is on quality racing with three race areas on the broad waters of the Loch providing racing for IRC classes, One Design classes and CYCA (Scottish) Handicap classes (with and without spinnakers). Those taking part can also expect to see:

New courses for all classes providing variety and alternatives to standard windward/ leeward courses

The introduction of a single daytime Inshore Coastal Race on Sunday 3 June for IRC classes

The Round the Island Race on Sunday 3 June is open to all yachts with CYCA handicaps to join the Scottish Series yachts in CYCA classes to race for the day

In addition, the RS Elite Class Association is hosting the Scottish leg and first of their four Grand Slam Events at the Brewin Dolphin Scottish Series, while the Laser SB3 Class Association will hold their Scottish National Championship during the event.

Organisers also anticipate a hive of activity shoreside by concentrating activities on the north shore of Tarbert, where yachts will be berthed. Amongst various entertainment line-ups, visitors will see the marquee back in full swing. The new shoreside marquee complex will include a bar where competitors can meet, relax and socialise post racing. The daily prize-giving will also be held in the new marquee complex. Competitors and visitors can expect to continue experiencing the hustle and bustle of Tarbert throughout the Jubilee holiday weekend.

John Watson, Commodore of Clyde Cruising Club, commenting on the changes said, "We anticipate this year's Brewin Dolphin Scottish Series to be even more exciting than in previous years. It will be great to see the likes of last year's winner, Jackaroo from IRC 3, returning to defend his trophy and previous winners returning hoping to wrest it back.

"We hope for more than 100 entries and 1000 crew and supporters again this year and think the changes being made to the event structure will promote a festival of sailing on and off the water.

"We would encourage more sailors from across the UK and further afield to consider entering the event and past competitors to continue to return to the stunning waters of Loch Fyne to soak up the wonderful atmosphere Tarbert has to offer."

Published in Racing
Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta and the Brewin Dolphin Scottish Series are jointly promoting reduced entry fees in a tue up between the two big Irish Sea regattas.  50% discounts off entry fees is available for boats entering both events.

"The way this works is that the Clyde Cruising Club are offering a 25% rebate for boats from the 4 Dun Laoghaire Clubs (DMYC, NYC, RIYC, RStGYC) that enter the Brewin Dolphin Scottish series before the expiration of the early bird discount period which expires on April 22nd explained Dun Laoghaire event secretary, Ciara Dowling.

As a reciprocal arrangement the committee of the Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta are offering a discount of 50% from the full entry fee to all boats that enter both regattas. To avail of this, boats must register for the early bird entry fee in the Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta prior to 2 May 2011. Note the 50% discount will be applied to the full entry fee rate and not the early bird rate.

To avail of this arrangement for the Scottish Series contact the Brewin Dolphin Scottish Series office for details, [email protected] 0044141 221 2774.

To avail of this arrangement for the Volvo Dun Laoghaire regatta visit the event website at www.dlregatta.org or email [email protected]

The Scottish Series takes place from 27–30 May and the Dun Laoghaire regatta from July 7th–10th 2011.

In a further boost for Dun Laoghaire sailors heading north the feeder race from Bangor to Tarbert has been re-instated.

Troon and Largs Marinas are offering competitors berthing rate discounts around Scottish Series.

Competitors from Scotland coming to Dun Laoghaire are reminded that the entry fee to the regatta includes free berthing for the duration of the event.

The official Notice of Race and Online Entry are now available at www.dlregatta.org

Published in Volvo Regatta
Today private client investment manager, Brewin Dolphin, announces its continued commitment to sponsor the Scottish Series, Scotland's premier sailing regatta, in 2011.

The Scottish Series has thrived during Brewin Dolphin's eleven year sponsorship growing awareness and numbers over the period. The event, which generates around £1 million each year for the local economy, has been running for over 30 years and attracts over 1,200 competitors to the picturesque Loch Fyne, over the May holiday weekend.

Commenting on the decision, Jamie Matheson, chairman of Brewin Dolphin, said, "We are pleased to announce our continued sponsorship of the world renowned Scottish Series. Our name has become synonymous with the event and we are delighted to be able to support it for yet another year."

Howard Morrison, Commodore of Clyde Cruising Club, event organisers, added, "The Scottish Series is a key event in the sailing calendar and we would like to thank Brewin Dolphin for their continued sponsorship of the Scottish Series. The funding will not only help develop the event, but also benefit sailing across Scotland."

Brewin Dolphin also sponsors the under 16 and under 18 youth rugby competition, the Scottish Schools Cup, which sees over 4,500 children taking part each year. As lead sponsors of both competitions, Brewin Dolphin has been able to support the drive to increase participation in both sports, whilst communicating with its target audiences.

Published in Racing

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

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