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Displaying items by tag: Tracy Edwards

The Irish Film Institute in Dublin joins the list of locations for a special screening of Alex Holmes’ Tracy Edwards documentary Maiden on Thursday 7 March.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Cork’s Gate Cinemas will also host the preview followed by a satellite link Q&A with Tracy Edwards and some special guests.

Edwards made history as the skipper of the first ever all-female crew to enter the Whitbread Round the World Race, which became the Volvo Ocean Race and is now simply The Ocean Race after its recent change of ownership.

Maiden opens at the IFI on Friday 8 March. Tickets are available for the special preview from 6pm on Thursday 7 March from the IFI box office.

Published in Volvo Ocean Race

Cork’s Gate Cinemas will stage a special screening of the new Tracy Edwards documentary Maiden, followed by a satellite link Q&A with Edwards herself, on Thursday 7 March.

Edwards was a 24-year-old cook on charter boats when in 1989 she became the skipper of the first ever all-female crew to enter the Whitbread Round the World Race, the precursor to the Volvo Ocean Race.

Maiden charts Edwards’ struggle against the odds — facing chauvinism in the yachting community, and rejection from sponsors — to put a team on the water.

Sailing a second-hand yacht financed by remortgaging her home, Edwards and her crew showed the world that women sailors were capable of doing everything their male counterparts could.

And their legacy can be seen more recently both in the all-woman Team SCA in the 2014-15 VOR, and the most recent edition that encouraged mixed crews. Indeed, Olympians Carolijn Brouwer and Marie Riou were part of the crew on the race-winning Dongfeng Race Team.

Maiden opens on Friday 8 March but tickets go on sale today (Friday 1 February) for the special preview screening in Cork the night before. Tickets go on sale today with details to follow.

Published in Volvo Ocean Race

Yachtswoman, Tracy Edwards MBE, is reuniting her legendary ‘Maiden’ crew for the first time since 1990 when they became the first all-female team to sail around the world and into the record books. Th crew includes Dun Laoghaire sailor Angela Heath (neé Farrell) from the Royal St. George Yacht Club.

The crew gained acclaim for their successes in the Whitbread Round The World Race in 1989-90, where they defied expectations and shattered glass ceilings; setting the best result for a British boat since 1977, which has remained unbeaten to this day. Their incredible story is currently being turned into a new documentary, produced by New Black Films. In honour of their reunion, the renowned sailors were treated to a private screening preview of the film currently in production, among family and friends at BAFTA in London.

A story about guts, courage and determination, the documentary is set to chronicle the team’s 167-day, 32,018-mile journey around the globe, where they overcame icebergs, a tornado and five days without food. Their achievement shattered stereotypes, broke records and paved the way for women in sport and beyond. Tracy Edwards MBE, Maiden’s Skipper, said:“Today, for the first time since the end of the Whitbread, the Maiden crew are reunited. We spent nine months together during the race and shared a truly unique experience and bond. It has been wonderful to get back together and share our stories and enjoy watching a preview of the forthcoming documentary. “Back in 1989 many people did not believe that a group of women sailors could take on such a notorious challenge, and many wrote off our chances. We not only completed the race but did so in an impressive time, coming second in our class, ahead of many all-male crews.

Our accomplishment reached beyond the world of sailing –showing that with the right support and plenty of belief, women can do anything. Over the past 30 years, the opportunities available to women have been evolving for the better. However, there is still so much to be done. Thanks to the generous support of HRH Princess Haya’s global initiative: ‘Anything is Possible’, which supports and inspires the best in people, Maiden will set sail again this September, promoting and campaigning for educational equality across the globe.

We hope the next chapter in Maiden’s story will inspire and empower a new generation of young girls to fulfil their dreams and reach their potential.” Maiden will set sail later this year from Southampton to Jordan on the first leg of her three-year world tour raising awareness for girls’ education

Published in Offshore
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Initially conceived 30 years ago, the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan has renewed its partnership with round-the-world yachtswoman Tracy Edwards and her iconic boat Maiden. In 1990, Edwards made the history books by leading the first all-female crew to the finish line of the Whitbread Round the World Race (now the Volvo Ocean Race) with Maiden as the star of the show proudly displaying the royal crown of the Jordanian family on her sail.

In 2017 Maiden will be restored to her former glory, Jordanian colours and all, and will embark on a new worthy venture to carry on the legacy started in the 1980s by Ms Edwards, with the support of His Majesty King Hussein of Jordan. A pioneer of the times, His Majesty King Hussein believed in Edwards’ vision for a truly empowering female-only crew to sail around the world, breaking preconceptions and records at the same time.

Already 8 years old by the time of the race, Maiden and her 12-strong crew helped to inspire women to take up sailing and challenge the perception of what women were capable of, by winning two legs of the race and coming second overall in her class.

The yacht was recently discovered by Edwards, falling into disrepair in the Indian Ocean, and the Jordan Tourism Board has been a key advocate for ensuring this iconic boat is restored to her former glory and used as a vessel for inspiration and innovation.

Through a combination of crowdfunding and sponsorship, Maiden will undergo a huge restoration over the coming months. Maiden will then have a new purpose with The Maiden Factor, a not-for profit organisation which will work with charities such as I am Girl, Just a Drop, Girl Up and The Girl’s Network. Maiden as an Ambassador for The Maiden Factor will sail the globe promoting the agenda of education for girls and raise funds for these associated charities as well as Maiden Education.

Filming has begun for a one-off TV series which will follow the rescue and restoration of Maiden and also the selection and training of a new crew. The original Maiden crew from 1989/90 will deliver the grand dame of sailing to London in September 2017 for her re-launch. Celebrations will include sailing under Tower Bridge and handing Maiden over to her new crew. Crew trials will test sailing skills on the water in the UK and in Jordan the stamina and teamwork of the hopefuls will be tested along the magnificent Jordan Trail which stretches 650 km from Um Quais in the north of Jordan to Aqaba in the south.

Filming is already underway to accompany a documentary about Maiden’s completion of the 1989/90 Whitbread Round the World Race, which will be aired on prime-time television and have a premiere in Leicester Square in time for Maiden’s triumphant reveal in London in summer 2017. Following her London film premiere Maiden will attend the start of the 2017/18 Volvo Ocean Race in Alicante after which she will sail to Jordan for the winter.

Of the project Tracy Edwards MBE said, “Maiden is an inspiration and I want her to engage with people all over the world. She is an icon of female empowerment, the ability and will to succeed against all odds and that’s something I want to harness and use to inspire young girls everywhere to achieve their full potential. We must ensure that the basic human right of every girl is to have an education, a conviction shared by His Majesty King Hussein of Jordan, who was the first person help me on my initial quest to get an all-female crew to sail around the world. It would be an understatement to say that I was delighted that the Kingdom of Jordan under the reign of his son, His Majesty King Abdullah II of Jordan, has stepped in to help me on my new mission to inspire a whole new generation and make Maiden a vessel for peace and education across the world.”

Dr. Abed Al Razzaq Arabiyat, managing director of the Jordan Tourism Board said, “When Tracy Edwards MBE told us of her new mission we were only too delighted to help. She has helped to inspire so many people and her new vision is something that aligns perfectly with our own in Jordan. Empowering women, championing girl’s education and inspiring a generation is such a powerful message; it is an honour to be involved in her project and we look forward to welcoming Maiden and her inspirational crew to Jordan in 2017.

Published in Volvo Ocean Race
Tagged under

#Offshore - Tracy Edwards - who led an all-woman team to victory 24 years ago in the precursor to the Volvo Ocean Race - has launched a bid to recover her race-winning boat Maiden after it was discovered in serious disrepair on an island in the Indian Ocean.

The 58ft offshore racing yacht was already 21 years old when Edwards and crew - including Irish sailor Angela Farrell - sailed her ahead of the pack in the 1990 Whitbread Round the World Race.

But since that time Maiden changed hands between successive owners and her whereabouts were lost.

Now Mail Online reports that Edwards has located Maiden abandoned in the mid-ocean island marina, she intends to return her to British waters for restoration.

But first she needs to raise £50,000 (€62,655) to lift and transport her from the Indian Ocean, and she's already bagged support from big names such as transatlantic record-breaker Richard Branson and Fastnet Race veteran Simon Le Bon of Duran Duran.

Mail Online has more on the story HERE.

Published in Offshore

Ireland's Offshore Renewable Energy

Because of Ireland's location at the Atlantic edge of the EU, it has more offshore energy potential than most other countries in Europe. The conditions are suitable for the development of the full range of current offshore renewable energy technologies.

Offshore Renewable Energy FAQs

Offshore renewable energy draws on the natural energy provided by wind, wave and tide to convert it into electricity for industry and domestic consumption.

Offshore wind is the most advanced technology, using fixed wind turbines in coastal areas, while floating wind is a developing technology more suited to deeper water. In 2018, offshore wind provided a tiny fraction of global electricity supply, but it is set to expand strongly in the coming decades into a USD 1 trillion business, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA). It says that turbines are growing in size and in power capacity, which in turn is "delivering major performance and cost improvements for offshore wind farms".

The global offshore wind market grew nearly 30% per year between 2010 and 2018, according to the IEA, due to rapid technology improvements, It calculated that about 150 new offshore wind projects are in active development around the world. Europe in particular has fostered the technology's development, led by Britain, Germany and Denmark, but China added more capacity than any other country in 2018.

A report for the Irish Wind Energy Assocation (IWEA) by the Carbon Trust – a British government-backed limited company established to accelerate Britain's move to a low carbon economy - says there are currently 14 fixed-bottom wind energy projects, four floating wind projects and one project that has yet to choose a technology at some stage of development in Irish waters. Some of these projects are aiming to build before 2030 to contribute to the 5GW target set by the Irish government, and others are expected to build after 2030. These projects have to secure planning permission, obtain a grid connection and also be successful in a competitive auction in the Renewable Electricity Support Scheme (RESS).

The electricity generated by each turbine is collected by an offshore electricity substation located within the wind farm. Seabed cables connect the offshore substation to an onshore substation on the coast. These cables transport the electricity to land from where it will be used to power homes, farms and businesses around Ireland. The offshore developer works with EirGrid, which operates the national grid, to identify how best to do this and where exactly on the grid the project should connect.

The new Marine Planning and Development Management Bill will create a new streamlined system for planning permission for activity or infrastructure in Irish waters or on the seabed, including offshore wind farms. It is due to be published before the end of 2020 and enacted in 2021.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE.

There are a number of companies aiming to develop offshore wind energy off the Irish coast and some of the larger ones would be ESB, SSE Renewables, Energia, Statkraft and RWE. Is there scope for community involvement in offshore wind? The IWEA says that from the early stages of a project, the wind farm developer "should be engaging with the local community to inform them about the project, answer their questions and listen to their concerns". It says this provides the community with "the opportunity to work with the developer to help shape the final layout and design of the project". Listening to fishing industry concerns, and how fishermen may be affected by survey works, construction and eventual operation of a project is "of particular concern to developers", the IWEA says. It says there will also be a community benefit fund put in place for each project. It says the final details of this will be addressed in the design of the RESS (see below) for offshore wind but it has the potential to be "tens of millions of euro over the 15 years of the RESS contract". The Government is also considering the possibility that communities will be enabled to invest in offshore wind farms though there is "no clarity yet on how this would work", the IWEA says.

Based on current plans, it would amount to around 12 GW of offshore wind energy. However, the IWEA points out that is unlikely that all of the projects planned will be completed. The industry says there is even more significant potential for floating offshore wind off Ireland's west coast and the Programme for Government contains a commitment to develop a long-term plan for at least 30 GW of floating offshore wind in our deeper waters.

There are many different models of turbines. The larger a turbine, the more efficient it is in producing electricity at a good price. In choosing a turbine model the developer will be conscious of this ,but also has to be aware the impact of the turbine on the environment, marine life, biodiversity and visual impact. As a broad rule an offshore wind turbine will have a tip-height of between 165m and 215m tall. However, turbine technology is evolving at a rapid rate with larger more efficient turbines anticipated on the market in the coming years.

 

The Renewable Electricity Support Scheme is designed to support the development of renewable energy projects in Ireland. Under the scheme wind farms and solar farms compete against each other in an auction with the projects which offer power at the lowest price awarded contracts. These contracts provide them with a guaranteed price for their power for 15 years. If they obtain a better price for their electricity on the wholesale market they must return the difference to the consumer.

Yes. The first auction for offshore renewable energy projects is expected to take place in late 2021.

Cost is one difference, and technology is another. Floating wind farm technology is relatively new, but allows use of deeper water. Ireland's 50-metre contour line is the limit for traditional bottom-fixed wind farms, and it is also very close to population centres, which makes visibility of large turbines an issue - hence the attraction of floating structures Do offshore wind farms pose a navigational hazard to shipping? Inshore fishermen do have valid concerns. One of the first steps in identifying a site as a potential location for an offshore wind farm is to identify and assess the level of existing marine activity in the area and this particularly includes shipping. The National Marine Planning Framework aims to create, for the first time, a plan to balance the various kinds of offshore activity with the protection of the Irish marine environment. This is expected to be published before the end of 2020, and will set out clearly where is suitable for offshore renewable energy development and where it is not - due, for example, to shipping movements and safe navigation.

YEnvironmental organisations are concerned about the impact of turbines on bird populations, particularly migrating birds. A Danish scientific study published in 2019 found evidence that larger birds were tending to avoid turbine blades, but said it didn't have sufficient evidence for smaller birds – and cautioned that the cumulative effect of farms could still have an impact on bird movements. A full environmental impact assessment has to be carried out before a developer can apply for planning permission to develop an offshore wind farm. This would include desk-based studies as well as extensive surveys of the population and movements of birds and marine mammals, as well as fish and seabed habitats. If a potential environmental impact is identified the developer must, as part of the planning application, show how the project will be designed in such a way as to avoid the impact or to mitigate against it.

A typical 500 MW offshore wind farm would require an operations and maintenance base which would be on the nearby coast. Such a project would generally create between 80-100 fulltime jobs, according to the IWEA. There would also be a substantial increase to in-direct employment and associated socio-economic benefit to the surrounding area where the operation and maintenance hub is located.

The recent Carbon Trust report for the IWEA, entitled Harnessing our potential, identified significant skills shortages for offshore wind in Ireland across the areas of engineering financial services and logistics. The IWEA says that as Ireland is a relatively new entrant to the offshore wind market, there are "opportunities to develop and implement strategies to address the skills shortages for delivering offshore wind and for Ireland to be a net exporter of human capital and skills to the highly competitive global offshore wind supply chain". Offshore wind requires a diverse workforce with jobs in both transferable (for example from the oil and gas sector) and specialist disciplines across apprenticeships and higher education. IWEA have a training network called the Green Tech Skillnet that facilitates training and networking opportunities in the renewable energy sector.

It is expected that developing the 3.5 GW of offshore wind energy identified in the Government's Climate Action Plan would create around 2,500 jobs in construction and development and around 700 permanent operations and maintenance jobs. The Programme for Government published in 2020 has an enhanced target of 5 GW of offshore wind which would create even more employment. The industry says that in the initial stages, the development of offshore wind energy would create employment in conducting environmental surveys, community engagement and development applications for planning. As a site moves to construction, people with backgrounds in various types of engineering, marine construction and marine transport would be recruited. Once the site is up and running , a project requires a team of turbine technicians, engineers and administrators to ensure the wind farm is fully and properly maintained, as well as crew for the crew transfer vessels transporting workers from shore to the turbines.

The IEA says that today's offshore wind market "doesn't even come close to tapping the full potential – with high-quality resources available in most major markets". It estimates that offshore wind has the potential to generate more than 420 000 Terawatt hours per year (TWh/yr) worldwide – as in more than 18 times the current global electricity demand. One Terawatt is 114 megawatts, and to put it in context, Scotland it has a population a little over 5 million and requires 25 TWh/yr of electrical energy.

Not as advanced as wind, with anchoring a big challenge – given that the most effective wave energy has to be in the most energetic locations, such as the Irish west coast. Britain, Ireland and Portugal are regarded as most advanced in developing wave energy technology. The prize is significant, the industry says, as there are forecasts that varying between 4000TWh/yr to 29500TWh/yr. Europe consumes around 3000TWh/year.

The industry has two main umbrella organisations – the Irish Wind Energy Association, which represents both onshore and offshore wind, and the Marine Renewables Industry Association, which focuses on all types of renewable in the marine environment.

©Afloat 2020

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