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National Maritime College of Ireland Steers a Course for Superyacht Success

26th September 2017
Superyacht Air, a 265–foot Feadship, during her Kinsale visit in June 2015. The yacht also visited Kinsale again in 2016 and is part of a growing fleet of superyachts coming to Irish waters Superyacht Air, a 265–foot Feadship, during her Kinsale visit in June 2015. The yacht also visited Kinsale again in 2016 and is part of a growing fleet of superyachts coming to Irish waters Photo: John McDonald

In a move to broaden the base of its operations even further, and capitalise on the ever growing global Superyacht market, the National Maritime College of Ireland (NMCI) has made significant investments in developing its course programmes for this exciting sector. That investment paid dividends as the College’s new Superyacht Division has secured approval from the Private Yachting Association (PYA) to complement its existing programmes for deck and engine crew right up to Masters Qualification.

Joey Meen, PYA Director, CEO GUEST Programme said,“We are delighted to announce that the NMCI is now a GUEST accredited Training Provider offering the introduction levels of the GUEST programme. NMCI have easily met the required standards for approval under the PYA GUEST Guidelines offering huge value to the students with their professional facilities and qualified trainers.

NMCI staff and trainers are committed to ensuring that their students training for interior yacht crew positions have the continued support and relevant education they need. The training offered will give confidence and skills sets to enhance individual careers as well as bringing value to the interior departments on-board.

NMCI are now one of the 20 plus GUEST accredited training providers worldwide, who will be working with us to maintain standards of education and learning outcomes for the students’ investment. They are very much welcomed into the GUEST entity and we look forward to working with them in the years to come."

Jim O’Byrne, Head of NMCI Services continued, “This recent PYA approval was the final link in the chain to enable us to offer qualified Irish citizens out in to the Private Yacht arena, and to facilitate the existing cohort of seafarers currently enjoying employment in this sector”

CIT President, Dr Barry O’Connor, congratulated the team at the NMCI for once again securing international recognition and validation for the high standards and on-going relevance of the education and training programmes being offered. The NMCI has once again identified, and effectively responded to, the needs of a growing niche area in the maritime sector. Such successes secure the positive future of the NMCI and sustain the established reputation of Cork Institute of Technology as a responsive and agile institution identifying and serving specific evolving needs of enterprise and of communities generally.

Published in Cork Harbour
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