Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: BIM

Five up and coming young chefs, aged between 21 and 24, have been successfully awarded places on BIM’s Taste the Atlantic Ambassador Programme, an exciting initiative created by Bord Iascaigh Mhara in partnership with Chef Network to drive awareness of the provenance of Irish seafood among young and aspiring chefs. Working with Chef Network, nominations were sought from around the country and five candidates have been selected following a written submission and interview process.

The five Ambassadors will now take part in a three-month programme including mentoring from some of our premium seafood producers along the Taste the Atlantic, A Seafood Journey! trail and workshops with Master fishmonger, Hal Dawson and Michelin-starred chef, JP McMahon.

Taste the Atlantic, A Seafood Journey! was developed by BIM in partnership with Fáilte Ireland and the trail, sweeping from Malin Head, Co. Donegal to Kinsale, Co. Cork, showcases the incredible range of seafood producers and visitor attractions along the Wild Atlantic Way to visitors.

Kicking off the Ambassadors programme is a producer visit to Kelly Oysters in South Galway, who will introduce them to a third-generation shellfish business that exports around the Globe. That afternoon they will participate in a culinary masterclass on Irish seafood with Chef JP McMahon. The group will then visit Killary Harbour in Co. Galway and will learn about mussel farming and Seafood Tourism directly from Killary Fjord Shellfish, this will be followed by a trip to DK Connemara Oysters where the Ambassadors will learn about oyster farming and the storied history of oyster production in Ballinakill bay.

Speaking after the young chefs were announced, Mairtín Walsh, BIM said, “As a member of the interview panel I was struck by the energy and knowledge all of the nominees. We genuinely had a tough job selecting only five chefs, but we can say with confidence they will be vibrant and vociferous ambassadors for premium Irish seafood into the future. We wish them the very best of luck on their seafood journey!”

Executive Chef at Harvey’s Point, Donegal and Chef Network Advisory Council member Chris McMenamin, who also took part in the selection interviews, commented: “This programme is a fantastic chance to show young chefs the wealth of seafood out there on the Wild Atlantic Way; to get to know the producers, understand how it is produced, and get excited about working with it. We would like to see more local seafood featured on menus and these chefs can help champion that and inspire others. At the same time, the programme will greatly expand their knowledge and skills and contribute to their professional development. It’s been really refreshing to meet the candidates and we are genuinely excited to work with the five selected ambassadors over the coming months”.

The young chefs hail from all over the country, Sarah Jane Browne, originally from Kerry, is now Chef/ Manager of Time & Tide in Annagry, Co. Donegal. Jake Kennedy is from Co. Wicklow and is Chef de Partie (Fish Section), Glovers Alley, Dublin. Kevin King is Senior Sous Chef, Connemara Sands Beach Hotel and Spa, Ballyconneely, Co. Galway and is from Clifden. Hailing from Salvador de Bahia, Brazil, Lucas Serpa Maciel Lisboa is Junior Chef de Partie, Bunnyconnellan Coastal Restaurant, Myrtleville, Co. Cork and Andrew Zeppa is Commis Chef at The Yacht Pub & Upper Deck Restaurant, Clontarf, Co. Dublin.

The mentoring programme is underway and is being supported by the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund

Meet the Young Chefs!

Sarah Jane Browne, Chef/Manager, Time & Tide Café. (Annagry, Co. Donegal)

Sarah is originally from Kerry but is now Chef/Manager at Time & Tide Café in Annagry, Co. Donegal. Sarah has studied and honed her culinary skills in CIT and LYIT and has extensive experience working in tourism including at the world-famous Molls Gap in Kerry. Sarah is from a dairy farming background is a passionate believer that sustainability in food production is critical and that chefs and producers are key stakeholders in the future of sustainable food production. Sarah wants to learn more about sustainable seafood production and bring learnings back to her work in Co. Donegal.

Jake Kennedy, Chef de Partie (Fish Section), Glovers Alley (Dublin)

Jake is from Wicklow and is very keen on all things fish and marine related. Jake has been developing his fish skills in Glovers Alley. Jake is also a keen sport fisherman, taking every opportunity to get involved in fishing whether in Ireland or the Canaries or Singapore. Jake is a graduate of DIT and cites Nathan Outlaw and Josh Niland as his inspirations. Jake will be very much at home on the shore and on boats with Taste the Atlantic producers.

Kevin King, Senior Sous Chef, Connemara Sands Beach Hotel and Spa. (Ballyconneely, Co. Galway)

Kevin is from Clifden, Co. Galway and grew up around fishing where he has fished for lobster and crab for years. He is extremely passionate about sustainability and wild food, where he forages daily to further champion local, organic produce within the Connemara Sands menu. Kevin has worked and completed stagiaires in high end restaurants and hotels in Connemara, Galway and the UK including The Black Swan at Oldstead and The Oakroom at Adare Manor. Kevin is ambitious and is starting on an MSc in Food Business and Innovation in UCC. Kevin is already familiar with some Taste the Atlantic producers but wants to learn much more.

Lucas Serpa Maciel Lisboa, Junior Chef de Partie, Bunnyconnellan Coastal Restaurant. (Myrtleville, Co. Cork)

Lucas is from Salvador de Bahia in Brazil a city with great seafood cuisine. Lucas developed his interest in food in childhood, sharing meals with his family. ''In my family sharing a meal was the way that we choose to celebrate, so, my relationship with the kitchen has this powerful feeling attached. '' Lucas came to Ireland to challenge himself and to broaden his range of culinary skills and techniques. Lucas wants to bring the diverse flavours and techniques of historic Salvador de Bahia to the Taste the Atlantic producers to create a new and exciting fusion.

Andrew Zeppa, Chef de Partie, The Yacht Pub & Upper Deck Restaurant, (Clontarf, Co. Dublin)

Andrew is from Dublin and has been working at the Yacht Pub and Upper Deck Restaurant in Clontarf for several years. A high-quality seafood offering at the Upper Deck Restaurant has helped Andrew develop a strong interest in seafood and the culinary skills required to bring out the best in the product. Andrew wants to get out and about on the water with Taste the Atlantic producers and bring a bit of the west coast back to Clontarf, Andrew is keen to draw on his Italian heritage to create interesting new dishes.

Published in Fishing
Tagged under

‘Stories from the sea - cultural value of Ireland’s coastal communities’ is the title of a free webinar hosted by Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) next Wednesday 14 July.

Ireland has a rich maritime history with coastal communities that have been shaped by the activities of small-scale fisheries.

While an economic value has been put on these activities, their influence on social and cultural life in Ireland is more difficult to measure and as a result, it is an often-overlooked aspect of fisheries management.

Ireland’s seafood development agency is bringing together an expert panel of speakers who will share stories from the sea and promise to change the way we think about the socio-cultural capital values of small-scale fisheries in Ireland.

The webinar takes place from 3pm to 4.30pm on Wednesday 14 July and is free to attend but registration is essential. Visit the Eventbrite page for to book your place.

Agenda

Moderator - Richard Curtin, Senior Economist, BIM

15:00 - Introduction to project, Richard Curtin, BIM

15:05 - Welcome, Jim O'Toole, CEO BIM

15:10 - Oceans of Wisdom – insights the Irish language gives us into the richness of our coastline - Manchán Magan

15.20 - The Seine Fishing Heritage of South Kerry and West Cork, with a particular focus on the role of women - Mary McGillicuddy

15.30 - The heritage of community labour and the realities of economic efficiency - John B Roney

15:40 - Dúchas - Séainín Johnson

15:50 - Panel discussion

16:30 - ENDS

Panel Biographies

Séainín Johnson is a third-generation fisherman who has operated off the west coast of Kerry for 55 years. Séainín first started fishing in traditional currachs in the 1960s before progressing to own a 40ft boat in the late 1970s. Séainín grew up in the fishing and farming community in the Gaeltacht area of Baile na nGall where he lives, is married to Anne and has five children. Having been immersed in the Irish language and his local community all his life, he is going to speak on the topics of culture, language and fishing.

Manchán Magan is a writer and documentary maker. He has written books in Irish and English on his travels in Africa, India and South America and two novels. His most recent book, Thirty-Two Words For Field, explores the insights the Irish language offers into the landscape, psyche and heritage of Ireland. He writes occasionally for The Irish Times, and presents The Almanac of Ireland podcast for RTÉ Radio 1 about the heritage and culture of Ireland. He has presented dozens of documentaries on issues of world culture for TG4, RTÉ and the Travel Channel. Having been brought up in Dublin, with long periods spent in the West Kerry Gaeltacht of Corca Dhuibhne, Manchán now lives in the midlands, in a grass-roofed house near Lough Lene, Co Westmeath, surrounded by his oak trees, and with bees and hens for company. www.manchan.com

Mary McGillicuddy: From childhood, Mary had a basic awareness of South Kerry’s seine boat fishing tradition because of direct family involvement in the early 1900s. However, little written material was readily accessible about the topic. The most visible records were locally displayed reprints of old Lawrence black and white photographs which documented women processing fish on quaysides in Kerry. This visual evidence prompted Mary to focus on this subject for her MA thesis in Local History in UL in 2008. She originally studied Media Studies in New York and later completed a BA in Sociology and History and a Diploma in Rural Develoment in UCC and holds an MSc in Environmental and Development Education from South Bank University, London. Based in Kerry, she worked for over 20 years in a development education centre in Tralee.

Dr John B Roney is Professor of History at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut and co-director of its Dingle campus in Co Kerry. He is also the current president of the New England region of the American Conference for Irish Studies and is on the board of directors of the John Moriarty Institute for Ecology and Spirituality. In addition to research and publication on cultural and intellectual topics in Irish history, Dr Roney has developed an interest in environmental history, with a specific focus on the cultural heritage of coastal communities on the west of Ireland. He regularly teaches a course, ‘Coastal Communities in the North Atlantic from Viking Age to the Present’, as well as Irish, French and Dutch history.

Published in Coastal Notes
Tagged under

The Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine Charlie McConalogue has accepted a business case from Bord Iascaigh Mhara’s (BIM) for the development of a new Sea Survival Training Unit at BIM’s National Fisheries Training College in Greencastle, Co Donegal. The Department is working with BIM on how the project will be delivered as early as possible. Speaking during a visit to the Greencastle College, Minister McConalogue said:

“I am delighted to announce today that I have approved a business case from BIM for the provision of a dedicated Sea Survival Unit at the Greencastle fisheries training college. The project involves an above ground pool, upgraded modern changing rooms together with a new navigation simulator and a radio suite for the new centre.”

The total estimated cost of the proposed BIM project will be approximately €1.1m. The Minister continued: “The new Sea Survival Unit at Greencastle will significantly build upon the professional level of maritime training which BIM currently offers to the Irish seafood sector. It will also facilitate development and expansion of BIMs training programmes over the coming years. The provision of a fit-for-purpose pool, together with new, modern training equipment will also result in a high-quality national asset that will deliver a centre of excellence to support essential training for fishers, providing the instruction needed to equip seafarers with current and future skills needed to pursue varied careers in the seafood sector.”

Following confirmation by BIM that the new facility will be among the nation’s only ‘Green energy pools’ the Minister added: “I welcome BIMs proposal to fit a “green pool” by including an appropriate renewal energy source to fund the pumps, heating and filtration system which is in keeping with national policy and ensure that running costs will be sustainable for the future. I am delighted that the Sustainable Energy Authority Ireland (SEAI) will be assisting BIM in ensuring the delivery of a sustainable facility including the provision of necessary advice prior to the procurement process. “

In response to the Minister’s announcement that the project is under active consideration subject to availability of funding, Jim O’Toole, CEO BIM said: “Safety is an essential part of training for all those embarking on a career in the seafood sector who intend working at sea. With 2,030 registered fishing vessels in Ireland and 2,881 adults working in the fisheries sector, it is important that we continue to prioritise the provision of high quality safety training for the crew of vessels. This new facility will encourage those who wish to pursue life long rewarding careers in the seafood industry and most importantly ensure that safety at sea and on the water is prioritised”.

The Minister concluded; “I am confident that this project when completed will provide a high quality training facility which will ultimately help to save lives and support this important industry which is so crucial to the economies of coastal communities in particular. My ambition is to have the facility fully operational by the end of the first half of 2022”

Published in Fishing
Tagged under

Ireland’s seafood sector remains “resilient” in spite of Brexit and the Covid-19 pandemic, Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) says.

Its annual Business of Seafood report says that Ireland’s seafood economy declined in 2020, with a drop of 12% (-€142million) compared to 2019, giving a total value of €1.1 billion.

It says this was driven mainly by a reduction of 18% in domestic consumption due to the closure of the food-service sector with additional impacts of a 17% reduction (-€44 million) in private investment and an 8% decline (-€50 million) in exports.

Global markets faced severe disruption from the Covid-19 pandemic, and when added to the continued uncertainty from the UK’s departure from the EU, this made for challenging trading conditions.

It says that despite these challenges the seafood sector remained resilient and adapted to the disruption the market faced. While there was a decrease of 18% in domestic consumption to €406 million, mainly due to a fall in sales in foodservice, this was somewhat offset by a 6% increase (€18m) in retail sales.

There was also a reduction in private investment to €213 million (-17%) reflecting the uncertainty in the markets leading to cautious activity from many seafood businesses. There was also a decline in our seafood balance of trade (exports – imports) which fell by €28 million (-10%) to €263 million.

Overall investment in the sector was €416 million, equivalent to 39% of seafood GDP, a slight increase compared to 2019, underlining the importance of strong public sector support through times of economic turbulence.

Ireland imported some €327 million euro worth of fish last year, with €188million coming from Britain.

While exports of Irish seafood to European and Asian markets were hit, Ireland’s mackerel landings drove an 87 per cent increase in the value of exports to Africa and a 43 per cent increase to the Middle East.

The assessment states that the total value of Ireland’s seafood economy in 2020 was just under €1.1 billion - a decrease of 12% (-€142million) on 2019.

BIM says this was “driven mainly by the severe disruption in global markets”, while “the continued uncertainty of the UK’s departure from the EU made for challenging trading conditions”.

“Despite the pandemic, and even with reduced demand in the foodservice sector, employment in the seafood sector remained stable in 2020,”it says, with over 16,000 employed directly and indirectly in the seafood industry.

Employment remained “high” in coastal regions, generating “significant socioeconomic value in these areas”, particularly Donegal, Cork, Galway-Clare and along the east coast.

“Undoubtedly 2020 was a challenging year for the seafood sector but yet again the sector displayed its ability to adjust and refocus to the available market opportunities,”Minister for Marine Charlie McConalogue said.

“The Irish seafood sector sells a lot of its produce to foodservice markets in Europe and in Asia which experienced lengthy lockdowns significantly impacting sales,”BIM chief executive Jim O’Toole said.

He said the industry showed “great agility” during the year, switching where possible from supplying hospitality to supplying the retail market and online sales.

Domestic consumption amounted to €406m, down 18%, exports-imports were valued at €263m, down 10% and private investment was valued at €213, down 17%, BIM says.

However, there was an increase of 9% on government investment – an increase to €203m.

Overall investment in the sector was €416 million, equivalent to 39% of seafood GDP, a slight increase compared to 2019, it says.

Some 346 million euro worth in landings was recorded in Irish ports last year, with Killybegs, Co Donegal recording 112 million euro and Castletownbere, Co Cork, recording 104 million euro worth of landings.

Some 406 million euro in domestic sales value involved 316 million euro in retail and 90 million euro in “food service”.

Top selling species were salmon at €120m and cod at€46m, and the main export markets were the EU, valued at €321m, Britain at €93m and Africa at €75m

The volume of seafood produced by the Irish seafood sector surpassed 220,000 tonnes with a value of €394m, it says.

While less than 20% of this volume was produced by the aquaculture sector, it contributed 46% of the total value.

Species by value:

  • Salmon €127m (+13%)
  • Irish Rock Oysters €37m (-19%)
  • Seabed Cultured Mussels €7m (-15%)
  • Rope mussels €6m (-11%)
  • Other finfish €2m (+12%)
  • Other shellfish €1m (-6%)

By volume:

  • Salmon 13,400 (+14%)
  • Irish Rock Oysters 9,000 (-14%)
  • Seabed Cultured Mussels 4,400 (-11%)
  • Rope mussels 10,300 (-1%)
  • Other finfish 600 (-1%)
  • Other shellfish 300 (-1%)
Published in Fishing
Tagged under

BIM, Ireland's Seafood Development Agency, are hosting a Rainwater Harvesting Webinar for Irish Seafood Processing businesses to examine the benefits of adopting rainwater harvesting systems on site and provide opportunities for improving water management and reducing water costs.

The free webinar will take place on Thursday 25th March at 13.00 and all seafood processors are welcome to register their attendance.

The event is being hosted by BIM, in conjunction with our Water Stewardship Programme partners, Central Solutions and is just one of a series of sustainable resource management webinars which BIM’s Green Seafood Business Programme will be hosting over the coming year. Other areas addressed under the Programme are the efficient management of energy, waste, and emissions.

Speaking in advance of the event, Martina O’Brien, Green Programme Co-ordinator, BIM said, “Water is a shared natural resource and is essential to everything we do in the seafood sector. However, its supply is limited, and this will pose a major challenge in the coming decade. We must act now to ensure we understand the potential risks to seafood businesses and identify sustainable solutions to this significant issue. This Rainwater Harvesting webinar is an opportunity to gain awareness around sustainable water management, develop a better understanding of water use on your site, and identify potential cost savings opportunities in relation to water use.”

The live-streamed event will include speakers from BIM, Central Solutions, Ireland’s water management specialists, members of the seafood processing sector, and BIM.

To register for the webinar, click here

Published in Fishing
Tagged under

Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Ireland’s Seafood Development Agency, has extended the deadline of its National Seafood Survey by two weeks in an effort to increase response rates. The survey is designed to highlight the importance of fishing to families and their wider communities in Ireland.

More than one in ten (14%) of Ireland’s 1400 under 10m inshore fishing vessel owners have already completed the survey. All remaining under 10-metre vessel owners now have an opportunity to complete the survey until Monday, 8 February 2021.

Vera O’Donovan, Regional Development Officer, BIM spoke of the importance of inshore fisheries to coastal communities in Ireland and said:

“There are many competing interests for the marine resource. It's vital that inshore fisheries can co-exist in the marine space and have their economic and social contribution to rural society acknowledged fully.”

Inclusion of under 10-metre vessel data will help to provide a more accurate account of the economic contribution that the inshore sector brings to coastal communities and to inform both National and EU policymakers. 

A copy of the survey and a freepost envelope for its return was posted to every under ten-metre fisher in Ireland in December. The survey can also be completed online and emailed to [email protected]. For more details or to download a copy of the survey click here

Published in Fishing
Tagged under

Bord Iascaigh Mhara’s role in certifying the Irish mussel industry as “sustainable” has earned it an “Ocean Hero” award from the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC).

The MSC, based in Britain, is an international non-profit organisation which sets “globally recognised, science-based standards for sustainable fishing and seafood traceability”.

The MSC UK Ocean Hero award “recognises and rewards” fisheries and organisations that have “demonstrated exemplary leadership in the field of seafood sustainability and made a unique contribution to furthering the sustainability of fisheries”.

Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) holds three MSC mussel certificates in both the Republic and Northern Ireland.

The Northern Irish and Irish rope grown mussel fisheries were certified in 2019, and the Irish bottom grown mussel fishery achieved certification in 2013.

The blue MSC label on a seafood product certifies that comes from a wild-catch fishery which has been independently certified to the MSC’s science-based standard for environmentally sustainable fishing.

The label can be found on more than 100 species of seafood in 100 countries

“BIM is an example of vision, commitment and dedication in its push for making the Irish mussel industry 100% MSC certified and sustainable,” MSC senior fisheries outreach manager for Britain and Ireland Katie Keay said.

“Environmental and social sustainability underpins the seafood industry on the island of Ireland,” BIM chief executive Jim O’Toole said.

"This MSC award recognises the collaboration and cross-industry efforts of the bottom grown and rope mussel operators for a sustainable future,” he said.

The Irish mussel industry was valued at €11.7 million in 2018 according to the BIM Business of Seafood report.

The mussel industry in Ireland produces more than 15,000 tonnes of mussels a year. This method of mussel farming was introduced in the 1980s predominantly along the west coast of Ireland.

The Cornish Fish Producers Organisation (CFPO) was highly commended in the “Ocean Hero” category at the MSC awards for its management of the hake gill net fishery.

The CFPO podcast for fishermen, named “ Fathom”, kept its fishing industry informed of developments throughout the Covid-19 lockdown in Britain.

It also teamed up with Seafood Cornwall’s #FishToYourDoor initiative, which brought together fish merchants and customers to support Cornish fishermen through the Corona virus crisis.

Published in Aquaculture
Tagged under

Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Ireland’s Seafood Development Agency, is to host a webinar on Wednesday 9th September 2020 at 2 pm on how the role of cultural values can be integrated more in small-scale fisheries management.

The webinar, which will be chaired and facilitated by BIM and organised by the Cabfishman project, will address the role of cultural values in the management of small-scale fisheries in the Northeast Atlantic and how these values can be more adequately accounted for.

Commenting on the Cabfishman project and webinar, Richard Curtin, Senior Economist with BIM said, “The Cabfishman project is an important international project with partners from Spain, Portugal, France and the UK, addressing common issues facing the small-scale fleets along the Atlantic. A crucial element of the project is the assessment of cultural heritage associated with the sea, fishing and the small-scale fleets and how to value that contribution so it can be accounted for in decision-making and policies and that is something which we are going to explore in this webinar.”

“One of the tasks of the project is to collate examples of cultural heritage and to create an open-access library of these examples that can be added to overtime. From an Irish perspective, we have collated over 400 examples, ranging from artwork by Paul Henry and others, traditional craftsmanship such as currach making, to ancient fishing knowledge such as ‘marcanna na tallamh’.”

This webinar, organised by the Cabfishman project, financed through the INTREREG Atlantic Area Programme, aims to address several questions via the following presentations:

Speakers and topics:

  • Evaluating the cultural services of small-scale fisheries in the Atlantic Area – David Castilla (University of Huelva)
  • Do small-scale fisheries need yet another research project? From output to outcome through stakeholder involvement – Marta Ballesteros (CETMAR Foundation)
  • Do cultural values play a role in Small Scale Fisheries Management? – Norah Parke (Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation)

The webinar is open to the public to attend and fishers, managers, officials, and those with an interest in the future co-management of small-scale fisheries in Ireland are actively encouraged to attend. To register for the free event visit here

Published in Fishing
Tagged under

The Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) National Fisheries College of Ireland in Castletownbere, Co. Cork is piloting the Skipper Full Certificate of Competency as an online course, commenced this week (6th May 2020). The Skipper Full Programme will be conducted as a nine-week online course, followed by three weeks in situ in Castletownbere once the college can open for the new academic term in accordance with COVID restrictions.

This is a popular full-time course, designed for fishermen with a Second-Hand Full Certificate of Competency, and 12 months sea time in that capacity, who wish to gain further qualifications in skippering a vessel. The course delivers tuition in a range of core navigation and safety skills that will aid successful participants to obtain a Skipper Full Certificate of Competency.

BIM took the decision to pilot the training online as it will allow students the opportunity to complete their studies this year. Speaking after the online pilot was announced, Ian Mannix, Skills Development Services Manager, BIM said, “We felt it was important in the current difficult circumstances that students should have the option to continue their training, supported by BIM and embracing new technologies and teaching methods. We are actively looking at what other programmes we can introduce online to support our students’

BIM Skills Development unit is one of BIM’s five organisational units and is focussed on enhancing the attractiveness and viability of careers in the seafood sector. This is achieved by creating fully recognised and accredited pathways for lifelong learning and career progression, featuring recognition of prior learning and portable modular qualifications.

Capt. Shane Begley, College Principal, National Fisheries College of Ireland, Castletownbere spoke of the students’ reaction saying, “Currently we have four students enrolled on the pilot programme and I’m heartened to see how quickly they have adapted to online learning. It’s fantastic to be able to facilitate their ongoing training and we look forward to providing similar support with some of our other courses”.

Published in Fishing
Tagged under

Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM), Ireland’s seafood development agency and the Irish Forum on Natural Capital co-hosted a breakfast seminar Exploring Natural Capital Solutions for the Marine Environment today in the Royal College of Physicians in Dublin. Natural Capital is the available stock of renewable and non-renewable resources that support human life. Natural Capital Accounting applies a measurable value to natural capital in economic and/or ecological terms.

The aim of the seminar, supported by the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund, was to raise awareness and understanding of Natural Capital Accounting and to explore how it might be used by the seafood and other marine sectors.

Speaking at the event, Jim O’Toole, CEO BIM said:

“ The Irish seafood sector depends on natural resources. BIM is constantly exploring new ways to help the industry improve its performance in a way that is sustainable. This focus on the protection of our marine environment will safeguard coastal communities reliant on the sector into the future.”

Jane Stout, Chair of the Irish Forum on Natural Capital and Professor in Ecology in Trinity College Dublin spoke of the similarities between ecology and economics. She said:

“We need to bring nature into decision making. We need to recognise that nature is the fundamental stock that underpins all of our activities. This language of natural capital brings the language of nature into the language of business. It’s not about putting a price on nature. We can put a price and monetary value on nature but that’s not the whole story. It doesn’t tell us about nature’s wider contribution to the ecosystem.”

Earlier this year, BIM commissioned The Institute for the Development of Environmental-Economic Accounting (IDEEA Group) to undertake a feasibility study of the Irish seafood sector to explore whether natural capital accounting could be applied.

Carl Obst and Mark Eigenraam of the IDEEA were among the speakers at today’s event, that included economists and environmental scientists. Speaking at the seminar, Carl Obst said:

“Natural capital accounting recognises and accounts for our relationship with and dependence on the environment. By adopting the United Nations System of Environmental-Economic Accounting (SEEA) BM is providing national leadership in the seafood sector in Ireland.”

Published in Fishing
Tagged under
Page 1 of 6

Cork Harbour Information

It’s one of the largest natural harbours in the world – and those living near Cork Harbour insist that it’s also one of the most interesting.

This was the last port of call for the most famous liner in history, the Titanic, but it has been transformed into a centre for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry.

The harbour has been a working port and a strategic defensive hub for centuries, and it has been one of Ireland's major employment hubs since the early 1900s. Traditional heavy industries have waned since the late 20th century, with the likes of the closure of Irish Steel in Haulbowline and shipbuilding at Verolme. It still has major and strategic significance in energy generation, shipping and refining.

Giraffe wander along its shores, from which tens of thousands of men and women left Ireland, most of them never to return. The harbour is home to the oldest yacht club in the world, and to the Irish Navy. 

This deep waterway has also become a vital cog in the Irish economy.

‘Afloat.ie's Cork Harbour page’ is not a history page, nor is it a news focus. It’s simply an exploration of this famous waterway, its colour and its characters.

Cork Harbour Festival

Ocean to City – An Rás Mór and Cork Harbour Open Day formerly existed as two popular one-day events located at different points on Cork’s annual maritime calendar. Both event committees recognised the synergy between the two events and began to work together and share resources. In 2015, Cork Harbour Festival was launched. The festival was shaped on the open day principle, with Ocean to City – An Ras Mór as the flagship event.

Now in its sixth year, the festival has grown from strength to strength. Although the physical 2020 festival was cancelled due to Covid-19, the event normally features nine festival days starting on the first week of June. It is packed full of events; all made possible through collaboration with over 50 different event partners in Cork City, as well as 15 towns and villages along Cork Harbour. The programme grows year by year and highlights Ireland’s rich maritime heritage and culture as well as water and shore-based activities, with Ocean to City – An Rás Mór at the heart of the festival.

Taking place at the centre of Ireland’s maritime paradise, and at the gateway to Ireland’s Ancient East and the Wild Atlantic Way, Cork is perfectly positioned to deliver the largest and most engaging harbour festival in Ireland.

The Cork Harbour Festival Committee includes representatives from Cork City Council, Cork County Council, Port of Cork, UCC MaREI, RCYC, Cobh & Harbour Chamber and Meitheal Mara.

Marinas in Cork Harbour

There are six marinas in Cork Harbour. Three in Crosshaven, one in East Ferry, one in Monkstown Bay and a new facility is opening in 2020 at Cobh. Details below

Port of Cork City Marina

Location – Cork City
Contact – Harbour Masters Dept., Port of Cork Tel: +353 (0)21 4273125 or +353 (0)21 4530466 (out of office hours)

Royal Cork Yacht Club Marina

Location: Crosshaven, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0) 21 4831023

Crosshaven Boatyard Marina

Location: Crosshaven, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0)21 4831161

Salve Marina Ltd

Location: Crosshaven, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0) 21 4831145

Cork Harbour Marina

Location: Monkstown, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0)87 3669009

East Ferry Marina

Location: East Ferry, Co. Cork
Contact: +353 (0)21 4813390

New Cove Sailing Club Marina

(to be opened in 2020)

Location: Cobh, Co. Cork
Contact: 087 1178363

Cork Harbour pontoons, slipways and ramps

Cork City Boardwalk Existing pontoon

Port of Cork 100m. pontoon

Cork city – End of Cornmarket St. steps and slip;

Cork city - Proby’s Qy. Existing limited access slip

Quays Bar & Restaurant, Private pontoon and ramp for patrons, suitable for yachts, small craft town and amenities

Cobh harbour [camber] Slip and steps inside quay wall pontoon

Fota (zoo, house, gardens) Derelict pontoon and steps

Haulbowline naval basin; restricted space Naval base; restricted access;

Spike Island pier, steps; slip, pontoon and ramp

Monkstown wooden pier and steps;

Crosshaven town pier, with pontoon & steps

East Ferry Marlogue marina, Slip (Great Island side) visitors’ berths

East Ferry Existing pier and slip; restricted space East Ferry Inn (pub)
(Mainland side)

Blackrock pier and slips

Ballinacurra Quay walls (private)

Aghada pier and slip, pontoon & steps public transport links

Whitegate Slip

Passage West Pontoon

Glenbrook Cross-river ferry

Ringaskiddy Parking with slip and pontoon Ferry terminal; village 1km.

Carrigaloe pier and slip; restricted space; Cross-river ferry;

Fountainstown Slip

White’s Bay beach

Ringabella beach

Glanmire Bridge and tide restrictions

Old Glanmire - Quay

Cork Harbour Festival & Ocean to City Race

Following the cancellation of the 2020 event, Cork Harbour Festival will now take place 5 – 13 June 2021, with the Flagship Ocean to City An Rás Mór on 5 June.

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Associations

ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating